TLP Repeat Illumination/Libration and Earthshine predictions for: USA AK Anchorage



Ill is percentage illumination of the Moon
*Indicates a repeat illumination and libration event to within +/- 1 deg for both
A non-* indicates just repeat illumination to within +/-0.5 deg


2018-Aug-03 UT 13:31-13:46 Ill=63% Plato observed by Moore_P on 1991-12-28

     On 1991 Dec 28 at UT 02:10 P. Moore (Selsey, UK) could see no detail on 
     the floor of Plato crater. This report needs to be read in context with 
     the comments by Cameron for A.C. Cook's observation of the floor of 
     Plato on 1992 Jan 18 - Cameron 2006 catalog ID=438.


2018-Aug-04 UT 12:34-13:48 Ill=53% Plato observed by Markov on 1916-1-27

     On 1916 Jan 27 at 22:00? Markov (Russia) noticed that a light sector 
     was visible at the bottom of Plato, in shadow, and contained 3 bright 
     spots, reminiscent of phfescent bodies. The Cmaeron 1978 catalog ID=362 
     and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Aug-05 UT 11:45-12:21 Ill=42% Copernicus observed by Saxton on 1979-9-15

     Copernicus 1979 Sep 15 UT04:40-05:25 J.Saxton (Leeds, UK, 
     8.5" reflector, x185, seeing I-IV, worsening towards local 
     sunrise) made a sketch and noted that the northern tip of the 
     internal shadow, by the floor, was not completely dark. The edge 
     of the floor here could be distingished, even though it was in 
     shadow. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Aug-05 UT 11:45-12:42 Ill=42% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2018-Aug-06 UT 12:13-12:46 Ill=31% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2018-Aug-06 UT 13:50-13:53 Ill=30% Moon observed by Darling_D on 1979-9-16

     On 1979 Sep 16 at UT 08:00-09:00 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5" reflector, x62-x97, clear, but Moon at low altitude) detected 
     four new features that he had not seen before in Earthsine in 
     comparison with what he saw on 16 Jul 1979, this time in the southern 
     part of the Moon. pin-point flashes were seen within these bluish 
     areas. Each time a flash occurred the gas clouds brightened (sometimes 
     by 6x) for a few seconds. Cameron thinks that these are related to 
     moving clouds on the Earth's limb e.g. mackeral sky. Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=69 and weight=1. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Aug-07 UT 12:51-13:56 Ill=21% Aristarchus observed by Gobel on 1824-1-27

     On 1824 Jan 27 at UT03:00 Gobel (Koburg, Germany) observed a reddish 
     colour in Aristarchus crater. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=98 and the 
     weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Aug-15 UT 05:53-06:27 Ill=20% Aristarchus observed by Welch on 1965-8-1 *

     On 1965 Aug 01 at UT 05:00 Welch (Table Mountain, CA, USA, 6" 
     reflector, seeing=excellent) observed some star-like flashes in 
     Aristarchus in ashen light. Cameron says 7/31/65 in MBMW=local time = 
     6/1/65 in UT. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=886 and the 
     weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Aug-19 UT 05:41-07:07 Ill=59% Alphonsus observed by Poppendiek on 1958-11-19 *

     Large plume-like diffuse cloud over central peak, very
     large compared to central peak (@ approx 30km diameter)
     with intensity much different from other parts. Brightness
     between walls and shadowed floor. Would take 3 minutes to
     collapse, so continuously fed. 13-14 days later, at SS,
     central peak was normal. Kuiper took photos after Kozyrev's
     observations, but saw nothing abnormal. Drawing. Haas saw
     nothing in 12inch reflector at the time. Cameron 1978
     catalog TLP ID=705 and weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Aug-23 UT 09:14-09:34 Ill=91% Laplace_A observed by Mobberley_M on 1982-8-1 *

     On 1982 Aug 01 at UT20:50 M. Mobberley (Suffolk, UK, 14" reflector, 
     seeing III-IV) found that LaPlace A was significantly more prominent 
     than usual - comparisons were made with photographs in books. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=178 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Aug-25 UT 11:14-12:12 Ill=99% Daniell observed by Madej_P on 1982-8-3 *

     1982 Mar 08 Daniell UT 22:49-22:57 P.Madej (Hudersfield, UK) - 
     A colour and brightness anomaly was seen a TLP alert was put 
     out. Cameron 2006 catalog extension weight=165 and weight=3. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Aug-26 UT 07:52-11:47 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Arkhipov on 1982-8-4 *

     On 1982 Aug 04 at UT19:25 Arkhipov (Ukraine). found that for 3 minutes 
     Aristarchus brightened. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=180 and weight=0. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2018-Aug-26 UT 07:52-11:47 Ill=100% Copernicus observed by Arkhipov on 1982-8-4 *

     On 1982 Aug 04 at UT19:25 Arkhipov (Ukraine). found that for 5 minutes 
     Copernicus flashes. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=180 and weight=0. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1. 


2018-Aug-27 UT 06:47-07:57 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by McCord on 1965-10-11 *

     Mare Crisium 1965 Oct 11 UTC 05:15 Observed by McCord (Mt Wilson, CA, 
     100" reflector + spectrogram) "Line depth ratios a/b (H),, c/d (K) 
     abnormally high compared with 23 other areas (including 
     Aristarchus?)." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID 902.


2018-Aug-27 UT 06:47-10:14 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by McCord on 1965-10-11 *

     Mare Crisium 1965 Oct 11 UTC 07:32 Observed by McCord (Mt Wilson, 
     CA, 100" reflector + spectrogram) "Line depth ratios a/b (H),, 
     c/d (K) abnormally high compared with 23 other areas (including 
     Aristarchus?)." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog 
     ID 902.


2018-Aug-27 UT 06:47-07:51 Ill=99% Hahn observed by Hazel_N on 2012-1-9 *

     On 2012 Jan 09 UT 21:01-21:08 Hahn crater was imaged by N. Hazel 
     (Beverley, Yorkshire, UK, Nikon D7000 with 70-300 zoom at max, 
     with 2x teleconverter, at f9, 1/320 sec, ISO 400  tripod 
     mounted, mirror up), A series of images were taken. The 21:06 one 
     showed a grey column cutting across the central floor of the 
     crater from the west and then bisecting the eastern rim. All 
     detail inside is completely invisble. Some (but not all) of the 
     other images showed a more blurred view of this feature. It's 
     possible that this was a seeing ripple effect, or just the 
     natural appearance of shadings on the Moon at this time, however 
     for now this will be given an ALPO/BAA weight of 1.


2018-Aug-27 UT 11:35-12:52 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by McCord on 1965-10-11 *

     Mare Crisium 1965 Oct 11 UTC 10:10 Observed by McCord (Mt Wilson, CA, 
     100" reflector + spectrogram) "Line depth ratios a/b (H),, c/d (K) 
     abnormally high compared with 23 other areas (including 
     Aristarchus?)." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID 902.


2018-Aug-27 UT 13:58-14:46 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Manske_R on 1989-6-20 *

     On 1989 Jun 20 UT 0628-06:58 R. Manske (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 1" 
     refractor) discovered blue on the north west inner wall and red on the 
     south east outer wall. At 05:39 he could see the blue but not the red. 
     No colour was detected on Tycho, but he thought that he could detect a 
     pinkish colouration over the whole Moon. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=
     367 and the weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Aug-27 UT 14:14-14:46 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Amery_GW on 1983-10-22 *

     Aristarchus 1983 Oct 22 UT 22:00 G.W. Amery, (Reading, UK, Seeing 
     III-IV) found Aristrachus so bright that the CED was unable to 
     give a reading. The crater's interior was also diffuse in 
     appearance. The Cameron 2008 catalog ID=232 and weight=4. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Aug-28 UT 11:17-12:40 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1983-10-23

     Aristarchus 1983 Oct 23 UT 19:00-01:30 Observer: Foley (Kent, UK, 
     12" reflector, seeing=II) noiced at 19:00UT an extended bright 
     spot on E wall and extending beyond. This was brighter than other 
     areas of the crater. There was also occasional star-like 
     glistening. Foley comments that the inside of Aristarchus was 
     slightly obscured. The TLP started fading from UT20:30 and 
     finished by 01:30UT. six out of nine independent observers 
     confirmed the effects seen. In total 14 observers observed, 9 
     reported back and 6 found abnormalities in Aristarcus though all 
     encountered variable seeing conditions - some had spurious 
     colour. Cameron comments that this was one of the best 
     recorded/confirmed TLP events. All CED brightness measurements 
     obtained were very high. Moore, Nicolson and Clarke (5" refractor 
     and 15" reflector, 230-350xseeing III) found the crater to be 
     very bright at 19:11UT through a 5" refractor and there was a 
     blob on the east rim (Bartlet's EWBS?) at 19:14UT. Nicolson also 
     saw a very bright star-like area on the eastern wall but this was 
     not defined as it usually is. The crater was also very bright at 
     22:43UT using the 15" reflector available to these observers. At 
     01:07UT they used a Moon blink and discovered that the bright 
     region was bright in blue light and less bright in red - although 
     this was not a detactable blink when switching rapidly between 
     filters. They found that the crater had returned to normal by 
     01:15UT. M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, seeing III-IV) observed a large 
     diffuse spot on the east of the crater that was brighter in blue 
     than in red light and the CED device gave a high reading. J.D. 
     Cook (Frimley, UK, seeing III-IV) made a skecth that showed the 
     bright spot extended on the east wall - again the CED reading was 
     high and a lot of detail was visible on the floor. A.C. Cook 
     (Frimley, UK, seeing III-IV) also noted remarkable detail and the 
     bright (as confirmed by CED) blob on the eastern rim. G. North 
     (Sussex, UK, seeing III-II) also confirmed the bright blob on the 
     eastern wall. Wooller found the north west wall was a dirty 
     yellow colour - though no colour was seen elsewhere in or outside 
     the crater. Mosely found the crater to be bright and his sketch 
     revealed the extension of the bright blob on the eastern rim and 
     again a great deal of interior detail. Amery (Reading, UK, seeing 
     III) found Aristarchus to be "a brilliant splash against dulled 
     background in violet filter, especially polarizing filter. CED + 
     polarizer readings high, but not as high as previous night". 
     Mobberley (Suffolk, UK, seeing III-IV) remarked that "spurious 
     colour a total mess around Aristarchus & nothing abnormal seen". 
     A photograph was taken at 20:50UT reveals the  bright blob and 
     entire detail. Peters (Kent, UK, seeingIII-II) observed  
     Aristarchus with a UV screen from 20:15-21:23UT and comented that 
     althogh being very bright, there was no variation between white 
     and UV. It was checked with a Moon Blink device and the radial 
     bands were  clearly seen in white light, < in blue. The Cameron 
     2008 catalog ID=233 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2018-Aug-28 UT 11:47-12:21 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1964-10-23

     Aristarchus 1964 Oct 23 UTC 02:35-02:45 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 3" refractor, 133 & 200x, S=3-5, T=4) "South floor 
     region granulated, 6 deg bright with very faint trace of pale yellow 
     color; rest of crater 8 deg bright." NASA catalog weight=4 (good), NASA 
     catalog ID #859.


2018-Aug-28 UT 11:56-13:24 Ill=96% Moon observed by Spinrad on 1962-9-16

     In 1962 Sep 16 at UT08:05 Spirad (Victoria, B.C., Canada, 48" 
     reflector) obtained a spectrum with a UV emission, in H & K lines 
     compared to Jupiter and Mars. II-AO plates, 6A/mm dispersion. 
     Fraunhofer lines much shallower than planetary ones. (whole
     Moon). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=770 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=4.


2018-Aug-29 UT 07:04-09:13 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Thomas on 1970-4-24 *

     Aristarchus 1970 Apr 24 UTC 07:00 
     Observed by Thomas


2018-Aug-29 UT 11:04-12:40 Ill=92% Posidonius observed by Schmidt_J on 1849-2-11

     Posidonius 1849 Feb 11 UT 02:00? Observed by Schmidt (Athens, Greece, 
     7" refractor) "Bright little crater in it was shadowless. Schroter saw 
     repeated changes in it & others & once saw this crater's shadow 
     replaced by a gray veil. Gruithuisen saw the same thing as Schroter in 
     1821." NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID #128. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2018-Aug-30 UT 07:14-09:50 Ill=86% Plato observed by Lihou on 1886-10-16 *

     1886 Oct 16 UTC 22:00 Observed by Lihou (France?) "Unusual phenomena ? 
     (drawing)" Ref Sirius, Vol 20, 45 p69 (1887). NASA catalog weight=1 
     (very low). NASA catalog ID #252. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Aug-30 UT 07:14-07:53 Ill=86% Aristarchus observed by Sekiguchi on 1970-3-26 *

     Near Aristarchus 1970 Mar 26 UT 17:00 Observed by Sekiguchi, 
     Maisumoto (Tokyo, Japan, 36" reflector) "Pts. N & S of crater 
     were brighter by 0.3 & 0.2 mag. respectively than normal -- 
     far beyond limits of error. Color index (CI) also showed less 
     depend. on phase by 0.1-0.2 mag. Did not show reddening dur. 
     enhancement. Polariz. was less by 1-2%. Photog. photom. 
     showed brightening over whole moon. Resolution = 2,3 km" NASA 
     catalog weight=5 and catalog ID #1236. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Aug-30 UT 07:14-07:53 Ill=86% Kepler observed by Sekiguchi on 1970-3-26 *

     North of Kepler 1970 Mar 26 UT 17:00 Observed by Sekiguchi, Maisumoto 
     (Tokyo, Japan, 36" reflector) "Photog. photom. showed brightening over 
     whole moon. CI N. of Kepler enhanced by 0.5 mag. Resolution = 2,3 km" 
     NASA catalog weight=5 (Very high). NASA catalog ID #1236.


2018-Aug-31 UT 09:35-10:18 Ill=78% Mare_Tranquillitatis observed by Arkhipov on 1985-9-4

     On 1985 Sep 04 at UT 22:15 A.V. Arkhipov (Russia) detected a bright 
     flash in Mare Tranquilitatis that lasted < 1 second and had a diameter 
     of < 2 arc seconds i.e. the limit of seeing resolution. The Cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=280 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Aug-31 UT 09:49-11:45 Ill=77% Aristarchus observed by Anderson on 1967-5-29

     Aristarchus-Herodotus 1967 May 29 UT 06:40-07:25 Observed by Anderson 
     (Manchester, N.Hampshire, 10" reflector, x212, S=G, T=E) "After timing 
     sunset on Theophilus & Cyrillus turned to Aris.-Herod. At 0640 saw red-
     brown color centered at ?=.685, eta=+.390. Glow strongest at largest 
     area at 0640. Decreased in area but not in intensity to 1/2 its size at 
     0648. At 0650 color gone. Seen again at 0658 but not so pronounced. 
     Faded out at 0700, obs. terminated at 0725. (Haas thinks it might have 
     been atm. dispersion at such low alt. of 12-17 deg)." NASA catalog 
     weight=1. NASA catalog ID #1038. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Aug-31 UT 11:55-13:47 Ill=77% Bullialdus observed by Chapman_BW on 1981-12-16

     On 1981 Dec 16 at UT 17:45 B.W. Chapman, Kingston-Upon-Thames, 
     UK, 11.5cm refractor, seeing II, trasnparency Fair) found the 
     east outer ridge brighter in red - inclined to blue. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Aug-31 UT 12:05-13:57 Ill=77% Plato observed by Chapman_BW on 1981-12-16

     On 1981 Dec 16 at UT 17:45 B.W. Chapman, Kingston-Upon-Thames, 
     UK, 11.5cm refractor, seeing II, trasnparency Fair) found the 
     west inner ridge lighter in red, and so to the east and south-
     west floor. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Aug-31 UT 12:54-14:56 Ill=77% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1964-6-30 *

     On 1964 Jun 30 at UT 05:50-06:10 Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA) observed 
     the following in Aristarchus: "Nimbus only -- dark viol. hue. S. part 
     of Aris. floor was granualated & a brown tinge -- changed to yellow & a 
     brown tinge at 0500. First time he ever saw such a change in color. 
     (this obs.listed in 210 & MBMW as June 20, but is a misprint)". The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=828 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.