TLP Repeat Illumination/Libration and Earthshine predictions for: UK Hampshire Oakley



Ill is percentage illumination of the Moon
*Indicates a repeat illumination and libration event to within +/- 1 deg for both
A non-* indicates just repeat illumination to within +/-0.5 deg


2018-Jul-03 UT 01:43-03:01 Ill=80% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1991-7-31

     On 1991 Jul 31 at UT 07:50 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 3" 
     refractor) observed that the south floor of Aristarchus was wellow - 
     "almost gold, spilled over S wall on ray toward Herodotus". Cameron 
     comments that Bartlett often reported a yellow floor but not a spill of 
     the colour over to the external ray. Cameron also comments that 
     Louderback's refractor would refract more in blue light than in yellow, 
     therefore she did not think that it was due to chromatic aberation. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=431 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2018-Jul-03 UT 01:43-03:01 Ill=80% Mons_Piton observed by Louderback_D on 1991-7-31

     On 1991 Jul 31 at UT 07:50 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 3" 
     refractor) found that all of Mons Piton was "unusually dark". Points D, 
     C (E and S resp), usually brightest points, but this time were not 
     bright. "Whole mt was as dark as W wall usually is at this time. In 
     violet filter Piton disappeared completely, but was a little brighter 
     in red filter and points D & G showed. Color not seen by eye. No albedo 
     measured. Suggests red event." Cameron rules out chromatic aberation 
     from Louderback's refractor. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=431 and the 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-07 UT 02:35-03:14 Ill=42% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2018-Jul-08 UT 02:59-03:15 Ill=31% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2018-Jul-09 UT 03:34-04:06 Ill=21% Aristarchus observed by Schmidling on 1964-6-6 *

     On 1964 Jun 28 at UT 08:20-09:10 Schmidling, St Clair, and Platt 
     (Riverdale, New York, USA, 8" reflector, x256) observed in the 
     Aristarchus, Herodotus, Schroter's valley area: two red spot glows, 
     glimmer, looked like ruby gems. Cameron says that the date was 
     predicted by Greenacre and looked for. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=817 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.  


2018-Jul-16 UT 20:07-21:47 Ill=19% Picard observed by Unknown_English_Observer on 1909-5-23 *

     In 1909 May 23 at UT 18:00? an unknown English observer observed a 
     bright spot east of Picard. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=330 and the 
     weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-17 UT 20:06-20:33 Ill=29% Unknown observed by Unknown_Observer on 1900-11-26

     In 1900 Nov 26 at UT 19:00? an unknown observer (in Europe) observed a 
     suspicious obscuring phenom on a dark plain (mare). The cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=307 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-17 UT 20:12-20:33 Ill=29% Grimaldi observed by Johnson_LT on 1951-3-13

     1951 Mar 13 UT 01:35:50 L.T.Johnson (USA) observed a faint flash 
     near W limb in earthshine - just S of Grimaldi. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2018-Jul-18 UT 20:05-20:10 Ill=39% Proclus observed by Cook_MC on 1985-4-25

     Almost certainly the following was spurious colour and not
     a TLP. Proclus was found to be brighter than Censorinus. 
     Red was seen on the northern inner floor and blue on the
     edge of the external north rim NNE-NW. The rim to the SW
     could not be seen. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-18 UT 20:25-20:52 Ill=40% Aristarchus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2018-Jul-18 UT 20:25-20:52 Ill=40% Campanus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johnson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2018-Jul-18 UT 20:25-20:52 Ill=40% Hecataeus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2018-Jul-18 UT 20:25-20:52 Ill=40% Hevelius observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2018-Jul-19 UT 20:04-20:34 Ill=50% W_Limb observed by Vince_AW on 1948-4-15

     In 1948 Apr 15 at UT 20:00? Vince (England, UK) observed a bright spot, 
     about magnitude 3, in Earthshine, about 30deg north of Grimaldi., on 
     the west limb (90W, 25N). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=503 and the 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Jul-19 UT 20:04-20:18 Ill=50% Aristarchus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2018-Jul-19 UT 20:04-20:18 Ill=50% Campanus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2018-Jul-19 UT 20:04-20:18 Ill=50% Hecataeus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2018-Jul-19 UT 20:04-20:18 Ill=50% Hevelius observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2018-Jul-19 UT 22:12-22:58 Ill=51% Mare_Crisium observed by Madej_P on 1982-7-27 *

     On 1982 Jul 27 at UT 20:04 P. Madej (Newsome, Huddersfield, UK, 16cm 
     reflector, x33, seeing I to II, transparency fair, Hoya linear type 
     polarizer filter) observed that when the filter was used on Mare 
     Crisium, that the north part became a bright gray when turned to 45deg, 
     but when turned the other way it returned to normal. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2018-Jul-20 UT 20:03-21:18 Ill=61% W_Limb observed by Barrett on 1973-12-2

     On 1973 Dec 02 at UT 22:17:33 Barrett and Brick (New York, 3.5" Questar 
     freflector) observed an occultation of Kappa Aquari, a wide double 
     star, on the western limb. The star faded perceptably before 
     disappearing. Cameron says that the fact that the star was a double was 
     not an explanation - she says that there are many reports of similar 
     fades for single stars. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1384 and weight=4. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-20 UT 20:03-20:17 Ill=61% Aristarchus observed by Mobberley_M on 1985-4-27

     Mobberley and Foley note that Aristarchus was very
     prominent in Earhshine. Little other detail seen
     in Earthshine other than the limb. The Cameron
     2006 extension catalog then says: "Confirm moving 
     side to side. Saw bright blue spot in center" however 
     it is unclear whether this refers to Aristarchus,
     or Torricelli-B - the latter was also undergoing a TLP
     at this time. Cameron 2006 extension catalog ID=267
     and weight=5 (confirmed?). 


2018-Jul-20 UT 20:03-20:17 Ill=61% W_Limb observed by Mobberley_M on 1985-4-27

     On 1985 Apr 27 UT 22:00 M. Mobberley (Suffolk, UK) could not see much 
     detail in Earthshine (apart from Aristarchus), except that there was a 
     brightness on the western limb of the Moon. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=267 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-20 UT 20:03-20:56 Ill=61% Mons_Piton observed by Louderback_D on 1986-10-11

     On 1985 Oct 11 at UT 04:56-05:12 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     4" refractor, x95, seeing=1-2-1 and transparency=4) detected a change 
     in brightness of Mons Piton point D (his designation) during 04:56-
     04:59. The whole of the east slope was affected - initially bright and 
     then faded and there was a blue colour (detected with filters). The 
     variabilty was 8-11sec (Cameron suspects atmosphere as the altitude was 
     low). The brightness stabilized at 05:12UT, but variability resumed 
     until observing finished. As a comparison Aristillus was not seen to 
     change. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=287 and the weight=1. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2018-Jul-20 UT 20:03-20:41 Ill=61% Earthshine observed by Spellman_R on 2004-11-20

     2004 Nov 20 UT 02:34:03 R. Spellman (120mm F8.3 refractor at prime 
     focus,  PC23C CCTV camera, via a DVD recorder) recorded a flash of 
     light. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Jul-21 UT 20:02-20:36 Ill=70% Tycho observed by Spellman_R on 1996-4-27

     1996 Apr 27 UTC 02:26-03:14 Observed by Spellman (Los Angeles, CA, USA)
     " 02:26 U.T. Sunrise on Tycho 3/4 of the crater was in shadow, 
     topmost section of the central peak was in sunlight. In white light 
     brightness of the central peak rivaled the brightness of the Eastern
     (sunlit) wall. No change was detected in red light, however in blue 
     light definite strong darkening was observed. Blink obtained when 
     viewing thru 25A and 38 filters. At 2:52 U.T. in the poor to fair 
     seeing the apparent size of the central peak in white and red light was 
     the same, in blue light the central peak in white and red light was the 
     same, in blue light the central peak size shrank to 1/2 white and red 
     size (and brightness). Also appearing sharper. Comparison was made also 
     with the central peak of Alphonsus, no changes were observed. The 
     significant part of the observation was the relative brightness of the 
     central peak to the sunlit rim in white and red light, they appeared 
     almost identical with the crater rim, being just slightly brighter. In 
     blue light the brightness of the central peak was reduced by at least 
     half while the rim brightness was not, (relative to one another). I 
     strongly believe that this was a real event. The shadow filled 
     portion of Tycho was examined for any abnormalities but none 
     were observed. Observations were ended shortly after 3:14 U.T. due to 
     clouds. I also conducted about 20 Moon blink observations during this 
     observing run and got the same strong reaction each time." ALPO/BAA
     weight=3.


2018-Jul-21 UT 20:02-21:43 Ill=70% Alphonsus observed by Brook_C on 2001-6-29 *

     On 2001 Jun 29 at UT22:16-22:22 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, 60mm refractor, 
     x120, no spurious colour seen, seeing I) observed that the central 
     peaks of Alphonsus looked bright at 22:16UT but had dimmed by 22:22UT. 
     The three dark patches on the floor of Alphonsus were clearly seen. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-21 UT 20:02-21:43 Ill=70% Arzachel observed by Brook_C on 2001-6-29 *

     On 2001 Jun 29 at UT 22:16-22:20 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, seeing 
     conditions very good, x120) reported that the central peak of Alphonsus 
     was brighter than the central peak of Arzachel (or was it the other way 
     around?). Cook observed 4 hours later from Washington DC, USA and found 
     that on CCD images that the central peak of Alphonsus was only slightly 
     less than that of Arzachel. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Jul-22 UT 20:01-20:46 Ill=79% Plato observed by Bartlett on 1968-10-1

     On 1968 Oct 01 at UT 21:00? Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA) and Beck 
     (Ohio, USA, x437) observed  lack of detail on the floor of Plato, 
     however the wall of the crater was easily resolved. Cameron says that 
     this was an independent confirmation. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1092 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3. 


2018-Jul-22 UT 20:40-21:18 Ill=79% Linne observed by Dawes on 1867-3-15

     Linne 1867 Mar 15 UT 20:00? Observed by Dawes (England?) "Excessively 
     minute black dot in middle of feature. A geom. fig. boarded & centered 
     with black that formed, dissolved & formed again" NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #150.


2018-Jul-23 UT 22:54-00:43 Ill=87% Ross_D observed by Harris on 1964-6-21 *

     On 1964 Jun 21 at UT 03:43-05:44 Harris, Cross and Helland (Whittier, 
     CA, USA, 19" reflector) observed south of Ross D: "Moving dark area". 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=819 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2018-Jul-24 UT 19:58-20:24 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Lipskii on 1964-6-21 *

     On 1964 Jun 21 at UT 21:18 Lipskii and Pospergelis (Shternberg State 
     Ast. Institute, AZI-2" reflector (Cass.) observed Aristarchus: 
     "Polarization meas. with electron polarimeter. Plane of polariz. 
     rotated 2deg fr. the adjacent areas. They interpret it as some 
     scattering medium over the crater. (Source gave date as 6/31/64, 
     misprint =21st?)". The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=820 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4. 


2018-Jul-25 UT 21:38-01:34 Ill=97% Unknown observed by Miranova on 1960-9-4 *

     On 1960 Sep 04 at UT00:00? Miranova (Russia or Israel) observed a TLP 
     at an unnamed lunar feature: "Spectral photom. of some lunar obj. in 
     4250, > 5000A bands. Spectral plates". Cameron suspects luminescence? 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=730 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-25 UT 23:57-02:08 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1964-6-23 *

     On 1964 Jun 23 at UT 04:45-05:05 Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA, 5" 
     reflector, x180, S=4-1 and T=3) observed a blue-violet glare on the 
     north east rim and a strong violet tinge in the nimbus. The effect was 
     absent 1 hour earlier. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=821 and weight=4. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Jul-26 UT 20:14-21:19 Ill=99% Moretus observed by Webb_TW on 1871-12-25 *

     Moretus? 1871 Dec 25 UTC 22:00? Observed by Webb? (England?, 9" 
     reflector?) "Internal twilight in crater #132- a large circular crater 
     nr. S.pole (crater #132 on Goodacre's map is Plato. Webb's map?)" NASA 
     catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #173.


2018-Jul-26 UT 22:10-02:04 Ill=99% Riccioli observed by Brittman_O on 1964-6-24 *

     During an eclipse of the Moon the crater appeared normal until it
     emerged from the shadow. In the north east the dark floor was
     not its normal hue and two light areas appeared to join. The
     emerging patches became less and less bright, finally disappearing
     at 0345 UT when the crater returned to normal. Cameron 2006 catalog 
     extension ID=10 and weight=2. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Jul-27 UT 20:40-21:02 Ill=100% Copernicus observed by Beccaria on 1772-10-11 *

     Bright spot (4th magnitude) seen on eclipsed Moon
     and glimmering specks. Seen by nephew and neice of Beccaria.
     Cameron 1978 catalog weight=4. ALPO/BAA catalog weight=2.


2018-Jul-27 UT 20:40-22:14 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Airy on 1877-8-23 *

     On 1877 Aug 23/24 at UT 23:10-01:00 Airy, Pratt and Capron (Greenwich, 
     England, France) observed during a lunar eclipse an unusual spectrum 
     with strong absorption in yellow. (Airy) 2 patches of crimson light of 
     short duration. Cameron says that this is a confirmation observation 
     and that Airy was the Astronomer Royal. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=197 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2018-Jul-27 UT 20:40-21:18 Ill=100% Eratosthenes observed by Haas_W on 1949-10-7 *

     Eratosthenes 1949 Oct 07 UT 04:14-05:22 W.Haas (USA) and O'Toole 
     (USA) observed some changes in intensity of features inside this 
     crater - after a lunar umbral passage. The effect lessened over 
     time. Comparisons had been made with measured intensities on the 
     previous and subsequent nights and on other months around the 
     time of Full Moon. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-27 UT 20:40-21:30 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Budine on 1964-12-19 *

     On 1964 Dec 19 at UT 03:13-03:14 Budine and Farrell (Binghamton, New 
     York, USA, 4" refractor, x200, S=7, T=5) observed that Aristarchus 
     brightened five times over 1 minute during a lunar eclipse. The cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=870 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Jul-27 UT 20:40-00:14 Ill=100% Grimaldi observed by Azevado on 1964-6-25 *

     On 1964 Jun 25 at UT ~01:07 Rubens de Azevedo (Brazil) observed 
     a white streak from Grimaldi on the limb, during an eclipse. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=822 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Jul-27 UT 23:11-00:14 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Titulaer_C on 1964-6-25 *

     On 1964 Jun 25 at UT ~01:07 Titulaer (Utrecht, the 
     Netherlands) observed that Aristarchus crater was very bright 
     during an eclipse. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=822 and weight=4. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-28 UT 00:02-01:39 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Moye on 1905-2-19 *

     On 1905 at Feb 19 at UT 18:00-19:03 Moye (Montpelier, France) observed 
     Aristarchus shining as a star in the dark, during a lunar eclipse. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=320 and he weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Jul-28 UT 00:14-01:07 Ill=100% Atlas observed by Chernov on 1950-4-2 *

     In 1950 Apr 02 at UT 20:00 Chernov (Russia) observed two dark spots in 
     Atlas during a penumbral phase of a lunar eclipse to quickly darken and 
     become sharp in detail. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=524 and weight=1. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-28 UT 02:09-02:28 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Cameron_W on 1968-4-13 *

     On 1968 Apr 13 at UT05:00-05:45 Cameron and Laczo (Greenbelt, MD, USA, 
     6" refractor, x50, 36" reflector x400, 12" reflector x80, seeing= 
     excellent) observed for the folliwing craters: Aristarchus, Pytheas, 
     Euler?, Censorinus, Plinius?, Proclus, Menelaus, Manilius: "Star-like 
     pts. in the craters. Only Aris. identified certainly, rest fairly 
     certain except Euler & Plinius. Seen in 6-in refr. at 50x but not in 
     36-in refl. at 400x where they were bright, but not star-lie pts. Seen 
     later in 12-in refl. at 80x. In another bldg. Seen 1st @ 1/2h before 
     totality ended, but not earlier dur. tot. tho't by author (WSC) to be 
     geom. & instrumental = power effect". Chilton, K.E. reports in RASCJ 
     that another observer did not report any of what the Greenbelt observers
     saw at all?The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1065 and weight=4. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-29 UT 00:05-03:28 Ill=99% Proclus observed by Green_SM on 1938-11-8 *

     Proclus 1938 Nov 08 UTC 20:00 Observed by Green (England? Seeing = 
     good) "2 bright spots in Schmidt & Wilkins' craterlets. Was struck by 
     whitish aspect of parts of floor -- possibly mists. S.wall concealed by 
     these strong white patches, as if breached ring." NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #443.


2018-Jul-29 UT 01:20-02:00 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1965-11-10

     Aristarchus & A 1965 Nov 10 UTC 01:25-01:57 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 4" reflector, S=6, T=6) "Viol. tinge & radiance 
     around nimbus; used red filter. Aris. A became larger." NASA catalog 
     weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID #913.


2018-Jul-29 UT 01:25-02:17 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-18

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 18 UTC 09:54 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness of the area of over a mag. during the nite. 
     Recorded at Vmag=3.56 first, & a few min(?) later at 4.62. It was .95 
     mag. brighter (@2.5x) than av. for that age & then returned to 
     normal." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID #762.


2018-Jul-29 UT 01:32-04:31 Ill=99% Macrobius observed by McLeod on 1938-11-8 *

     Macrobius 1938 Nov 08 UTC 18:00? Observed by McLeod (England? 5" ? 
     reflector) "Changes in dark areas. (near Proclus where Green saw 
     phenomenom. see #443)" NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #
     444.


2018-Jul-29 UT 01:40-02:17 Ill=99% Proclus observed by Darling_D on 1989-2-22

     On 1989 Feb 22 at UT03:48-03:58 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 3" 
     refractor, x56, seeing=4/10 and transparency=4) found that the floor of 
     Proclus was a "uniform grey" shade and the east wall was bright. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=357 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-29 UT 21:36-21:43 Ill=96% Lichtenberg observed by Barcroft on 1940-10-18 *

     Lichtenberg area 1940 Oct 18 UT 07:11 Observed by Barcroft 
     (Madera, CA, USA, 6" reflector) "Pronouced reddish-brown or 
     orange color, less marked on next nite, & slight on 22nd, see 
     #'s 477, 478." NASA catalog weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2. NASA 
     catalog ID #476.


2018-Jul-29 UT 23:55-00:16 Ill=96% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-19

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 19 UTC 07:30 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness from Vmag=3.46 to V=3.07, where av. mag. for that 
     age=3.26, or a brightening of .58 mag." NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog ID #763.


2018-Jul-30 UT 01:19-02:34 Ill=96% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-19

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 19 UTC 09:48 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness from Vmag=3.46 to V=3.07, where av. mag. for that 
     age=3.26, or a brightening of .58 mag." NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog ID #763.


2018-Jul-30 UT 02:00-03:46 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Moseley_R on 1984-11-10

     On 1984 Nov 10 at UT19:15-19:50 R. Moseley (Coventry, UK, the Moon's 
     altitude was low) noticed that the region from the central peak and 
     over and onto the east wall looked unusual. 8 bands were visible, "two 
     on E. wall of c.p. strongest, surrounding collar grey increasing 
     intensely outward. Band at 2 o'clock position was very dark. Bright 
     spot on W. wall at 4 o'clock position." A sketch was made that 
     illustrates bands on either side with bright patch. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=252 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2018-Jul-31 UT 00:20-00:53 Ill=91% Posidonius observed by Schmidt_J on 1849-2-11

     Posidonius 1849 Feb 11 UT 02:00? Observed by Schmidt (Athens, Greece, 
     7" refractor) "Bright little crater in it was shadowless. Schroter saw 
     repeated changes in it & others & once saw this crater's shadow 
     replaced by a gray veil. Gruithuisen saw the same thing as Schroter in 
     1821." NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID #128. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2018-Jul-31 UT 00:48-02:17 Ill=91% Aristarchus observed by Brook_C on 2002-5-30

     On 2002 May 30 at UT02:30-02:44 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK) suspected that 
     Aristarchus crater looked dimmer than normal. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Jul-31 UT 02:10-04:33 Ill=91% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1975-11-21 *

     Aristarchus 1975 Nov 18-19 UT 23:30-00:30? Observed by Foley (Kent, 
     England, 12" reflector) "Deep blue-viol. spot in NW (IAU ?) interior 
     corner. (seen occasionally with obscur. but dates not given)." NASA 
     catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1421."


2018-Jul-31 UT 03:35-04:33 Ill=91% Plato observed by Marshall on 1984-11-11

     On 1984 Nov 11 at UT21:00? Marshall (England) noted that there was no 
     normal brightness on the floor to most southernmost craterlet. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=253 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.