TLP Repeat Illumination/Libration and Earthshine predictions for: Australia NSW Sydney



Ill is percentage illumination of the Moon
*Indicates a repeat illumination and libration event to within +/- 1 deg for both
A non-* indicates just repeat illumination to within +/-0.5 deg


2020-Jan-01 UT 09:05-09:59 Ill=33% Aristarchus observed by _R_ on 1883-11-5

     A German observer by the pseudonym of "R" on 1883 Nov 05 UT 18:00 saw 
     Aristarchus as a vry bright 7-8th magnitude star in the dark part of 
     the Moon. The Cameron 1978 catalog assigns this event an ID of 240 and 
     a weight of 3. The ALPO/BAA weight is 1.


2020-Jan-01 UT 09:05-09:19 Ill=33% Posidonius observed by McConnell_J on 1968-4-3

     Posidonius 1968 Apr 03/04 UT 22:29-00:15 Observed by McConnell 
     (Antrim, N.Ireland, 3.5" refractor, x117, S=E) "Peculiarhaziness 
     in NE (ast. ?) corner of crater. Greenish-yellow tint similar to 
     M.Crisium at FM. Central crater was clearly vis. N.wall showed 
     no detail at all." NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1064. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-01 UT 09:05-09:32 Ill=33% Aristarchus observed by Miles_H on 1985-4-25

     On 1985 Apr 25 at UT 21:34-22:04 H. Miles (England) observed 
     Aristarchus within Earthshine. Foley (Kent, UK, 12" reflector) had 
     observed it one hour prior to Miles and found it to be both dull and 
     blue - with a bright patch west of the crater on Aristarchus Upsilon 
     Mountain. At 21:45UT 6 star-like flashes seen on the floor. They 
     occurred again a few minutes later and repeated at 22:04UT.By 21:45UT 
     the bright patch had gone though. Smith (England) had also apparently 
     seen the flashes and a further glow, albeit more north of the one seen 
     by Foley. Miles confirmed Smith's glow north of Aristarchus. 
     Peters did not see much, indeed found Aristarchus to be quite 
     faint (2130-2141). The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=264 and the 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 09:05-09:48 Ill=33% Proclus observed by Cook_MC on 1985-4-25

     Almost certainly the following was spurious colour and not
     a TLP. Proclus was found to be brighter than Censorinus. 
     Red was seen on the northern inner floor and blue on the
     edge of the external north rim NNE-NW. The rim to the SW
     could not be seen. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-01 UT 09:05-09:32 Ill=33% Torricelli_B observed by Cook_MC on 1985-4-25

     Curious lack of detail, but this may have been related to
     the seeing. Of greater interest though was a dark blue
     splodge where the crater should have been. Shadow seen through
     this splodge, but no crater rim seen.


2020-Jan-01 UT 10:30-11:31 Ill=33% Aristarchus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 10:30-11:31 Ill=33% Campanus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johnson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 10:30-11:31 Ill=33% Hecataeus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 10:30-11:31 Ill=33% Hevelius observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 09:39-11:33 Ill=34% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-02 UT 09:05-10:08 Ill=42% Aristarchus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-02 UT 09:05-10:08 Ill=42% Campanus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-02 UT 09:05-10:08 Ill=42% Hecataeus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-02 UT 09:05-10:08 Ill=42% Hevelius observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-02 UT 09:20-10:07 Ill=42% W_Limb observed by Vince_AW on 1948-4-15

     In 1948 Apr 15 at UT 20:00? Vince (England, UK) observed a bright spot, 
     about magnitude 3, in Earthshine, about 30deg north of Grimaldi., on 
     the west limb (90W, 25N). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=503 and the 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-02 UT 11:36-11:59 Ill=43% Unknown observed by Gaboreau on 1895-9-25

     On 1895 Sep 25 at UT 20:00? Gaboreau (Paris, France) observed on the 
     Moon s shaft of light (same observation as Cameron's TLP report #281 
     and further more it is on the same day and month as it was back in 
     1893. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=286 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-02 UT 09:39-12:01 Ill=43% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-03 UT 09:05-10:18 Ill=52% Aristarchus observed by Mobberley_M on 1985-4-27

     Mobberley and Foley note that Aristarchus was very
     prominent in Earhshine. Little other detail seen
     in Earthshine other than the limb. The Cameron
     2006 extension catalog then says: "Confirm moving 
     side to side. Saw bright blue spot in center" however 
     it is unclear whether this refers to Aristarchus,
     or Torricelli-B - the latter was also undergoing a TLP
     at this time. Cameron 2006 extension catalog ID=267
     and weight=5 (confirmed?). 


2020-Jan-03 UT 09:05-10:18 Ill=52% W_Limb observed by Mobberley_M on 1985-4-27

     On 1985 Apr 27 UT 22:00 M. Mobberley (Suffolk, UK) could not see much 
     detail in Earthshine (apart from Aristarchus), except that there was a 
     brightness on the western limb of the Moon. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=267 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-03 UT 09:05-09:07 Ill=52% Proclus observed by Cook_MC on 1993-5-28

     On 1993 May 28 at UT 21:02-21:30 M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, 3.3" Questar 
     telescope, x80-x130, atmosphere hazey - poor transparency) noticed that 
     the east side rims were slightly fuzzy and suspects that this might 
     have been due to the illumination angle. A.C. Cook (Frimley, UK) 
     obtained some CCD images that revealed that the effect was to some 
     extent still there one hour later. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=461 and 
     the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-03 UT 09:26-11:13 Ill=52% Mons_Piton observed by Louderback_D on 1986-10-11

     On 1985 Oct 11 at UT 04:56-05:12 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     4" refractor, x95, seeing=1-2-1 and transparency=4) detected a change 
     in brightness of Mons Piton point D (his designation) during 04:56-
     04:59. The whole of the east slope was affected - initially bright and 
     then faded and there was a blue colour (detected with filters). The 
     variabilty was 8-11sec (Cameron suspects atmosphere as the altitude was 
     low). The brightness stabilized at 05:12UT, but variability resumed 
     until observing finished. As a comparison Aristillus was not seen to 
     change. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=287 and the weight=1. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-03 UT 10:07-11:12 Ill=52% W_Limb observed by Barrett on 1973-12-2

     On 1973 Dec 02 at UT 22:17:33 Barrett and Brick (New York, 3.5" Questar 
     freflector) observed an occultation of Kappa Aquari, a wide double 
     star, on the western limb. The star faded perceptably before 
     disappearing. Cameron says that the fact that the star was a double was 
     not an explanation - she says that there are many reports of similar 
     fades for single stars. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1384 and weight=4. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-03 UT 11:13-13:40 Ill=52% Ptolemaeus observed by Cook_AC on 1978-4-15 *

     Ptolemaeus 1978 Apr 15 UTC 21:54-22:20 Observed by A.Cook 
     (Frimley, Surrey, UK, 12" reflector x240, S=IV (Antoniadi)) 
     "Small triangular area on the NW floor of the crater, at the 
     foot of the rim, was slightly brighter in blue light than in red 
     (Moonblink used). Suspected this was due to the poor observing 
     conditions. Certainly blink reaction was not unmistakable". 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-03 UT 09:39-12:17 Ill=53% Earthshine: Quadrantids: ZHR=120 (vel=41km/s

2020-Jan-04 UT 09:06-10:16 Ill=61% Proclus observed by Westmoreland_S on 1972-7-19

     Proclus 1972 Jul 19 UT 21:24-21:30 observed by S.Westmoorland 
     (Cropwell-Bishop, UK, 15cm reflector, x48 & x96, image dull 
     but steady) observed a brilliant spot in the NE (IAU?) wall 
     which lasted for about 90 seconds. After fading it was 
     replaced by pulsations for a further 2 minutes. Clouds 
     prevented further observations. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-04 UT 09:06-11:54 Ill=61% Tycho observed by Spellman_R on 1996-4-27 *

     1996 Apr 27 UTC 02:26-03:14 Observed by Spellman (Los Angeles, CA, USA)
     " 02:26 U.T. Sunrise on Tycho 3/4 of the crater was in shadow, 
     topmost section of the central peak was in sunlight. In white light 
     brightness of the central peak rivaled the brightness of the Eastern
     (sunlit) wall. No change was detected in red light, however in blue 
     light definite strong darkening was observed. Blink obtained when 
     viewing thru 25A and 38 filters. At 2:52 U.T. in the poor to fair 
     seeing the apparent size of the central peak in white and red light was 
     the same, in blue light the central peak in white and red light was the 
     same, in blue light the central peak size shrank to 1/2 white and red 
     size (and brightness). Also appearing sharper. Comparison was made also 
     with the central peak of Alphonsus, no changes were observed. The 
     significant part of the observation was the relative brightness of the 
     central peak to the sunlit rim in white and red light, they appeared 
     almost identical with the crater rim, being just slightly brighter. In 
     blue light the brightness of the central peak was reduced by at least 
     half while the rim brightness was not, (relative to one another). I 
     strongly believe that this was a real event. The shadow filled 
     portion of Tycho was examined for any abnormalities but none 
     were observed. Observations were ended shortly after 3:14 U.T. due to 
     clouds. I also conducted about 20 Moon blink observations during this 
     observing run and got the same strong reaction each time." ALPO/BAA
     weight=3.


2020-Jan-04 UT 09:07-10:58 Ill=61% Alphonsus observed by Brook_C on 2001-6-29

     On 2001 Jun 29 at UT22:16-22:22 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, 60mm refractor, 
     x120, no spurious colour seen, seeing I) observed that the central 
     peaks of Alphonsus looked bright at 22:16UT but had dimmed by 22:22UT. 
     The three dark patches on the floor of Alphonsus were clearly seen. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-04 UT 09:07-10:58 Ill=61% Arzachel observed by Brook_C on 2001-6-29

     On 2001 Jun 29 at UT 22:16-22:20 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, seeing 
     conditions very good, x120) reported that the central peak of Alphonsus 
     was brighter than the central peak of Arzachel (or was it the other way 
     around?). Cook observed 4 hours later from Washington DC, USA and found 
     that on CCD images that the central peak of Alphonsus was only slightly 
     less than that of Arzachel. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-04 UT 09:39-12:21 Ill=62% Earthshine: Quadrantids: ZHR=120 (vel=41km/s

2020-Jan-04 UT 12:44-12:51 Ill=62% Proclus observed by Farrant_M on 1967-4-18

     Proclus 1967 Apr 18 UTC 18:40-18:45 Observed by Farrant (Cambridge, 
     England, 8" reflector x175) "Crater appeared quite dark, even bright 
     ring was subdued & seemed thicker than normal. Drawing." NASA catalog 
     weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1028. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-05 UT 09:20-11:09 Ill=71% Plato observed by Bartlett on 1968-10-1

     On 1968 Oct 01 at UT 21:00? Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA) and Beck 
     (Ohio, USA, x437) observed  lack of detail on the floor of Plato, 
     however the wall of the crater was easily resolved. Cameron says that 
     this was an independent confirmation. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1092 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3. 


2020-Jan-05 UT 11:00-12:53 Ill=71% Linne observed by Dawes on 1867-3-15

     Linne 1867 Mar 15 UT 20:00? Observed by Dawes (England?) "Excessively 
     minute black dot in middle of feature. A geom. fig. boarded & centered 
     with black that formed, dissolved & formed again" NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #150.


2020-Jan-06 UT 09:06-09:17 Ill=79% Plato observed by Watkins_E on 1972-1-26

     Plato and Plato A 1972 Jan 26 UT 18:25-18:55 Observed by Watkons and 
     Hunt (England, 4.5" reflector x150, x225, and a 2.75" refractor) "Misty 
     patch over A, & a misty brightness over SW wall of Plato. Hunt saw 
     nothing unusual." NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #1321.


2020-Jan-07 UT 09:06-09:58 Ill=87% Aristarchus observed by Lipskii on 1964-6-21

     On 1964 Jun 21 at UT 21:18 Lipskii and Pospergelis (Shternberg State 
     Ast. Institute, AZI-2" reflector (Cass.) observed Aristarchus: 
     "Polarization meas. with electron polarimeter. Plane of polariz. 
     rotated 2deg fr. the adjacent areas. They interpret it as some 
     scattering medium over the crater. (Source gave date as 6/31/64, 
     misprint =21st?)". The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=820 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4. 


2020-Jan-07 UT 09:06-09:14 Ill=87% Deslandres observed by Penzel_E on 1965-5-12

     On 1965 May 12 at UT 19:10 E. Penzel (Rodewisch, East Germany) was 
     taking a sequence of images during the impact of the Soviet Lunik 5. He 
     detected a tens of km scale elongated cloud after the impact over a 
     duration of 9.5 minutes. However there are differences between the 
     images elsewhere on the Moon, possibly due to different exposures or 
     some other effects and it is not 100% sure that what he detected was 
     impact debris/cloud?. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-07 UT 09:06-09:46 Ill=87% Gassendi observed by Rawlings_G on 1968-10-3

     Gassendi 1968 Oct 03/04 UT 19:30-19:50 & 00:20-01:40 Observed 
     by Rawlings (Aylesbury, UK, 6" reflector low magnification) 
     and by Moore (Selsey, Sussex, UK, 12.5" reflector, x360) 
     "Slight blink (Eng.) arcuate in shape, N. of c.p. (Rawlings 
     dubious). Moore, with blink device saw none at 0020-0140h. No 
     LTP in Gass., Ptol. or Aris. 5th or 6th.". NASA catalog 
     weight=1. NASA catalog ID #1093. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-07 UT 10:09-12:07 Ill=87% Herodotus observed by Haas_W on 2003-5-13

     On 2003 May 13 at UT06:40-07:26 W. Haas (Las Cruces, NM, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x321 and x202, S=2, T=3.5) suspected (06:40-06:55UT) that he 
     saw an oval bright feature (intensity 5.5) near the centre of the floor 
     of Herodotus crater indenting into the shadow - however the seeing was 
     none too good, so it is more of a suspicion than a definite sighting. 
     At 07:14-07:26UT he re-examined the region (x202 and x321, S=1-2 and T=
     3.5) and had better glimpses that conformed his initial suspicions of 
     there being an oval indentation bright spot (now intensity 6) into the 
     shadow in the centre of the floor. Of course Herodotus does not have a 
     central peak! There was also a very bright spot on the NW> sunlit rim 
     of Herodotus crater. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-07 UT 11:13-12:26 Ill=87% Bailly observed by Miles_H on 1965-5-12

     On 1965 May 12 at UT 22:20 H. Miles (UK) found a possible 
     obscuration in Bailly crater. Most of the region was as sharp as 
     normal, but the central area was greyish and blurred. Although 
     the observer concerned considered themselves a non-experienced 
     observer, another BAA Lunar Section observer saw the same 
     effect. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-07 UT 12:11-13:49 Ill=88% Herodotus observed by Wilkins_HP on 1950-3-30

     Herodotus 1950 Mar 30 UT 19:00? Observed by Wilkins (Kent, 
     UK, 15" reflector) "Transient c.p. (similar phen. to 
     Bartlett's in later yrs.? see #532). NASA catalog weight=4 
     (good). NASA catalog ID #523. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-07 UT 12:31-14:17 Ill=88% Herodotus observed by Bartlett on 1956-11-15

     Herodotus 1956 Nov 15 UT 01:05-01:30 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 3.5" reflector x100) "Pseudo c.p. clearly 
     seen est. I=5.5, wratten filters showed it neutral to green, 
     red, & yellow, but duller in blue. Floor est. 2deg, distinctly 
     olive-green. Precise time at 0117 at col. 55.27deg" NASA catalog 
     weight=4. NASA catalog ID #655. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-07 UT 13:17-14:17 Ill=88% Aristarchus observed by Darnella on 1967-4-21

     Aristarchus area 1967 Apr 21 UT 19:00-21:20 Observed by 
     Darnella (Copenhagen, Denmark, 3.5" refractor, S=1-2), 
     Farrant (Cambridge, England, 8" reflector, x160), Corralitos 
     Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector with 
     Moonblink) "On exterior wall of Aris., 3 pts. in Cobra Head & 
     banks of valley were star-like & glowing; & Herod. were red. 
     Farrant could not bring hill N. of Herod. into focus. He says
     color was deep red-orange & steady for 3 min. Started at 
     1915h (1916-1925h seeing was too bad) (indep. confirm.). 
     Suspected next nite but bad seeing. Not confirmed by 
     Corralitos MB." NASA catalog weight=5. NASA catalog ID #1030. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-07 UT 13:54-14:17 Ill=88% Herodotus observed by Hill_H on 1966-11-24

     Herodotus 1966 Nov 24 UT 21:50 H.Hill (UK, 7.25" reflector, 
     x240), seeing 4-6/10, transparancy 4/5) sketched a central white 
     diffuse patch inside the floor of the crater, with a size of 
     about 1/7th the diameter of the crater. The eastern edge of the 
     white patch was encroached by the shadow of the eastern rim. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-08 UT 09:06-09:52 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by Yamada on 1963-12-28

     Aristarchus, Herodotus 1963 Dec 28 UTC 15:55-16:26 Observered by Yamada 
     et al, (Hiroshima, Japan, 10" reflector, x278) "Red area, spreading to 
     Herod., a perculiar obscuring gray area on N. edge of glow. Drawing. 
     (confirm. of Olivarez? with activit > 1/2 day?)."NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very high). NASA catalog ID #789.


2020-Jan-08 UT 09:06-09:52 Ill=93% Herodotus observed by Yamada on 1963-12-28

     Aristarchus, Herodotus 1963 Dec 28 UTC 15:55-16:26 Observered by Yamada 
     et al, (Hiroshima, Japan, 10" reflector, x278) "Red area, spreading to 
     Herod., a perculiar obscuring gray area on N. edge of glow. Drawing. 
     (confirm. of Olivarez? with activit > 1/2 day?)."NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very high). NASA catalog ID #789. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-08 UT 09:06-09:34 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by De_Groof on 1987-3-13

     On 1987 Mar 13 at UT02:00-03:00 De Groof (Belgium, 8" reflector x150, 
     seeing=clear) noted that the north west part of Aristarchus had a blood 
     red shimmering filling the whole crater. A video by Mobberley some 18 
     hours later, shows variation in Aristarchus. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=
     301 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-08 UT 09:12-12:48 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by Amery_GW on 1978-4-20 *

     Amery (Reading, England) saw blue in Aristarchus but a photograph did 
     not show the colour. Foley thinks this was spurious colour. Cameron 
     2006 extension catalog ID=27. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-08 UT 09:12-12:48 Ill=93% Promontorium_Laplace observed by Foley_PW on 1978-4-20 *

     Peter Foley observed a tiny yellow-brown region close
     to the tip of the cape, north east of the precipitous west
     edge, in the face of the north facing slope. The area
     concerned was diffuse and varied in density despite
     the surroundings not varying. Foley notcied no colour
     elsewhere on the Moon, though Amery thought that he saw
     some in Aristarchus, but Foley thinks this was spurious.
     Cameron 2006 catalog extension ID=27 and weight=5.
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-08 UT 09:15-11:13 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by Moseley_R on 1983-12-17

     On 1983 Dec 17 at UT 17:25-19:20 Moseley (Covington, England, UK, x120 
     and x240, seeing=III and spurious colour present) found that the inside 
     of Aristarchus crater was dull and slightly blue. Suspected the colour 
     to be spurious: at 19:20 at x240 the colour was pink but at x120 there 
     was no colour. Cameron 2006 catalof ID=234 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2. 


2020-Jan-08 UT 13:25-14:55 Ill=94% Unknown observed by Miranova on 1960-9-4

     On 1960 Sep 04 at UT00:00? Miranova (Russia or Israel) observed a TLP 
     at an unnamed lunar feature: "Spectral photom. of some lunar obj. in 
     4250, > 5000A bands. Spectral plates". Cameron suspects luminescence? 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=730 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-08 UT 13:46-14:54 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Cross on 1967-11-15

     Aristarchus-Cobra Head, 1967 Nov 15 UT 05:40-06:00 Observed by Cross, 
     Tombaugh (Las Cruces, NM, 12" reflector x800) and Harris (Tucson, AZ), 
     and Dunlap (Organ Pass, NM, 24" reflector with Moonblink). "Obs. 
     reddish color N. & E. of Aris. & more intense color nr. E.(IAU?) rim of 
     Cobra Head. Red color nr.C.H. confirmed by Tombaugh. Obtained 10 photos 
     between 0543-0549h in 3 spectral bands (blue, yellow, red, & integ. 
     light). No change dur. obs. per. but spot got smaller at moments of 
     good seeing. Isodensitometry of photos. At Corralitos 0152-0155 on 24-
     in image intensifier & filter sys. photoos at 0320-0330h. Harris at 
     Tucson got spectra. Neither of latter 2 show anything unusual. Its 
     edges were nebulous even at best seeing. Size @ that of Cobra's Head." 
     NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA catalog ID #1053.


2020-Jan-08 UT 14:29-14:55 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1975-5-23

     Aristarchus 1975 May 23 P.W. Foley (Wilmington, UK, 12" 
     reflector, x200, x360, x624, atmospheric clarity good, seeing 
     III from 20:15-22:30, but the clouded out at 22:30, and from 
     23:15-01:15 seeing was IV-V with poor transparency) observed 
     (22:20-20:45 UT) variation in the SE corner of the 
     Aristarchus, namely the usual dark bands were alternating 
     light to dark, not in keeping with otyher crater features. 
     This effect was not linked to atmospheric turbulence. Also 
     projected image of bands beyond the crater W. wall were 
     repeatedly noted. The observer broke away from observing at 
     20:45UT to make a telephonealert call. At 20:55UT they noted 
     that the area between Vallis Schroteri and Herodotus seemed 
     very light/bright, also the E. exterior of the crater wall of 
     Herodotus. From 21:01-21:11 A slight blueness was seen to 
     extend from the NE corner of Aristarchus, along the exterior 
     rim, acrossand beyond Herodotus to the SW. A tgorough search 
     was made of many bright areas, both near the terminator and to 
     the E., but no blueness could be detected elsewhere. A slight 
     orange hue was noted along the E. limb of theMoon (Spurious 
     colour). From 21:18;22:30 Aristarchus seemed normal again, and 
     likewise the head of Vallis Schoteri too. The observer was 
     clouded out from 22:30-23:15and from 23:15-01:30 the seeing 
     was so appaling that no colour or projection of the bands 
     could be seen. A Moon Blink was used during the session, but 
     no colour was detected in this? Another observer, R.W. Rose 
     (Devon, UK) observed 21:20-21:30 but had IV seeing, and saw 
     nothing unusual, but commented that if TLP wactivity had been 
     taking place, then they would probably not have seen it. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-08 UT 14:43-14:55 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Schobel on 1967-4-22

     Aristarchus-herodotus 1967 Apr 22 UT 20:20 Observed by Schobel 
     (Hirschfelde, Germany, 5"? refractor) "Interference filter. 
     (indep. confirm. of Darnella?)" NASA catalog weight=5. NASA 
     catalog ID #1032. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-09 UT 09:06-11:11 Ill=98% Plato observed by Mannheim_Observers on 1788-12-11 *

     Bright point seen on the dark part.
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID is 38 and the weight
     assigned is 5.


2020-Jan-09 UT 10:00-11:57 Ill=98% Moretus observed by Webb_TW on 1871-12-25

     Moretus? 1871 Dec 25 UTC 22:00? Observed by Webb? (England?, 9" 
     reflector?) "Internal twilight in crater #132- a large circular crater 
     nr. S.pole (crater #132 on Goodacre's map is Plato. Webb's map?)" NASA 
     catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #173.


2020-Jan-09 UT 10:12-11:25 Ill=98% Helicon observed by Caruso_J on 1979-8-7

     The area west of Helicon not visible despite the area being 
     fairly bright at Full Moon time. This area was a very bright 
     patch one night. Cameron notes: comensurability of Full Moon & 
     Perigee. Cameron 2006 catalog extension ID=64 and weight=3. 
     Seeing=7 and transparency=4. 2.4" refractor used. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-09 UT 10:57-12:13 Ill=98% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Pickering_WH on 1892-5-10

     On 1892 May 10th at 19:00UT? Pickering, based at Arequipa. Peru, using 
     a 12" reflector, saw varitions in vapor col. Drawings were made. Time 
     calculated from the given colongitude. Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and 
     weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-09 UT 13:33-15:20 Ill=98% Unknown observed by Miranova on 1960-9-5

     On 1960 Sep 04 at UT00:00? Miranova (Russia or Israel) observed a TLP 
     at an unnamed lunar feature: "Spectral photom. of some lunar obj. in 
     4250, > 5000A bands. Spectral plates". Cameron suspects luminescence? 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=730 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-09 UT 13:42-14:05 Ill=98% Plato observed by Chapman on 1982-6-5

     On 1982 Jun 05 at 22:00? UT, Chapman (UK, using a 12" reflector), again 
     using a x2 yellow filter, noticed that the central craterlet 
     detectabilty changed such that sometimes it was visible and sometimes 
     not. Foley (Kent, UK)noticed that the central craterlet could only just 
     be seen between June 2 to June 5 and was much less discernable than 
     during the previous lunation. No CED brightness measurements made. The 
     floor of Plato was noted to be very dark though. Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=172 and weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-09 UT 14:13-15:42 Ill=98% Riccioli observed by Brittman_O on 1964-6-24

     During an eclipse of the Moon the crater appeared normal until it
     emerged from the shadow. In the north east the dark floor was
     not its normal hue and two light areas appeared to join. The
     emerging patches became less and less bright, finally disappearing
     at 0345 UT when the crater returned to normal. Cameron 2006 catalog 
     extension ID=10 and weight=2. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-09 UT 14:34-15:42 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Weresuik on 1965-5-15

     Aristarchus 1965 May 15 UTC 01:40-02:15 Observed by Weresuik, McClench, 
     Johnson (Pt. Tobacco, MD, USA, 16" reflector x240, S=F, T=G) and Delano 
     (Massachusetts, USA, 12" reflector). "Crater had color(red?) detected 
     by Trident MB & photos were obtained. There were pulsations. Delano saw 
     E. wall of crater unusually bright (confirm. if at same time)." NASA 
     catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA catalog ID #876.


2020-Jan-09 UT 14:48-15:42 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Doherty_BT on 1963-12-29

     1963Dec29/30 UT 22:00-03:00. Doherty (Small Thorne, UK) 8.5" 
     reflector, x110, x200 & x274, S=8-8.5, T=8, Moon 57 deg in alt) 
     and 3 others, using the same instrument, saw a bright purple-
     blue patch in Aristarchus. Other areas checked for colour and 
     none sen elsewhere. Attempts were made to contact observers 
     elsewhere but with no success. Sketch made and shows the patch 
     covering the floor area of Aristarchus and extending out beyond 
     the east rim. Patch was elliptical in shape and the semi-major 
     diameter was approximately 2/3rds of the diameter of 
     Aristarchus, or about 27 km. The event lasted 5 hours and 
     gradually faded. NASA catalog weight=5 (very high quality)". 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-10 UT 10:03-12:55 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Aristarchus 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by 
     Argentiere et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm 
     reflectors) Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) 
     during a  lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID 
     #658. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 10:03-12:55 Ill=100% Byrgius observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Byrgius 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere 
     et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm reflectors) 
     Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) during a  
     lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #658. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 10:03-12:55 Ill=100% Kepler observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Kepler 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere et 
     al. (France?) "Crater was extra-ordinarily bright". NASA catalog 
     weight=3 and catalog ID #658. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 10:03-12:55 Ill=100% Manilius observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Manilius 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere 
     et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm reflectors) 
     Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) during a  
     lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #658. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 10:03-12:55 Ill=100% Proclus observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Proclus 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere 
     et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm reflectors) 
     Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) during a  
     lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #658. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 10:03-12:55 Ill=100% Tycho observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Tycho 1956 Nov 17/18 UTC 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere et al. 
     (France?) "Crater was extra-ordinarily bright". NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #658.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:00-11:59 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Airy on 1877-8-23

     On 1877 Aug 23/24 at UT 23:10-01:00 Airy, Pratt and Capron (Greenwich, 
     England, France) observed during a lunar eclipse an unusual spectrum 
     with strong absorption in yellow. (Airy) 2 patches of crimson light of 
     short duration. Cameron says that this is a confirmation observation 
     and that Airy was the Astronomer Royal. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=197 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:00-12:07 Ill=100% Janssen observed by Taylor_AR on 1964-12-19

     On 1964 Dec 19 at UT 01:55 A.R.Taylor (London, UK) suspected 
     a brief pinpoint of light near Janssen (unconfirmed). The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:00-12:47 Ill=100% Mare_Nubium observed by Sunduleak on 1964-12-19

     On 1964 Dec 19 at UT 03:28-04:28 Sunduleak and Stock (Cerro-Tololo, 
     Chile, 16" reflector) using photoelectric photometry during a lunar 
     eclipse, observed on the northern edge of Mare Numbium, and south of 
     Copernicus (20W, 0N), a strong anomalous enhancement of radiation 
     (confirmation according to Cameron). On 1964 Dec 19 at UT 02:35 S.J. 
     Hill et al (Kitt Peak??) observed during a lunar eclipse an anomolous 
     bright area (location not given). Cameron says that this is an 
     independent confirmation of Sanduleak and Stock's TLP report. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=868 and 569 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=4.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:00-11:57 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Darling_D on 1982-12-30

     On 1982 Dec 30 at UT10:09-10:58 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x342, S=9/10) found that when the umbra of the eclipse 
     shadow transitted across Aristrachus, the crater was a bright blue - 
     this effect lasted until 10:14UT. Flashes/flickers (~0.1 sec duration) 
     were seen at 10:15UT. He saw another flash at 10:24UT. Another 
     observer, Harris (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 6" reflector, S=9/10) saw 
     flashes at 10:18 (9 or 10 magnitude) - he saw another 2 flashes at 
     10:34 - though the Cameron catalog does not state where on the Moon - 
     Aristarchus??. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=194 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3. 


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:00-11:57 Ill=100% Romer observed by Darling_D on 1982-12-30

     On 1982 Dec 30 at UT 10:09-10:58 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5" reflector, x342, seeing=9/10), during a total lunar eclipse, 
     found that Romer had a faint blue glow to it. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=194 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:08-13:06 Ill=100% Tycho observed by Fock on 1919-11-7

     On 1919 Nov 27 at UT 23:00-01:00 Fock (Germany) observed in the 
     vicinity of Tycho, during an eclipse (mid eclipse at 23:56UT) a long 
     ray in the direction of Longomontanus that remained visible. It was 
     glowing in weak gray-green colour for the whole of the eclipse. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=373 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:36-13:21 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1956-11-18

     On 1956 Nov 18 at UT 00:00? an unknown observer (Cameron gives an AGU 
     meeting reference) apparently saw a TLP in Aristarchus crater. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=657 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:36-15:17 Ill=100% Kepler observed by Wildey on 1962-7-17 *

     Kepler 1962 Jul 17 UTC 06:24,08:36 Observed by Wildey, Pohn (Mt Wilson, 
     CA, USA, 60" reflector+photometer) "Crater was at Vmag 2.68 at earlier 
     obs. which was .47 mag brighter than av. mag. at 15d & it faded to near 
     normal at later time to V=3.10(photom. measures), a change of 1/2 mag. 
     or @1.5 times in brightness" NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA 
     catalog ID #761.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:37-13:25 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Budine on 1964-12-19

     On 1964 Dec 19 at UT 03:13-03:14 Budine and Farrell (Binghamton, New 
     York, USA, 4" refractor, x200, S=7, T=5) observed that Aristarchus 
     brightened five times over 1 minute during a lunar eclipse. The cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=870 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 12:36-13:57 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Titulaer_C on 1964-6-25

     On 1964 Jun 25 at UT ~01:07 Titulaer (Utrecht, the 
     Netherlands) observed that Aristarchus crater was very bright 
     during an eclipse. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=822 and weight=4. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 12:36-13:57 Ill=100% Grimaldi observed by Azevado on 1964-6-25

     On 1964 Jun 25 at UT ~01:07 Rubens de Azevedo (Brazil) observed 
     a white streak from Grimaldi on the limb, during an eclipse. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=822 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 13:43-15:22 Ill=100% Unknown observed by Miranova on 1960-9-6

     On 1960 Sep 04 at UT00:00? Miranova (Russia or Israel) observed a TLP 
     at an unnamed lunar feature: "Spectral photom. of some lunar obj. in 
     4250, > 5000A bands. Spectral plates". Cameron suspects luminescence? 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=730 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 13:48-17:44 Ill=100% Kepler observed by Wildey on 1962-7-17 *

     Kepler 1962 Jul 17 UTC 06:24,08:36 Observed by Wildey, Pohn (Mt Wilson, 
     CA, USA, 60" reflector+photometer) "Crater was at Vmag 2.68 at earlier 
     obs. which was .47 mag brighter than av. mag. at 15d & it faded to near 
     normal at later time to V=3.10(photom. measures), a change of 1/2 mag. 
     or @1.5 times in brightness" NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA 
     catalog ID #761.


2020-Jan-10 UT 13:50-14:32 Ill=100% Atlas observed by Chernov on 1950-4-2

     In 1950 Apr 02 at UT 20:00 Chernov (Russia) observed two dark spots in 
     Atlas during a penumbral phase of a lunar eclipse to quickly darken and 
     become sharp in detail. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=524 and weight=1. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 14:48-16:40 Ill=100% Tycho observed by Chrevremont on 1898-1-8

     On 1898 Jan 08 at UT 00:00-01:00 Chrevremont (France?) notcied that 
     during a lunar eclipse, the mid-eclipse shadow was so dark that details 
     of the surface disappeared, all except for the Tycho SSW ray . Cameron 
     comments that it is unsual for that ray to remain when usually the ones 
     towards Kepler and Aristarchus are the ones to stand out? The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=297 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:09-15:56 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Cameron_W on 1968-4-13

     On 1968 Apr 13 at UT05:00-05:45 Cameron and Laczo (Greenbelt, MD, USA, 
     6" refractor, x50, 36" reflector x400, 12" reflector x80, seeing= 
     excellent) observed for the folliwing craters: Aristarchus, Pytheas, 
     Euler?, Censorinus, Plinius?, Proclus, Menelaus, Manilius: "Star-like 
     pts. in the craters. Only Aris. identified certainly, rest fairly 
     certain except Euler & Plinius. Seen in 6-in refr. at 50x but not in 
     36-in refl. at 400x where they were bright, but not star-lie pts. Seen 
     later in 12-in refl. at 80x. In another bldg. Seen 1st @ 1/2h before 
     totality ended, but not earlier dur. tot. tho't by author (WSC) to be 
     geom. & instrumental = power effect". Chilton, K.E. reports in RASCJ 
     that another observer did not report any of what the Greenbelt observers
     saw at all?The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1065 and weight=4. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:09-16:04 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Moore on 1975-11-18

     On 1975 Nov 18 at UT 19:38-23:34 Moore (Johannesburg, South Africa, 2" 
     refractor, S=II), Peters (Kent, UK, 8.5" reflector, x120, S=IV), Good 
     (Guilford, UK, binoculars), Foley (Dartford, Kent, UK, 12" reflector 
     and photographs), and McKay (Kingston, England, UK, 6" reflector, x48) 
     observed the following in Aristarchus during a lunar eclipse: "It 
     appeared much fainter than ever before seen in ecl. by Moore. Fainter 
     than Proc., Cop., & Tycho. Others rated brightness in order-- Hell, 
     Stevinus, Furnerius, proc.; & Proc., Tycho, Hell, Aris. Photos 
     confirmed dimness of it. For some observers it became invis. at S=II 
     (good). Good ranked at least 4 other craters brighter than Aris. & that 
     at 2035h it dimmed. Earthshine cond. extraordinarily good. Peters, at 
     S=IV (fair?) rated Aris. brightest". At 23:50UT LeCroy Jr and Sr 
     (Springfield, VA, 4.5" reflector, S=7) observed four glowing spots on 
     the Moon during a lunar eclipse (including Aristarchus). At 23:50UT 
     Aristarchus was an oval shape with no details seen. It had a ray 
     extending from the south west rim (normal). The north rim was slightly 
     blue and the south west rim very very slightly red. At 23:55UT it was 
     clearing and details showed. At 00:02UT it was clear. Sketches were 
     provided. Cameron comments that the colours fit Fitton's predictions on 
     spectral dispersion in our atmosphere from atmospheric inversions. The 
     brightness measued was 10+ and normal should be 9, and the plain is 
     4.5. The Moon's altitude at the LeCroy site was 45 deg. The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=1418-1420 and weight=5 (1-0 for LeCroy report). The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:12-16:00 Ill=100% N_Pole observed by Unknown_Observer on 1892-5-11

     On 1892 May 11 at 22:53UT an Unknown observer, during a partial eclipse 
     noticed an extension of the Earth;s shadow beyond the north cusp. 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=278 and weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:12-16:00 Ill=100% S_Pole observed by Unknown_Observer on 1892-5-11

     On 1892 May 11 at 22:53UT an Unknown observer, during a partial eclipse 
     noticed an extension of the Earth's shadow beyond the south cusp. 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=278 and weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:20-16:39 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Kolovos_G on 1989-8-17

     On 1989 Aug 17 at UT 01:02-04:20 G. Kolvos (Thesaloniki, Greece, 
     4"reflector) measured (using photometry) that although there was a 
     gradual fade over the Moon as the eclipse progressed, there was a 2"% 
     rise in brightness of Aristarchus.Graphs were submitted and photos. 
     A.C. Cook supplied CCD images and CCD photometry. A photograph by 
     Conway (Sun Prarie, WI, USA) at the start of the eclipse reveal a 
     bright colourless spot (aparently confirmed). The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=373 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:51-16:40 Ill=100% Mare_Serenitatis observed by Unknown_British_Observers on 1979-3-13

     On 1979 Mar 13 (UT not given) an unknown observer (UK?) during a 
     partial lunar eclipse observed an anomolous brightening in the umbra in 
     the form of a large diamond shape between mare Serenitatis and the 
     Moon's limb, just shortly after mid eclipse (UT 21:08).


2020-Jan-10 UT 16:21-16:40 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Johnson_SJ on 1902-10-17

     In 1902 Oct 17 at UT 04:35-06:00 Seen by S.J. Johson and also in 
     another report(s) by Brink, Swift, Wilson () observed a 
     "Dark band, no color, across center of moon dur. ecl. Copernicus 
     brighter than Tycho. Aristarchus brightest of all. Drawing by Brink & 
     Wilson at 1725(=0525UT)(Confirm. -- time given=16th at 1635-1800 = 17th 
     at 0435-0600 on present UT system". The Cameron 1978 vatalog ID=314 and 
     weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 16:33-16:40 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by deWitt on 1935-7-16

     In 1935 Jul 16 at UT 05:01 deWitt (Nashville, Tennessee, USA, 12" 
     reflector) "Photos in lunar ecl. indicate a probable fading of Grim. 
     floor a possible fading of S. tip of Ricc. spot, a possible enlargement 
     of halo around Linne, a possible, but unlikely darkening of Schick's 
     dark areas & no effect on Eratosthenes or white spot E. of Webb. Linne 
     enlargement more pronounced at 1902 ecl. than at any other time. Fading 
     of Ric. spot was pronounced on May 14, 1938". The Cameron 1978 catalog 
     ID=413 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-11 UT 10:33-14:10 Ill=99% Copernicus observed by Rawlings_G on 1978-4-23 *

     On 1978 Apr 23 at UT20:35 (Rawlings, UK, finderscope, x50) 
     observed a bright flash (~0.3 sec duration) near to Copernicus (20W, 
     9N) with rays to the south east whilst he looked through a finder 
     scope. Moore, who studied the drawing, suggests that the area of the 
     flash was near Copernicus. However Cameron says this cannot be the case 
     if the flash was in darkness as mentioned in the BAA Lunar Section 
     circular. She comments that it might have been a meteor? The Cameron 
     2005 catalog ID=28 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-11 UT 11:53-13:18 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1956-11-19

     On 1956 Nov 19 at UT 00:00? an unknown observer (Cameron gives an AGU 
     meeting reference) apparently saw a TLP in Aristarchus crater. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=657 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-11 UT 11:53-12:26 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Moore_P on 1985-5-5

     On 1985 May 05 at UT23:25-23:58 UT P. Moore (Selsey, UK) observed a 
     yellow tinge on the southern wall of Aristarchus - this was odd because 
     no colour was seen elsewhere on the Moon. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=
     271 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-11 UT 12:34-14:30 Ill=99% Littrow observed by Unknown_English_Observer on 1915-1-31

     Littrow 1915 Jan 31 UTC 22:00? Observer: unknown (England?) "6 to 7 
     spots arranged like a gamma first seen on this nite. (Kuiper atlas. 
     Rect. 14-c shows spots in form of a 7 or a cap. gamma backwards, but 
     not l.c. gamma)". NASA catalog weight=0 (almost certainly not a TLP). 
     NASA catalog ID #349. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-11 UT 12:34-14:29 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Thomas on 1970-2-22

     Aristarchus 1970 Feb 22 UTC 07:00? Observed by Thomas, Stump, Corral. 
     Obs. (Organ Pass, NM, 24" reflector+Moonblink) "Bluing around crater -- 
     vis. in monitor, but not photographable due to clouds." NASA catalog 
     weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #1235.


2020-Jan-11 UT 15:54-17:26 Ill=99% Proclus observed by Green_SM on 1938-11-8

     Proclus 1938 Nov 08 UTC 20:00 Observed by Green (England? Seeing = 
     good) "2 bright spots in Schmidt & Wilkins' craterlets. Was struck by 
     whitish aspect of parts of floor -- possibly mists. S.wall concealed by 
     these strong white patches, as if breached ring." NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #443.


2020-Jan-11 UT 16:14-17:49 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-18

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 18 UTC 09:54 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness of the area of over a mag. during the nite. 
     Recorded at Vmag=3.56 first, & a few min(?) later at 4.62. It was .95 
     mag. brighter (@2.5x) than av. for that age & then returned to 
     normal." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID #762.


2020-Jan-11 UT 17:03-17:49 Ill=99% Proclus observed by Darling_D on 1989-2-22

     On 1989 Feb 22 at UT03:48-03:58 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 3" 
     refractor, x56, seeing=4/10 and transparency=4) found that the floor of 
     Proclus was a "uniform grey" shade and the east wall was bright. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=357 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-12 UT 12:37-12:44 Ill=96% Herodotus observed by Brown_M on 1972-7-27

     Herodotus 1972 Jul 27 UT 2250-2350 M.Brown (Hutington, UK) 
     thought that he saw a pseudo peak in the centre of Herodotus.
     He could not decide if it was real or an optical illusion. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-12 UT 12:38-14:29 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Corralitos on 1970-2-23

     Aristarchus 1970 Feb 23 UTC 07:00? Observed by Thomas & Stump 
     (Corralitos Observatory, Organ PAss, NM, USA, 24" refletor+Moon Blink) 
     "Bluring around crater -- vis. in monitor, but not photographed due to 
     clouds." NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #1235.


2020-Jan-12 UT 12:41-14:34 Ill=96% Mons_Piton observed by Louderback_D on 1990-8-8

     On 1990 Aug 08 at OT 07:47-09:00 UT D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     3" refractor, x173) "(SS) Piton's all pts were << but nearby plain was 
     normal. Ridges at 5.3 at B, C, D but 3 alb at B, C, D (norm = 7) but 
     bearby plain was normal. At A 3, was hazy but ill defined. Parts of mt 
     brightened but others didn't. Times between brightening were 6-8s. 
     Similar to seeing fluctuations. In red mt stayed dull & steady. In blue 
     it blinked." - this is a direct quote from the Cameron 2006 catalog 
     because it is very difficult to summarize. Louderback comments that the 
     TLP was still going on at 09:00UT. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=406 and 
     the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-12 UT 12:41-14:34 Ill=96% Promontorium_Agarum observed by Darling_D on 1990-8-8

     On 1990 Aug 08 at UT 07:47-09:00 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 3" 
     refractor, x173) reported the following TLP in Promontorium Agarum 
     (Cape Agarum): "W flank of CA >>, even> Proc. interior." The cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=406 and the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-12 UT 13:25-14:16 Ill=96% Plato observed by Gledhill on 1870-2-17

     Plato 1870 Feb 18 UTC 00:00? Observed by Gledhill (Halifax, England, 
     9" refractor) "Illum. of another group of craters different from group 
     in Aug. & Sep. obs. (date is F18 if phase is similar to Ap 1870)
     NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #164.


2020-Jan-12 UT 13:57-15:54 Ill=96% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-19

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 19 UTC 07:30 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness from Vmag=3.46 to V=3.07, where av. mag. for that 
     age=3.26, or a brightening of .58 mag." NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog ID #763.


2020-Jan-12 UT 14:05-16:38 Ill=96% Plato observed by Haas_W on 1938-6-15 *

     Plato 1938 Jun 15 UTC 08:00 Observed by Haas? (New Mexico?, 12?" 
     reflector) "NW. end of floor had intensity I=2.0, but on 7/15/38, I=
     3.7, conditions similar." NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID 
     #439.


2020-Jan-12 UT 16:06-18:03 Ill=95% Unknown observed by Cragg on 1965-5-18

     On 1965 May 18 at UT 03:00-03:30 Cragg (Mt Wilson?, CA, USA, 6" 
     refractor?) observed a TLP (no feature nor description given in 
     the Cameron 1978 catalog) on the Moon. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=877 
     and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-12 UT 16:15-18:13 Ill=95% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-19

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 19 UTC 09:48 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness from Vmag=3.46 to V=3.07, where av. mag. for that 
     age=3.26, or a brightening of .58 mag." NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog ID #763.


2020-Jan-12 UT 17:33-19:01 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Pedler_J on 1990-1-13

     On 1990 Jan 13 at UT 22:15-23:05 J. Pedler (Bristol, UK, seeing=III and 
     transparency=excellent, no spurious colour) detected a blue region on 
     the north of Aristarchus, varying in sharpness/diffuseness. The crater 
     rim in this region could not be descerned. Eleswhere the crater rim was 
     normal as too were other features. When a Moon blink device was used, 
     no colour blink was detected, however through the blue filter the 
     suspected area was bright and the crater rim indistinct. Whereas 
     through the red filter the area looked perfectly normal. At 22:30UT the 
     effect had vanished and everywhere was normal. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=388 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-13 UT 13:15-14:27 Ill=90% Aristarchus observed by Corralitos on 1970-2-24

     Aristarchus 1970 Feb 24 UTC 07:00? Observed by Thomas & Stump 
     (Corralitos Observatory, Organ PAss, NM, USA, 24" refletor+Moon Blink) 
     "Bluring around crater -- vis. in monitor, but not photographed due to 
     clouds." NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #1235.


2020-Jan-13 UT 13:15-14:32 Ill=90% Alphonsus observed by Morgan_P on 1972-7-29

     Alphonsus 1972 Jul 29 UT 00:30-03:30 Observed by Morgan (England, UK) 
     "Orange spot just W. of c.p. on central ridge; circular area @ 15-25km 
     diam, larger than c.p. Was bright orange then turned orange-brown 
     toward center. Central 4,5km was darker than rest; bownish-black with 
     blue-white specks flashing in center. Obscur. there but ridge clear 
     elsewhere. The dark spot SW of c.p. could not be seentho outside of 
     color area. Sketch. It had appearance of dome of atm. thicker at 
     center. Never seen before in 11y. Next nite brighter. NASA catalog 
     weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1337. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-13 UT 16:02-17:53 Ill=89% Aristarchus observed by Brook_C on 2002-5-30

     On 2002 May 30 at UT02:30-02:44 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK) suspected that 
     Aristarchus crater looked dimmer than normal. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-14 UT 13:49-14:39 Ill=81% Alphonsus observed by Morgan_P on 1972-7-30

     Alphonsus 1972 Jul 30 UT 00:30-03:30 Observed by Morgan (UK 
     using a reflector) "Orange glow, brighter this nite than last 
     nite. Following nites were cloudy. Aristarchus and Gassendi 
     were negative." NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1338.
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-14 UT 16:01-17:57 Ill=81% Romer observed by Darling_D on 1979-8-12

     On 1979 Aug 12 at UT07:00-10:35 D. Darling and wife (Sun Prarie, WI, 
     USA, 12.5" reflector, x342, photos, S=9/10) observed a cigar shaped 
     protruberance in Romer crater that cast a 32km long shadow, nestled in 
     a valley rille next to Romer. This was a confirmed observation. The 
     effect persisted intil sunset. The top of the object and two points on 
     the crater rim were reflecting the Sun's rays. "Top of obj. & 2 pts on 
     crater rim reflected suns rays. It was as high as the crater rim 
     whereas the rill wall was not. Took photos. he has studied this area 
     and never saw such a phenom before. Photos did not show it". The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=65 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-15 UT 18:47-19:04 Ill=70% Aristarchus observed by Doherty_EG on 1964-1-5

     In 1964 Jan 05 at UT 22:00? Doherty (Stoke-on-Trent, UK, 3" refractor, 
     8" or 10" reflector) observed aristarchus to be purplish-blue in 
     colour. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=794 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2020-Jan-16 UT 17:16-19:03 Ill=59% Gassendi observed by Whippey_MR on 1966-12-4

     Gassendi 1966 Dec 04 UTC 01:05-01:23 Observed by Whippey (Northolt? 
     England, 6" reflector, x212) "Abrupt flash of red, setling in 
     immediately to a pt. of red haze nr. NW (ast.?) wall. Continuous till 
     0123 (date given was 4-12-66 = European convention?)." NASA catalog 
     weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1000.


2020-Jan-16 UT 17:41-18:58 Ill=59% Gassendi observed by Whippey_MR on 1966-4-12

     On 1966 Apr 12 at UT 01:05-01:23 Whippey (Northolt, England, UK, 6" 
     reflector x212) and Corralitos Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" 
     Moon Blink) observed in Gassendi: "Abrupt flash of red, settling 
     immediately to a point of red haze near NW (IAU?) wall. Continuous till 
     0123h. (Not confirmed at Corralitos Obs. MB--at same time?". The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=927 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2020-Jan-16 UT 18:47-19:04 Ill=59% Unknown observed by Markov on 1964-1-6

     On 1964 Jan 06 at 02:00? Markov and Khoshlova (Russia) observed 
     anomalous IR radiation on the Moon. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and 
     weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-17 UT 15:26-16:17 Ill=49% Alphonsus observed by Alter on 1956-10-26

     Alphonsus 1956 Oct 26 UT 12:54 Observed by Alter (Mt Wilson, CA, 
     USA, 60" reflector, S=E) "Photog. thru UV & IR filters. Obscur. 
     of E. 1/2 of floor evident in blue plates -- KodakII-O plate no 
     filter. 2m later Kodak I-N. One pair of plates best he'd ever 
     seen. Similar obscuration seen 2X on Linne (this started Kozyrev 
     on his spectrographic program.)." NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog ID #653.


2020-Jan-17 UT 15:26-15:45 Ill=49% Aristarchus observed by Moore_P on 1980-7-5

     On 1980 Jul 05 at 03:20UT P.Moore (Selsey, UK, 12?" reflector)
     found Aristarchus to be "Very brilliant indeed". Cameron 2006 
     TLP catalog ID=100 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-17 UT 15:26-18:35 Ill=47% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-18 UT 16:02-18:36 Ill=36% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-19 UT 16:41-18:37 Ill=26% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-20 UT 17:24-17:47 Ill=17% Aristarchus observed by Taboada on 1969-2-12

     On 1969 Feb 12 at UT 12:00 Taboada (Mexico, seeing=excellent) found 
     that the Aristarchus region had the same characteristics as the 
     previous days, perhaps a little darker colour brown, but more 
     remarkable. He used red, blue and green filters and a difference in 
     colour was noticed in and out of the region. Cameron suspects that 
     permanent colour was being seen? The cameron 1978 catalog ID=1116 and 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weigh=2.


2020-Jan-20 UT 17:24-18:38 Ill=17% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-21 UT 18:13-19:09 Ill=10% Earthshine observed by Haywood_J on 1884-9-16

     On 1884 Sep 16 at UT 09:30-10:00 Heywood (Westville, Ohio, 2" 
     refractor) saw an unusually bright glow covering dark part, nearly 
     uniform. Thought it was electric because it was too bright for 
     Earthshine. It obscured features. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and 
     weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1


2020-Jan-21 UT 18:12-18:39 Ill=10% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-21 UT 18:47-19:09 Ill=10% E_Limb observed by Hopkins_BJ on 1882-11-7

     On 1882 Nov 07 at UT 05:00 Hopkins (UK) observed the dark 
     eastern limb and a line of light and attributed this to a lunar 
     atmosphere. Further details can be found in: Reference: Sirius 
     16, 279, 1883. Cameron 1978  catalog ID=229 and weight=3.
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-28 UT 09:00-09:18 Ill=11% Aristarchus observed by Rule on 1959-9-5

     On 1959 Sep 5 UT 19:13-19:45 Rule (London, UK, 3" refractor, 
     x130, seeing = excellent) observed in Aristarchus a star like 
     point with intermittent flares ups in brightness, reaching about 
     8-9 in magnitude.The cameron 1978 catalog ID=718 and weight=1. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-28 UT 09:00-09:31 Ill=11% Aristarchus observed by Darling_D on 1984-12-26

     On 1984 Dec 26 at UT00:30-00:50 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5"reflector, x61, seeing=3 out of 10) found that Aristarchus, 
     Shroter's Valley (and other lunar features reported separately) were 
     very bright in blue light. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=257 and the 
     weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-28 UT 09:00-09:31 Ill=11% Copernicus observed by Darling_D on 1984-12-26

     On 1984 Dec 26 at UT00:30-00:50 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5"reflector, x61, seeing=3 out of 10) found that Copernicus (and 
     other lunar features reported separately) were very bright in blue 
     light. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=257 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-28 UT 09:00-09:31 Ill=11% Delambre observed by Darling_D on 1984-12-26

     On 1984 Dec 26 at UT00:30-00:50 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5"reflector, x61, seeing=3 out of 10) detected a bright flash in the 
     Delambre region. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=257 and the weight=0. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-28 UT 09:00-09:31 Ill=11% Manilius observed by Darling_D on 1984-12-26

     On 1984 Dec 26 at UT00:30-00:50 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5"reflector, x61, seeing=3 out of 10) found that Manilius (and 
     other lunar features reported separately) were very bright in blue 
     light. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=257 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-28 UT 09:00-09:31 Ill=11% Menelaus observed by Darling_D on 1984-12-26

     On 1984 Dec 26 at UT00:30-00:50 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5" reflector, x61, seeing=3 out of 10) found that Menelaus (and 
     other lunar features reported separately) were very bright in blue 
     light. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=257 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-28 UT 09:00-09:31 Ill=11% Promontorium_Agarum observed by Darling_D on 1984-12-26

     On 1984 Dec 26 at UT00:30-00:50 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5"reflector, x61, seeing=3 out of 10) found that Promontorium Agarum 
     (and other features reported separately) were very bright in blue 
     light. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=257 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-28 UT 09:00-09:31 Ill=11% Tycho observed by Darling_D on 1984-12-26

     On 1984 Dec 26 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 12.5" reflector, 
     seeing=3 out of 10) found that Tycho's ray (and many other craters) 
     appeared to glow brightly in blue in Earthshine. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=257 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-28 UT 09:00-09:31 Ill=11% S_Pole observed by Livesey_R on 1997-4-10

     South Pole 1997 Apr 10 UTC 20:45 Observed by Livesey (Scotland, 65x33, 
     Seeing Antioniadi II, Transparency : Thick Haze Alto Stratus, windy) 
     "Two bright spots seen - one on southern tip of crescent and 2nd way 
     over on the dark side of the S. limb. Earthshine seen, but no 
     features". Probably these are just peaks making it into sunlight -
     though one of them was of considerable distance from the tip of
     the cresecent (was this the peak of eternal light?). So therefore 
     the ALPO/BAA weight=1 i.e. it is worth checking out - however we 
     may not be able to tell for sure until the libration matches 
     up too.


2020-Jan-28 UT 09:31-09:33 Ill=11% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-29 UT 09:31-10:02 Ill=18% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-30 UT 08:58-09:01 Ill=25% Earthshine observed by Johnson_LT on 1950-11-14

     1950 Nov 14 UT23:38 L.T. Johnson (La Plata, MD, USA, 10" 
     reflector, x179) observed a mag 10 flash in Earthshine. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-30 UT 08:58-09:15 Ill=25% Grimaldi observed by Schmitt on 1972-12-10

     On 1972 Dec 10 at UT21:11 Schmitt, whilst orbiting the Moon on Apollo 
     17 saw a flash in Grimaldi. When questioned by Cameron upon return to 
     Earth, he said that he was dark adapted at the time and was unable to 
     say whether it was a cosmic ray or an impact flash. Cameron says that 
     there have been many similar reports in the past from Earth-based 
     observers e.g. TLP report No. 1167). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1352 
     and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-30 UT 08:58-10:15 Ill=25% Aristarchus observed by Moore_P on 1984-1-8

     On 1984 Jan 08 at UT16:30-18:40 P. Moore (Selsey, UK, seeing=III) could 
     not see Aristarchus in Earthsine, despite, Tycho and the mare regions 
     being plainly visible. Foley (Kent, UK) found Aristarchus to be a "soft 
     blue patch" and North (seeing IV-V) found the crater to be one of the 
     brightest features on the Moon. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=237 and the 
     weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2020-Jan-30 UT 09:23-10:26 Ill=25% Piccolomini observed by Cameron_W on 1990-8-26

     On 1990 Aug 26 at UT 02:30-03:30 W. Cameron (Sedona, AZ, USA, 8" 
     reflector, x110 and x220) observed that Proclus and Piccolomini craters 
     both had a pink colour inside them. At a higher magnification of x220 
     Piccolomini was still pink and it was stronger on the central peak's 
     wesern side. The cameron 2006 catalog ID=407 and the weight=3. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1 as the Moon was not above the horizon at the date and UT given. 


2020-Jan-30 UT 09:23-10:26 Ill=25% Proclus observed by Cameron_W on 1990-8-26

     On 1990 Aug 26 at UT 02:30-03:30 W. Cameron (Sedona, AZ, USA, 8" 
     reflector, x110, x220, seeing=good) observed that the north wall of 
     Proclus crater was the brightest part of the crater, indeed very 
     bright. Proclus and Picolomini had pink colours inside them. CED 
     brightness measurements were as follows: "Proc. at 100x 4.0, 4.0; at 
     200x 3.4, 3.4; Theop. 3.5, 3.9; 3.5; Herc. 2.5, 2.75; 3.5; Atlas 2.8, 
     2.5, 3.0; Posidonius 3.0." The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=407 and the 
     weight=3. The BAA/ALPO weight=1 as the Moon was not above
     the horizon at the UT given.


2020-Jan-30 UT 09:23-10:26 Ill=25% Theophilus observed by Cameron_W on 1990-8-26

     On 1990 Aug 26 at UT 02:30-03:30 W. Cameron (Sedona, AZ, USA, 8" 
     reflector, x110 and x220, seeing=good) observed that the west wall of 
     Theophilus crater was red (on terminator). However Posidonius was also 
     on the terminator and no colour was seen elsewhere along the 
     terminator, however Proclus and Piccolomini had pink interiors. At a 
     higher power of x220 a prismatic effect was seen on the terminator in 
     Theophilus and opther craters - "even on W rim of a crater due W of 
     Theoph.". CED measurements of Theophilus... 3.5, 3.9, 3.5. The Cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=407 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=1
     because the Moon was below the horizon at this time. 


2020-Jan-30 UT 09:53-10:26 Ill=26% Aristarchus observed by Joulia on 1931-2-22

     On 1931 Feb 22 at UT 20:30 Joulia (Castelnaudary, Aude, France?) 
     observed in the Aristarchus region: "Reddish-yellow glimmer of light, 
     very variable with nearly complete extinction. (similar to Herschel's 
     1787 & Tempel's 6/10/1866 obs.)". The Cameron 1978 atalog ID=399 and 
     weight=3.


2020-Jan-30 UT 09:30-10:28 Ill=26% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-31 UT 08:58-10:31 Ill=34% Mare_Orientale observed by Cernan on 1972-12-11

     On 1972 Dec 11 at UT22:28 Cernan, on board Apollo 17, saw a flash on 
     the east rille in Mare Orientale (88W, 20S) as he orbited the Moon. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog weight=1354 and the weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-31 UT 09:36-10:33 Ill=34% Censorinus observed by Serio_R on 2004-12-18

     2004 Dec 18 UT 02:00 F. Serio (Houston, TX, USA) may have 
     imaged aperiod of brightening in this crater in images - 
     though Darling comments that it could be a Registax issue. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-31 UT 10:42-10:52 Ill=34% Ross_D observed by Harris on 1967-12-8

     Ross D 1967 Dec 8 UT 02:30-02:40 Observer: Harris (Tucson?, 
     AZ?), colourless bright area SW of Ross D with repeated 
     condensations that appeared then dissipated in thirty seconds to 
     a minute. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-31 UT 10:45-10:52 Ill=35% Ross_D observed by Mt_Wilson on 2018-6-19

     2018 Jun 19 UT 04:00 G. Cross, using a 60" f/16 Cass, Strehl > 
     0.9, under descent seeing conditions, found that the ghost 
     crater was not visible - was this an obscuration or just 
     normal apeparance? ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-31 UT 09:29-10:54 Ill=35% Earthshine: sporadic meteors