TLP Repeat Illumination/Libration and Earthshine predictions for: Falkland_Islands - Port_Stanley



Ill is percentage illumination of the Moon
*Indicates a repeat illumination and libration event to within +/- 1 deg for both
A non-* indicates just repeat illumination to within +/-0.5 deg


2018-Dec-10 UT 23:55-00:09 Ill=12% Plato observed by Mannheim_Observers on 1788-1-11

     Bright point on dark part. Cameron 1978
     catalog ID=38 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA catalog 
     weight=4.


2018-Dec-10 UT 23:55-00:09 Ill=12% Promontorium_Laplace observed by Valier on 1912-5-19

     On 1912 May 19 at UT 20:50-21:00 Valier (France?, 4" refractor) 
     observed a small red glowing area near to Promontorium LaPlace (25W 
     46N). The Caemron 1978 catalog ID=337 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2018-Dec-10 UT 23:55-00:09 Ill=12% Baillaud observed by Delaye on 1969-7-17

     near Baillaud (60E, 60N) 1969 Jul 17 UT 20:13-20:25 Observed by Delaye 
     Marseilles, France, 6" refractor) and Donas (Gama, France, 10" 
     refractor). "Noted pulsations nr. crater on NE limb. Duration of pulses 
     were 2s. Saw again at 2015h & 2019h. Duration then @ 4s. No color seen. 
     mag of brightening @ 4 mag. Donas noted at 2016h at crater more 
     brightening than at limb. After 2019h nothing. (atm. ? these periods 
     are similar to those between blow-ups & excursions od star images in 
     seeing, but puzzling why it stopped. Apollo 11 watch). (indep. 
     confirmation)" NASA catalog weight=2 (poor). NASA catalog ID #1154.


2018-Dec-10 UT 23:55-00:00 Ill=12% Harpalus observed by Nunes on 1969-5-19

     Harpalus 1969 May 19 UT 21:20-22:00 Observed by Marcomede 
     Rangel Nunes and Julio Dias Nogueira (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 
     18" refractor). "Brightening in crater (inexperienced 
     observers). (Apollo 10 watch)." NASA catalog weight=0. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1. NASA catalog ID #1126.


2018-Dec-10 UT 23:55-00:09 Ill=12% Mare_Crisium observed by Hedervari on 1969-7-17

     SE edge of Mare Crisium 1969 Jul 17 UT 20:00 Observed by 
     Hedervari,  Hegyessy, Geller (Budapest, Hungary, refractor 
     x200 & x300) "Saw a "mediocre" yellow light. Area photographed 
     on 7/19/1969 but no LTP noted (Apollo 11 watch)" NASA catalog 
     weight=4. NASA catalog ID No. 1153. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Dec-10 UT 23:55-00:09 Ill=12% Aristarchus observed by Fryback_D on 1988-4-20

     On 1988 Apr 20 at UT02:06-03:00 D. Fryback (Madison, WI, USA, 8" 
     reflector, S=3-4) commented that Aristarchus crater looked like a "city 
     from high above "glowing under a cloud". Spain (Fairfield, KY, USA, 8" 
     reflector, S=VG) detected a streak and flashes but reports that the 
     crater was not "glowing", though it was the brightest feature in the 
     Earthshine, but Kepler and Copernicus were bright too. Aristarchus was 
     brighter in shorter exposures than in longer exposures. The Cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=326 and weight="confirmed". The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-11 UT 23:56-00:47 Ill=19% Grimaldi observed by Schroter on 1789-3-30

     On 1789 Mar 30 at UT 20:00? Schroter (Lillienthal, Germany) observed 
     two flickering spots on the eastern edge of Grimaldi and near Riccioli.  
     This was on the Earthlit side of the Moon. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=
     57 and the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Dec-11 UT 23:56-00:47 Ill=19% Riccioli observed by Schroter on 1789-3-30

     On 1789 Mar 30 at UT 20:00? Schroter (Lillienthal, Germany) observed 
     two flickering spots near Riccioloi and on the eastern edge of 
     Grimaldi. This was on the Earthlit side of the Moon. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=57 and the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Dec-11 UT 23:56-00:47 Ill=19% S_Pole observed by Franks on 1912-5-20

     On 1912 May 20 at UT 21:00 Franks (6" refractor) observed the Leibnitz 
     Mountains? (South Pole area) to have a small red glowing area on the 
     dark part of the Moon. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=338 and weight=1. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-11 UT 23:56-00:47 Ill=19% Grimaldi observed by Johnson_LT on 1951-4-11

     1951 Apr 11 UT 02:39:30+/-15s L.T.Johnson (USA) observed a mag 7 
     flash S ofGrimaldi. ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2018-Dec-11 UT 23:56-00:47 Ill=19% Aristarchus observed by Doughty on 1968-5-2

     On 1968 May 02 at UT 01:20-02:14 Doughty (Red Bank, New Jersey, USA, 
     8" reflector, x120) observed a bright area in Aristarchus, surrounded 
     by a faint glow. May have been atmospheric dispersion. Glow fainter at 
     01:56UT and imperceptible at 02:14UT. Kelsey and Ricker consider the 
     observation abnormal. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1070 and weight=3.
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-11 UT 23:56-00:04 Ill=19% Moon observed by Spain_D on 1988-4-21

     On 1988 Apr 21 at UT 01:53 D. Spain (Fairdale, KY, USA, 3.5" 
     reflector?, x60) observed a narrow white streak of mag 5-6 of duration 
     0.5 sec that covered 160-320km near the centre of the Moon at 01:53UT. 
     A similar streak happened again but the direction was different. Next 2 
     small red flashes were seen at 02:00 and 02:01UT of magnitude 7 (<1sec) 
     in the vicinity of Aristarchus. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=327 and the 
     weight=1.


2018-Dec-11 UT 23:56-00:34 Ill=19% Aristarchus observed by Sancristoforo_G on 2011-4-7

     On 2011 Apr 07 UT 19:45-20:10 Aristarchus was seen to be “very 
     bright” in Earthshine. Giorgio Sancristoforo (Milan, Italy, 
     203mm SCT, atmospheric seeing good) noticed Aristarchus to be 
     exceptionally bright (Sketch supplied) at around 20:00 and was 
     the first to report this. Although he did not record the start 
     and end times, he commented that the effect lasted 20-30 minutes 
     and then was significantly reduced in brightness. Although 
     direct comparison in terms of brightnes could not be made with a 
     star, he thought Aristarchus to be brighter than +0.7 in 
     magnitude (Saturn). Furthermore Aristarchus was visible when 
     daylight was still present, when looking through the telescope, 
     although it could not be seen with the naked eye due to too much 
     extraneous light. Aristarchus was probably white in colour, but 
     the observer was partly colour blind and so was uncertain. Not 
     much detail was seen elsewhere in Earthshine, even when the sky 
     darkened, and he was not able to see Kepler or Copernicus, just 
     the limb. No details were seen in Aristarchus itself, for 
     example no ray to the SW was visible. It later transpired that 
     Lajos Bartha (Budapest, Hungary, 70mm refractor, x83, seeing 
     conditions good) had observed Earthshine even earlier from 
     UT19:45-20:10 and noticed a bright area close to the edge of the 
     Moon that he later confirmed was Aristarchus. When he started 
     observing the sky twilight was still a deep blue, but the dark 
     side of the Moon was seen both with the naked eye and through 
     the telescope. Earthshine was medium in brightness and grey in 
     colour. Copernicus and Kepler were weak in brightness but 
     certainly visible. There was some scattered light from the 
     sunlit side of the Moon noticed, but not enough to obscure 
     Copernicus and Kepler from visibility. As a test he moved the 
     telescope around and the bright spot moved with the Moon and so 
     was not a glare problem. The following day he checked Earthshine 
     again but found that the bright spot was not so conspicuous. As 
     a footnote, Tim Haynes (UK) had been observing an occultation of 
     37 Tauri, much earlier at 19:14UT, through 10x50 binoculars. He 
     commented that Earthshine was visible, but that he hadn't 
     noticed Aristarchus - though he was not looking at the Moon 
     specifically to see this crater. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Dec-12 UT 00:02-00:47 Ill=19% Aristarchus observed by Douillet on 1933-3-30

     In 1933 Mar 30 at UT 20:00 Douillet (France?) observed in the 
     Aristarchus region: "White. (in the dark part)". The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=404 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-12 UT 00:03-00:47 Ill=19% Unknown observed by Cook_J on 2002-8-12

     On 2002 Aug 12 at UT 19:27 James Cook (Chelmsford, UK) detected a flash 
     on the Moon. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-12 UT 00:33-00:47 Ill=19% Aristarchus observed by Madej_P on 1981-10-2

     On 1981 Oct 02 P. Madej (Huddersfield, UK, 77mm refractor, 
     seeing I to II) noticed that at 20:48 UT Aristarchus had a 2nd 
     magnitude star-like point on the NE rim (x38). At x83 he could 
     see a small disc of around 3-6 arc sec in diameter, and at 
     x111 it looked the ame but bluish-white in colour. He was able 
     to see Aristarchus, Herodotus, and Vallis Schroteri. 
     Observations ceased at 21:27 UT due to trees blocking the 
     view. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-12 UT 00:50-02:08 Ill=20% Earthshine: Geminids: ZHR>120 vel=35km/s & Coma Berencides: ZHR=3 vel=65km/s

2018-Dec-12 UT 23:57-01:16 Ill=27% Mare_Crisium observed by Emmett on 1826-4-12

     Mare Crisium 1826 Apr 12 UT 20:00 Observed by Emmett (England?) "Black 
     moving haze or cloud". NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID 
     109. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-12 UT 23:57-00:40 Ill=27% Grimaldi observed by ASTRONET on 1966-9-20

     On 1966 Sep 20 at UT 03:22 Three Astronet observers (Phoenix, AZ, and 
     Los Angeles, CA, USA) (independently?) reported flashes in Grimaldi 
     crater. One observer was in Phoenix AZ, and another in Losa Angeles, 
     CA, so probably not due to the atmosphere. Cameron comments that the 
     astronaut Schmidt on Apollo 17 saw a flash in it while orbiting the 
     Moon. the Cameron 1978 catalog ID=977 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=4.


2018-Dec-12 UT 23:57-00:16 Ill=27% Aristarchus observed by Gervais on 1969-7-19

     On 1969 Jul 19 at UT 19:30-21:30 Gervais (Lodure, France, 4.5" 
     refractor?) saw the whole region of Aristarchus and its environs 
     as brighter than normal. Two photographs were obtained. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1156 and weight=5. At UT 20:30-20:55 
     Oliver (Spain, using a reflector) found the Aristarchus to have 
     brightened by about 1 magnitude. From UT 20:12-20:30 the crater 
     had been normal. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1167 and the 
     weight=2. At UT 21:00-00:35 P. Mourilhe Silva (Rio de Janeiro, 
     Brazil, 19.5" refractor) saw Aristarchus as a very bright 
     elliptical shape which extended to the north like a bridge 
     between two points. Jose M. L. da Silva and Ronaldo Mourao (Rio 
     de Janeiro, Brazil, 13" refractor) saw a brightening on the 
     north west wall from 21:24-23:22UT intermittently but cont'd. 
     Wall was extraordinarilly bright, along NW wall brighter. 
     Moseley (Armagh, Northern Ireland, UK, 10" refractor) detected 
     an unusual bright, along north west wall, brighter than normal 
     in Earthshine and brighter than crater. It was not constant, but 
     pulsated irregularly with frequency of 20 seconds and amplitude 
     0.75-1.0 magnitudes. No colour seen or obscuration though lokked 
     for. Clouds interrupted observations. Vasquez (Valparaiso, 
     Chile, 12" reflector) saw it as a very luminous point of 
     magnitude 1. Wairy Cardoso (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 12" 
     reflector and 18" refractor) noted a bright. 1s??? The Cameron 
     catalog ID=1168 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2018-Dec-12 UT 23:57-00:16 Ill=27% Theophilus observed by Fox_WE on 1969-7-19

     Theophilus 1969 Jul 19 UT 19:30-21:30 Observed by Fox (Notts. 
     England, 6.5" reflector) and Ringsdore (England, 15" 
     reflector). Fox saw intermittent glow in Theoph. for > 2h
     (time not given). Ringsdore confirmed. (Apollo 11 watch)" 
     Confirmed by Baum 21:00-21:20UT. NASA catalog weight=5. NASA 
     catalog ID No. 1166. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2018-Dec-12 UT 23:57-00:18 Ill=27% S_Pole observed by Kemp_A on 2011-4-8

     South Pole 2011 Apr 08 UT 19:30-20:00 A.Kemp (Mold, Flintshire, UK) observed that the 
     Leibnitz peaks at the southern pole stood out sharply. However one of the peaks was “shining 
     like a spot light. So bright that I couldn’t make out its shape”. – image clear and steady with 
     excellent transparency and seeing in the 70mm f/13 refractor (25mm and 10mm eyepieces). 
     Inspections during the above time period revealed no changes in brightness. Previous 
     observations of this area had never shown such an unusual brightness, and Arthur likened the 
     brightness to “a maximum brightness of Venus shining amongst 2nd magnitude stars”. The 
     observer was an experienced observer. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-13 UT 00:00-01:18 Ill=27% Grimaldi observed by Thinon on 1969-7-19

     Grimaldi 1969 Jul 19 UT 20:39-20:45 Delaye (France, 25cm 
     refractor) saw a bright bluish spot near Grimaldi. 20:43 a 
     flash was seen by Thinon. Delaye saw flashes at 20:44 and 
     20:45. Between 21:00 and 23:00 (J. M. L.) da Silva (Rio de 
     Janeiro, Brazil, 19.5" refractor) saw a bright spot on the W 
     (IAU??) of Grimaldi. However there is a bright spot near 
     Grimaldi, so this maybe normal. NASA ID = 1167. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2018-Dec-13 UT 00:05-01:18 Ill=27% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1975-12-8

     On 1975 Dec 08 at UT18:00-20:40 P.W. Foley (Wilmington, Kent, 
     UK, 12" reflector, x60-x624, seeing II, slight mist) found 
     Aristarchus to be less well visible than features such as: 
     Grimaldi, Reiner, Darwin/Byrgius, Kepler, Plato and Sinus 
     Iridum. Earthshine was exceptionally good tonight and was 
     orange/red in colour. Photographs were taken and these confirmed 
     the apparent dullness of Aristarchus. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-13 UT 00:14-01:18 Ill=27% Gassendi observed by Jackson_L on 1990-3-31

     On 1990 Mar 31 at UT 21:30 L. Jackson (England, UK?) observed a red 
     glow in Earthshine in Gassendi as shown in a sketch. Apparently 
     Gassendi can often show up red colours (according to Cameron) but 
     rarely is this seen in Earthshine. Foley saw the sketch and suspects 
     that the location was Gassendi. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=397 and 
     weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Dec-13 UT 00:14-00:18 Ill=27% Langrenus observed by Dollfus_A on 1992-12-29

     On 1992 Dec 29 at UT 17:42-17:54 A. Dollfus (Meudon, France, 1m 
     aperture telescope used) detected evidence for a dust cloud using CCD 
     polarimetry. The ALPO/BAA weight=5.


2018-Dec-13 UT 01:10-01:18 Ill=27% Alphonsus observed by Wilkins_HP on 1949-6-1

     Alphonsus area? 1949 Jun 01 UT 22:06 H.P. Wilkins (Kent, UK, 6" 
     reflector x200) observed a bright white 1 sec stationary (mag 
     3?) flash in Earthhsine, close to the central meridian, and due 
     E of Theophilus (potentially in the general area of Alphonsus?). 
     The flash was approximately 6 km in diameter. ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2018-Dec-13 UT 00:51-02:16 Ill=28% Earthshine: Geminids: ZHR>120 vel=35km/s & Coma Berencides: ZHR=3 vel=65km/s

2018-Dec-13 UT 23:58-01:20 Ill=36% Mare_Crisium observed by Emmett on 1826-4-13

     Mare Crisium 1826 Apr 13 UT 20:00 Observed by Emmett (England?) "Black 
     moving haze or cloud" NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID =
     109. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-13 UT 23:58-00:48 Ill=36% Aristarchus observed by Delaye on 1969-7-20

     On 1969 Jul 20 at UT 19:55-20:10 Delaye, Thinon, Donas, and Jourdran 
     (Marseilles, France, 10" refractor, x60) saw between 19:55-20:04UT 
     Aristarchus to be bright and in it pulsations with 10 sec duration. At 
     20:05UT it's spot brightened, at 20:08:50-20:35:50UT brightening and 
     pulsations of variable duration. At 20:55:50UT just a feeble flash. 
     Cameron comments that this is probably not atmpsheric effects as the 
     period is too long - also it was during the Apollo 11 watch. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1175 and th weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Dec-13 UT 23:58-00:00 Ill=36% Atlas observed by Germann on 1969-5-22

     Atlas 1969 May 22 UT 21:20-21:40 Observed by Germann, Wild, Vieli 
     (Zurich, Switzerland, 6" reflector) "Rim towards the sun was bright. 
     Part of time was interrupted. (Apollo 10 watch)" NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #1135.


2018-Dec-13 UT 23:58-00:24 Ill=36% Censorinus observed by Marshall_KP on 1984-7-5

     On 1984 Jul 05 at UT 00:00-01:25 Marshall (Medelin, Columbia, 
     seeing=II) observed that Censorinus was much less bright than Proclus 
     (confirmed by CED readings). Cameron 2006 catalog ID=247 and weight=3. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-13 UT 23:58-00:25 Ill=36% Proclus observed by Marshall on 1984-7-5

     On 1984 Jul 05 at UT 00:00-01:25 Marshall (Medelin, Columbia) found 
     Proclus to be much brighter than Censorinus (which of the two was 
     abnormal is a question) - though he thought that Censorinus looked 
     dull. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=247 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2018-Dec-13 UT 23:58-00:35 Ill=36% Langrenus observed by Dollfus_A on 1992-12-30

     On 1992 Dec 30 at UT 17:36 A. Dollfus (Meudon, France, 1m aperture 
     telescope used) detected evidence for a dust cloud using CCD 
     polarimetry. The ALPO/BAA weight=5.


2018-Dec-14 UT 01:08-01:45 Ill=36% Aristarchus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1969-5-22

     On 1969 May 22 at UT23:20 an unknown observer reported some 
     brightenings with pulsations in Aristarchus crater, Cameron suspects 
     atmospheric aberrations. This was during the Apollo 10 watch. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1136 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-14 UT 00:53-02:18 Ill=37% Earthshine: Geminids: ZHR>120 vel=35km/s & Coma Berencides: ZHR=3 vel=65km/s

2018-Dec-14 UT 23:59-01:33 Ill=45% Messier observed by no on 1968-5-5

     Messier 1968 May 05 UT 01:35-03:35 Observed by Delano (USA).
     No oclour noticed with Moon blink device, but Messier A's W. 
     wall did brighten slightly over the 2 hours of observations 
     compared to Messier's W wall. The ffect was less marked in 
     the 2nd hour. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-14 UT 23:59-00:29 Ill=45% Theophilus observed by Fox_WE on 1969-7-21

     Theophilus 1969 Jul 21 UT 19:30-21:45 and 21:00-22:00 Observed by Fox 
     (Newark, England, 6.5" reflector,) and Baum (Chester, England, 4.5" 
     refractor) (S=6, T=4) "At wall, adjacent to Cyrillus was a redish glow,
     then obscur. (Fox). Baum  saw intermittant white-blue shimmering as if 
     glowing thru dust glowing & upsurge in brightness on c.p. Gradually 
     faded to normal at 21:20. 1st time ever seen by him tho. obs. since 
     1947. Image sharp, no haziness. (indep. confirm. of activity, but 
     details differ, but same time, Apollo 11 watch)." NASA catalog 
     weight=5. NASA catalog ID #1180. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Dec-14 UT 23:59-00:41 Ill=45% Promontorium_Agassiz observed by Green_J on 1991-5-21

     On 1991 May 21 at UT05:30-06:15 J. Green (Orangevale, CA, USA, 11" 
     reflector) photgrapphed a broad bright band stretching east and north 
     of Cassini crater in 3 exposures taken 10 minutes apart. This 
     photographic sequence shows a gradual widening towards Cassini and by 
     the 3rd exposure the band is touching (and then obscuring) Cassini. A 
     "fan" was visible in the north east and WSW directions, later this was 
     seen as rays and this was even seen in the view finder of the camera. 
     Cameron comments that this might be lens flare but suspects that it 
     would not have been seen in the view finder. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=427 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-15 UT 01:00-01:26 Ill=46% Bessel observed by Travnik on 1969-5-23

     North of Bessel 1969 May 1969 May 23 UT 22:54. Nelson Travnik 
     (Observatorio Flammarion, located at 45.58W, 21.87S, f/15 
     10cm refractor, Kodak Tri-X, 1/15 sec exposure, sky 
     conditions excellent). Dark spot photographed just north of 
     Bessel - could be a photographic defect?. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-15 UT 00:54-02:14 Ill=46% Earthshine: Geminids: ZHR>120 vel=35km/s & Coma Berencides: ZHR=3 vel=65km/s

2018-Dec-15 UT 23:59-00:10 Ill=55% Plato observed by Elger_TG on 1887-2-1

     Plato 1887 Feb 01 UT 18:00 Observed by Elger (England) "Ill-defined 
     shadow of peaks of W.border-in contrast to sharpness of mts. outside 
     it. Never seen before. Such phenomena occur on floor, but never on 
     ramparts. (Drawing)." NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog 
     ID #254. ALPO/BAA catalog weight=1.


2018-Dec-16 UT 00:07-01:37 Ill=55% Theophilus observed by Cook_JD on 1978-11-8

     Theophilus 1978 Nov 08 UT 20:49-22:00 Observed by J.D. Cook 
     (Frimley, 12" reflector, 6mm Ortho eyepiece, seeing III-IV) 
     Orange discolouration seen on ESE crater floor. Moon blink 
     tried, but no blink detected. By 21:10 the effect had lessened, 
     but was still orange. By 21:50-21:58 the effect was smaller and 
     perhaps more on the SE of the floor. Colour confirmed by Foley. 
     Fitton may also have been observing. At 22:00 A.C. Cook observed 
     and commented that a darkish, perhaps brown-orange colour seen - 
     but suspected it was probably spurious colour - but by now the 
     seeing was V. J.H. Robinson, whilst doing a Moon Blink sweep of 
     several features, including Theophilus, had not noticed anything 
     unusual 18:50-19:10. By 22:30-22:35UT, he still could not detect 
     a blink, but noticed intermittent darkining on the shaded area 
     on the E. floor, but seeing was now IV. The darkening was more 
     noticeable in blue than red light. BAA Lunar Section 
     observation. 2006 Cameron catalog ID #40 weight=3. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2018-Dec-16 UT 00:10-02:03 Ill=55% Mons_Piton observed by Fornarucci on 1972-2-23

     On 1972 Feb 23 at UT0010-0035 Fornarucci (Garfield, NJ, USA, 6" 
     reflector, x250, seeing=fair and transparency=3.5). Shading 
     usually visible west of it was not seen. Cameon comments that 
     the albedo must have been at 5, where normally it is 4.5 and the 
     nearby plain is 5). Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1322 and weight=2.
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-16 UT 02:22-02:26 Ill=56% Fracastorius observed by Robinson_JH on 1975-4-19

     Fracastorius 1975 Apr 19 UT 19:47, 20:40, 20:45 Observed by 
     Robinson (Teignmouth, UK, 26cm reflector) "Fracastorius had a 
     blink - it was bright in red and darker in blue at these three 
     times, and probably in between. This was possibly natural 
     surface colour being detected?". ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-16 UT 02:22-02:26 Ill=56% Mare_Crisium observed by Robinson_JH on 1975-4-19

     Mare Crisium 1975 Apr 19 UT 19:47-20:37 Observed by 
     Robinson (Teignmouth, UK, 26cm reflector) "Mare Crisium N. end 
     of floor - blink (red and blue filters) in patches, bright in 
     red. Blink stops at 20:37". ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-17 UT 00:00-00:54 Ill=65% Proclus observed by Blair_G on 1980-1-26

     On 1980 Jan 26 at UT21:35-22:25 Blair (Refrewshire, Scotland, 10" 
     reflector, 83-276x, seeing=III-IV and transparency poor) discovered a 
     bright spot on the north rim and through filters it "flashed" green, 
     red and blue. Clouds interupted observing, but when they cleared the 
     effect was still present. Other craters did not show this effect. 
     Cameron catalog ID=83 and weight=4.


2018-Dec-17 UT 00:00-01:02 Ill=65% Langrenus observed by Dollfus_A on 1993-1-2

     On 1993 Jan 02 at UT 17:42 A. Dollfus (Meudon, France, 1m aperture 
     telescope used) detected evidence for a dust cloud in Langrenous crater 
     using CCD polarimetry. The ALPO/BAA weight=5.


2018-Dec-17 UT 00:53-02:41 Ill=65% Plato observed by Bartlett on 1964-11-14

     Plato 1964 Nov 14 UT 01:00? Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA, 
     4" refractor?) "Peak on E. wall brilliant white, strong blue band at 
     inner base; on S. wall was a small, bright red spot." NASA catalog 
     weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #864.


2018-Dec-17 UT 00:59-01:23 Ill=65% Copernicus observed by LeFranc_B on 1990-4-4

     On 1990 Apr 04 at UT 21:30-21:50 B. LeFranc (France?) reported 
     observing a white flame effect in Copernicus crater (sketch made) - 
     though Foley comments that the actual location was east of the crater. 
     The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=398 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2018-Dec-17 UT 01:20-02:41 Ill=65% Messier observed by Kelsey on 1968-5-7

     On 1968 May 07 at UT 03:00-03:40 Kelsey (Riverside, CA, USA, 8" 
     reflector) observed Messier and Messier A and noted the following: "The 
     ray-tail halo (in N. ray) showed a possible enhancement in blue filter 
     at 1st obs. per. but not seen at 0330. Later enhancement was indicated 
     in red filter but not apparent at 0600h. The red enhancement is very 
     unsual; but has been suspected on a few previous occasions. Not seen 
     vis. (confirm. of Jean?)" The Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and weight=5.
     The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Dec-17 UT 01:21-02:41 Ill=65% Posidonius observed by Nazareth on 1970-4-15

     Posidonius 1970 Apr 15 UT 21:05-22:10 Observed by Wanderley 
     Nazareth (Sao Paulo, Brazil, reflector) "Intermittant 
     pulsation. Drawing 20S interval for pulsations. (too long for 
     atmospheric aberration? Apollo 13 watch)." NASA catalog 
     weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1254. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Dec-17 UT 01:45-02:39 Ill=65% Mons_La_Hire observed by Klein_HJ on 1887-2-2

     La Hire 1887 Feb 02 UTC 20:00? Observed by Klein (Cologne, Germany, 6" 
     refractor) "Intense yellow streak that cast shadows around neighboring 
     features". NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #255.
     


2018-Dec-17 UT 02:01-02:41 Ill=65% Plato observed by daSilva on 1970-4-15

     Near and on Plato 1970 Apr 15 UT 21:45-22:04 Observed by da 
     Silva (Sao Paulo, Brazil, 10" & 20" refractors) "Crater chain W. 
     of Plato -- 3rd crater W. (Plato Y) was brighter than 
     surroundings. Lozenge on W. wall (landslip?) was darker than 
     inner wall. Bright part of wall was yellowish-white. da Silva 
     reports this as neg. (normal aspects) obs (Apollo 13 watch 
     probably normal as Y is a bright halo crater)." NASA catalog 
     weight=0. NASA catalog ID #1255. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-17 UT 02:16-02:41 Ill=66% Tycho observed by Travnik on 1970-4-15

     Tycho 1970- Apr 15 UTC 22:00-23:00 Observer: Nelson Travnik 
     (Matias Barbosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil, 4" refractor, x250 & 
     x400, seeing excellent, Wratten 15 and 23 filters used) 
     "Slightly pulsating white glow on W. (IAU?) wall's external 
     slope (Apollo 13 watch). NASA catalog ID #1256, NASA weight=2. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-17 UT 03:46-04:25 Ill=66% Alphonsus observed by Fournier on 1969-7-24 *

     Alphonsus 1969 Jul 24 UT 01:00-02:35 Observed by Fournier (Lowell, 6" 
     reflector x158) and Dillon (Massachuchusets, USA) "Fournier saw obscur. 
     & red in crater. 1 of the dark halos (NE) was very difficult to detect 
     -- seemed to be a whitish mist. Detail best seen in blue & green 
     filters. Dillon found halo much lighter than usual, with sharp boundary 
     washed out. Halo was darker thru blue filter, indicating red when it's 
     normally bluisg-green. Next nite it was normal. Worsening weather 
     stopped obs. (confirmation. Apollo 11 watch)." NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very good). NASA catalog ID #1185.


2018-Dec-18 UT 00:01-00:43 Ill=74% Proclus observed by Cook_MC on 1989-7-13

     Proclus 1989 Jul 13 UT  21:04-21:13 Observed by M.Cook (Frimley, UK, 
     90mm Quastar Cat., Seeing III, transoparency hazy) and by Moore 
     (Selsey, England) "Following an alert call by Miles concerning the 
     crater Proclus looking different, Cook observed a circular dark patch 
     that filled about half of the eastern half of the crater floor. To cut 
     down the glare a blue filter was then used and a slightly less dark 
     area was seen extending from this in a southerly direction. 8 rays were 
     seen. The dark patch was confirmed by Patrick Moore. However David 
     Darling (USA) who observed a few hours later on 1989 Jul 14 at 03:28 UT 
     could not see this dark patch." BAA Lunar Section observation. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=370 and weight=?. The ALPO/BAA weight=2


2018-Dec-18 UT 00:45-02:40 Ill=74% Hevelius observed by Emmett on 1826-4-17

     Scarcely a trace of nebulae tonight. As long as to June 10 at
     2000UT? A little blackness remained. (P. Moore thinks it
     was a LTP, WSC it was a permanent feature?) Drawing. Seen
     by Nevelius Emmett, J. Boroughbridge, England. The 2006
     Extension catalog by Cameron assigns an ID No. of 4 and a
     weight of 1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-19 UT 00:02-00:55 Ill=83% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1975-12-14

     Aristarchus 1975 Dec 14/15 UT 17:05-00:30 Observed by Foley 
     (Dartford, England, 12" reflector, S=II) and Moore (Sussex, 
     UK, 15" reflector x250 S=IV) and Argent and Brumder (Sussex, 
     UK). In early sunrise conditions, W. wall was less brilliant 
     than usual -- matched only by Sharp, Bianchini, & Marian. 
     Extraordinary detail could be seen on this wall. Also noted 
     intense & distinctly blue color entire length of W. wall. 3 
     others corroborated detail, but not color. Moore found things 
     normal & saw Aris. brightest at 2030-2125h tho Argent & 
     Brumder made it < Proclus" NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catlog 
     ID #1422. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-19 UT 00:02-02:14 Ill=83% Aristarchus observed by Zeller_P on 2013-4-22 *

     On 2013 Apr 22 UT 01:39-02:37 P. Zeller (Indianapollis, USA, 
     10" f/4 reflector, x200, seeing 6, Transparency 3 - scattered 
     cirrus) observed visually (depicted in sketch) the two closely 
     spaced NW wall dark bands) to have a rusty-red hue. The colour 
     of these bands did not change over the period of the observing 
     session. Images were taken, but resolution and image S/N is 
     not sufficient to resolve separate bands here, or to detect 
     colour. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-19 UT 00:47-02:14 Ill=83% Plato observed by North_G on 1981-8-11

     On 1981 Aug 11 at UT21:05-21:36 G. North (England, seeing=poor) 
     detected, in green light, a darkening on the floor of Plato. This 
     effect was not seen elsewhere. J-H Robinson (Teighmouth, Devon, UK) 
     detected on the SSE rim (inner and beyond) a triangle that appeared 
     hazy in a wide range of filters at 21:05UT. However at 21:36UT it was 
     only hazy in green and blue light. No similar effect was seen 
     elsewhere. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=150 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2018-Dec-19 UT 00:47-03:03 Ill=83% Torricelli_B observed by North_G on 1995-4-11 *

     Torricelli B 1995 Apr 11 UTC 20:15 Observed by North (UK). "Colour 
     moonblink reaction, and crater dull". BAA Lunar Section report. ALP\BAA 
     weight=3.


2018-Dec-19 UT 01:45-02:59 Ill=83% Gassendi observed by Cook_AC on 1977-10-23

     On 1978 Oct 23 observing period: UT22:00-22:40 A.C. Cook (Frimley, 
     Surrey, UK, 6" reflector, x144, 6mm Ortho eyepiece, seeing IV, red and 
     blue filters used) saw at 22:10 a secctor on thwe western floor to be 
     mainly bright in the red. The surface was bumpy here. The observer at 
     the time commented that this was probably not a TLP, but no precise 
     explanation given. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-19 UT 02:48-03:02 Ill=84% Herodotus observed by Martini_A on 2017-2-8

     On 2017 Feb 08 UT 01:45 A.Martini Jr (10" Schmidt-Cassegrain 
     with ASI 120 MC camera +IR filter, Gain 40, Gamma 36, 
     exposure 0.003 sec) saw on a computer monitor screen a flash 
     to far to the west of Herodotus and Aristarchus at the 
     location 54.53W, 23.5N. It had a duration of 0.5 sec and on a 
     brightness scale of 0 = night side of the Moon to 10 = 
     Aristarchus, ranked 7. Unfortunately they were not recording 
     at the time. As there was no confirmation observation and it 
     could be a cosmic ray air shower detection, the ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1


2018-Dec-20 UT 00:02-00:03 Ill=90% Aristarchus observed by Schroter on 1788-5-17

     On 1788 May 17 at UT 21:00 Schroter (Lilleanthal, Germany, 210x 
     reflector) observed small depression, 1, near Aristarchus to be a 
     bright spot, similar to Cameron 1978 catalog ID report #45. The Cameron 
     catalog ID=48 and the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2018-Dec-20 UT 00:02-00:10 Ill=90% Piazzi_Smyth observed by Price_M on 1982-12-27 *

     On 1982 Dec 27 at UT 23:00 M. Price (Camberley, Surrey, UK, Seeing=III 
     and transparency=good) observed that Piazzi-Smyth was brighter than Mon 
     Piton at 23:00. Photographic atlas was checked to verify that this was 
     abnormal. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=193 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2018-Dec-20 UT 00:11-01:42 Ill=90% Oceanus_Procellarum observed by Wildey on 1962-12-9

     In 1962 Dec 09 at UT 07:36 Wildey and Pohn (Mt Wilson, CA, USA, 60" 
     reflector) observed that Oceanus Procellarum was 1.13 magnitudes 
     brighter than normal. Observation at sunrise and is abnormal if area 
     measured was mare. If it were an east facing wall it would be normal. 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-20 UT 00:17-01:48 Ill=90% Aristarchus observed by Wildey on 1962-12-9

     In 1962 Dec 09 at UT 07:42 Wildey and Pohn (Mt Wilson, CA, USA, 60" 
     reflector) observed that Aristarchus was 0.80 magnitudes (x2) fainter 
     than average for this age (photometric measurement) Vmag=3.80, average=
     3.0. The Cameron 1978 catalog weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-20 UT 00:39-01:54 Ill=90% Langrenus observed by Moore_P on 1992-2-16

     On 1992 Feb 16 at UT 01:05-01:35 P. Moore (Selsey, UK, 12.5" 
     reflector, seeing=III) found the north rim area to be both very 
     bright and misty - though he did not think it to be a TLP but 
     wanted it to be recorded, just in case. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=440 and the weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-20 UT 00:57-02:15 Ill=91% Aristarchus observed by MacKenzie on 1970-4-18

     Aristarchus-Herodotus 1970 Apr 18 UT 20:14 Observed by MacKenzie 
     (UK,2.5" refractor x45, seeing Antoniadi I) "Fairly strong blink 
     in a spot 1/2 way between the 2 craters. Drawing (Apollo 13 
     watch). NASA catalog weight=2. NASA catalog ID #1257. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2018-Dec-20 UT 01:58-03:02 Ill=91% Torricelli_B observed by North_G on 2002-10-18

     Torricelli B 2002 Oct 18 UTC 20:56-21:59 Observer: G.North (UK, 8" 
     reflector, x134, Seeing Antoniadi IV, Transparency good) - thought that 
     Torricelli B was perhaps a little brighter than expected, especially 
     when compared to Moltke and Censorinus based upon past recollection of 
     relative brightnesses at this colongitude). Slight bluish tint seen as 
     well. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Dec-20 UT 03:17-05:30 Ill=91% Plato observed by Hobdell on 1981-10-11 *

     On 1981 Oct 11 at UT 00:05-02:00 B.Hobdell (St Petersberg, FL, USA, 4" 
     refractor, S=3 and T=5) observed a brightening on the floor of Plato. 4 
     bright spots appeared and vanished and there was a fith one in the 
     centre that was very bright at times. At UT 00:14 the central spot 
     became bright then was "followed by a haze permeating entire floor, 
     heaviest in the northern quadrant. Came from 2 S peaks or white spots, 
     shaped like a boomerang extending to presumed c.p. (c.c ?). White 
     flashed at 0052 from it cloud changed shape - spread N. At 0136 
     brightening from c.c. area 0419 dissipated. All white spots seen at 
     0200. Its outer flanks seen clearly the whole time". The above is 
     quoted from the Cameron 2006 catalog ID=155 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3. 


2018-Dec-22 UT 00:03-02:09 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1959-3-24 *

     Aristarchus 1959 Mar 24 UT 02:24-02:35 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 4" reflector x180, S=3, T=5) "Strong blue & 
     blue-viol. gl. on E.wall, EWBS, SWBS with intermittent display.
     At this time he noted in his 5-in L a total disappearance of 
     viol. gl. & reappear. 1 min. later. Altogether, found 4 such 
     occurences in his records, in '54, '57, ' & '59."NASA catalog 
     weight=4. NASA catalog ID #716. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-22 UT 00:47-04:20 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1959-3-24 *

     Aristarchus 1959 Mar 24 UT 04:35-05:15 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 4" reflector x180, S=3, T=5) "Strong blue & 
     blue-viol. gl. on E.wall, EWBS, SWBS with intermittent display.
     At this time he noted in his 5-in L a total disappearance of 
     viol. gl. & reappear. 1 min. later. Altogether, found 4 such 
     occurences in his records, in '54, '57, ' & '59." NASA catalog 
     weight=4. NASA catalog ID #716. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-22 UT 06:12-06:39 Ill=100% Schickard observed by Wollridge on 1934-2-28 *

     Schickard 1934 Feb 28 UTC 22:00? Observed by Wollridge 
     (Broomsgrove, England, 6.5" reflector) "Well-known crater form 
     obj. presented anomalous, misty appearance of white spots. 
     Confirmed by Moore in 1939, 1941. NASA catalog ID #411. NASA 
     catalog weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Dec-25 UT 05:24-05:26 Ill=91% Plato observed by Haas_W on 1938-5-17 *

     Plato 1938 May 17 UTC 08:00 Observed by Haas? (New Mexico?, USA, 
     12" reflector?) "Floor-least bit greenish (other colors on other 
     dates, e.g. Je 23, 7/22/37, & 7/15/38)." NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). ALPO/BAA weight=2. NASA catalog ID #437.


2018-Dec-30 UT 06:41-06:49 Ill=40% Earthshine: sporadic meteors