TLP Repeat Illumination/Libration and Earthshine predictions for: Australia WA Perth



Ill is percentage illumination of the Moon
*Indicates a repeat illumination and libration event to within +/- 1 deg for both
A non-* indicates just repeat illumination to within +/-0.5 deg


2020-Jan-01 UT 11:22-11:59 Ill=34% Aristarchus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 11:22-11:59 Ill=34% Campanus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johnson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 11:22-11:59 Ill=34% Hecataeus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 11:22-11:59 Ill=34% Hevelius observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 12:32-13:56 Ill=34% Proclus observed by Darling_D on 1989-2-11

     On 1989 Feb 11 at UT23:30-01:39 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x159, seeing=7/10) observed a linear east to west feature in 
     Proclus. D. Weier (WI, USA, 11" reflector, x378) found the NNW part of 
     the crater to be brighter than expected and confirmed the prescence of 
     the east to west feature - this crossed the shadow on the east floor 
     and over into Mare Crisium. R. Manske (WI, USA) detected another 
     "streak" parallel to this. All observers suspect that the linear 
     features were due to raised topography on the floor of Proclus - 
     however Cameron comments that there does not seem to be any linear 
     features on the floor of Proclus to cause these effects. The Cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=351 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-01 UT 12:37-13:56 Ill=34% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1979-3-4

     On 1979 Mar 04 at UT18:15-21:45 P.W. Foley, (Kent, UK, 12" reflector, 
     x180, seeing II-I) noticed that Aristarchus was unusually bright 
     (though colourless) - the northern part being the more brilliant. Other 
     features seen but less visible, though still quite obvious. A CED 
     brightness reading of 0.3 was recorded - the highest ever so far. Amery 
     (Reading, UK, 19?" reflector, 50-100x, obtained photographs. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=46 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-01 UT 12:37-13:56 Ill=34% Grimaldi observed by Foley_PW on 1979-3-4

     On 1979 Mar 04 at UT18:15-21:45 P.W. Foley, (Kent, UK, 12" reflector, 
     x180, seeing II-I) noticed that although other features in Earthshine 
     were quite obvious, Grimaldi was not, though at x200 (should this be 
     20:00?) Grimaldi "shone with a brilliance to that of a thin cresecent 
     of 2-3d". Amery (Reading, UK, 19?" reflector, 50-100x, obtained 
     photographs. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=46 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA
     weight=3.


2020-Jan-01 UT 12:47-13:56 Ill=34% Macrobius observed by Barcroft on 1939-10-19

     Macrobius 1939 Oct 19 UT 02:00? Observed by Barcroft (Madera, CA, USA, 
     6" reflector) "Reddish-brown hue (unusual) usually absent" NASA 
     catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #463.


2020-Jan-01 UT 12:50-13:56 Ill=34% Aristarchus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 12:50-13:56 Ill=34% Campanus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 12:50-13:56 Ill=34% Hecataeus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 12:50-13:56 Ill=34% Hevelius observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2020-Jan-01 UT 13:14-13:56 Ill=34% Aristarchus observed by Classen on 1967-4-15

     On 1967 Apr 15 at UT 19:15-21:00 Classen (Pulsnitz Observatory, East 
     Germany, 8" refractor) found that Aristarchus was very bright and the 
     atmospheric seeing was very good until 21:00UT. Nothing unsual was seen 
     on 16th and 17th April. Cameron reports that this was the first TLP 
     seen by this group. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1022 and the weight=3. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-01 UT 11:54-13:58 Ill=35% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-02 UT 11:36-12:22 Ill=43% Unknown observed by Gaboreau on 1895-9-25

     On 1895 Sep 25 at UT 20:00? Gaboreau (Paris, France) observed on the 
     Moon s shaft of light (same observation as Cameron's TLP report #281 
     and further more it is on the same day and month as it was back in 
     1893. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=286 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-02 UT 11:55-14:27 Ill=44% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-03 UT 11:22-14:46 Ill=53% Ptolemaeus observed by Cook_AC on 1978-4-15 *

     Ptolemaeus 1978 Apr 15 UTC 21:54-22:20 Observed by A.Cook 
     (Frimley, Surrey, UK, 12" reflector x240, S=IV (Antoniadi)) 
     "Small triangular area on the NW floor of the crater, at the 
     foot of the rim, was slightly brighter in blue light than in red 
     (Moonblink used). Suspected this was due to the poor observing 
     conditions. Certainly blink reaction was not unmistakable". 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-03 UT 12:58-14:11 Ill=53% Alphonsus observed by Sartory on 1966-5-27

     Alphonsus 1966 May 27 UT 21:10 Observed by Sartory, Moore, 
     Mosely (England and Ireland, 8.5" reflector, 10" refractor) "Red 
     colour on central peak area" NASA catalog ID 937. NASA catalog 
     weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-03 UT 14:23-16:06 Ill=54% Archimedes observed by Burnerd on 1922-5-4 *

     In 1922 May 04 at UT Burnerd (England?) discovered three long mounds in 
     Archimedes crater (rays?). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=385 and weight=
     0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-03 UT 11:55-14:42 Ill=54% Earthshine: Quadrantids: ZHR=120 (vel=41km/s

2020-Jan-03 UT 14:51-14:52 Ill=54% Maginus observed by Lord_CJR on 1975-5-18

     On 1975 May 18 at UT2115-2145 C. Lord (St Annes-on-sea, 
     Lancashire, UK, 76mm f/16 refractor, x170, Wratten 25, and 44a 
     Moon blink filters used, Transparency 4.5/5, no wind, S=F). The 
     west flank of Maginus, and the interior, appeared to be partly 
     obscured. No other features in a similar position along the 
     terminator were obscured. No colour blink was detected with the 
     filters, though a pronounced red/white light blink was noted; the 
     device employed a N.D. x4 filter. By 21:45UT the floor was no 
     longer obscured and only Magninus G was masked in a white haze; 
     however immediately adjacent to the terminator was an ill defined 
     misty patch lying where the outer flank of maginus would have 
     been visible. The rest of the terminator was sharp. The 
     obscuration was only seen to advantage in blue and int. light, 
     and the blue/int blink was only very slight. Findlay and 
     McDonnell observed 21:30-23:00 using a 25cm refractor (Seeing II-
     III) but failed to see anything unsual. NASA catalog weight=3. 
     NASA catalog ID #1407. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-04 UT 11:22-11:54 Ill=62% Tycho observed by Spellman_R on 1996-4-27 *

     1996 Apr 27 UTC 02:26-03:14 Observed by Spellman (Los Angeles, CA, USA)
     " 02:26 U.T. Sunrise on Tycho 3/4 of the crater was in shadow, 
     topmost section of the central peak was in sunlight. In white light 
     brightness of the central peak rivaled the brightness of the Eastern
     (sunlit) wall. No change was detected in red light, however in blue 
     light definite strong darkening was observed. Blink obtained when 
     viewing thru 25A and 38 filters. At 2:52 U.T. in the poor to fair 
     seeing the apparent size of the central peak in white and red light was 
     the same, in blue light the central peak in white and red light was the 
     same, in blue light the central peak size shrank to 1/2 white and red 
     size (and brightness). Also appearing sharper. Comparison was made also 
     with the central peak of Alphonsus, no changes were observed. The 
     significant part of the observation was the relative brightness of the 
     central peak to the sunlit rim in white and red light, they appeared 
     almost identical with the crater rim, being just slightly brighter. In 
     blue light the brightness of the central peak was reduced by at least 
     half while the rim brightness was not, (relative to one another). I 
     strongly believe that this was a real event. The shadow filled 
     portion of Tycho was examined for any abnormalities but none 
     were observed. Observations were ended shortly after 3:14 U.T. due to 
     clouds. I also conducted about 20 Moon blink observations during this 
     observing run and got the same strong reaction each time." ALPO/BAA
     weight=3.


2020-Jan-04 UT 12:44-14:37 Ill=63% Proclus observed by Farrant_M on 1967-4-18

     Proclus 1967 Apr 18 UTC 18:40-18:45 Observed by Farrant (Cambridge, 
     England, 8" reflector x175) "Crater appeared quite dark, even bright 
     ring was subdued & seemed thicker than normal. Drawing." NASA catalog 
     weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1028. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-04 UT 14:46-15:19 Ill=63% Alphonsus observed by Smith_S on 1966-5-28

     Alphonsus 1966 May 28 UT 23:00-01:00 Observed by Smith (England, 10" 
     reflector) Birney (VA?, USA, 8" refactor + Moonblink) Corralitos Obs. 
     (NM, USA, 24" reflector + Moonblink) "Red patches (Smith), Trident Moon 
     Blink device suspected(?? log)earlier at 22:40. Birney observed at 
     2300-0100?, and gave indep. confirm? Corralitos did not confirm MB 
     (however they report Gassendi-- misident. ?)" NASA catalog weight=5. NASA catalog ID #938. ALPO/BAA      weight=4.


2020-Jan-04 UT 11:55-14:48 Ill=63% Earthshine: Quadrantids: ZHR=120 (vel=41km/s

2020-Jan-05 UT 11:23-12:53 Ill=72% Linne observed by Dawes on 1867-3-15

     Linne 1867 Mar 15 UT 20:00? Observed by Dawes (England?) "Excessively 
     minute black dot in middle of feature. A geom. fig. boarded & centered 
     with black that formed, dissolved & formed again" NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #150.


2020-Jan-05 UT 13:55-14:53 Ill=72% Proclus observed by Cook_MC on 1982-2-3

     M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK) got an abnormally low brightness reading for
     Proclus, despite nearby Censorinus being normal. Crater Extinction
     Device used. The Cameron 2006 Extension catalog ID was 163 and the 
     weight was 3. The ALPO/BAA weight was 2 too.


2020-Jan-05 UT 14:13-14:39 Ill=72% Kies observed by Jean on 1984-6-9

     On 1984 Jun 09 at UT 04:55-05:14 P. Jean (Outremont, Canada) detected 
     in the dark side of the Moon, a few km east of Kies crater, a bright 
     point that should not be poking out of the shadow (according to Foley). 
     The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=244 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2020-Jan-05 UT 14:35-15:47 Ill=72% Lambert_Gamma observed by Khachatryan_S on 2008-8-11

     127mm f/12 GoTo scope, x62-x154, seeing: best and transparency=
     6) observed that an unoficially named mountain (Lambert Gamma or 
     Mons Undest), near Lambert, had a "very strong glow", especially 
     the part that was facing the line of the terminator and this was 
     brighter than the side facing away. The No other object nearby 
     was casting as much light, even Mons La Hire. The effect was 
     seen for 40 minutes and the glow was present throughout. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-05 UT 15:39-15:47 Ill=73% Proclus observed by Darling_D on 1989-2-16

     On 1989 Feb 16 at UT02:46-03:01 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 3" 
     refractor, x140, seeing=6/10) found that the brightness of the rim of 
     Proclus was 9.0 (normal?). The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=354 and the 
     weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-06 UT 13:49-15:46 Ill=81% Proclus observed by Darling_D on 1989-2-17

     On 1989 Feb 17 at UT00:55 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5" reflector, x248) found that the brightness of the rim of 
     Proclus was 9.0, the north west wall to be 9.5, the west wall 
     to be 5.2, and the east wall 8.2 (normal?). The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=355 and the weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-06 UT 14:24-16:17 Ill=81% Ross_D observed by Harris on 1964-6-21

     On 1964 Jun 21 at UT 03:43-05:44 Harris, Cross and Helland (Whittier, 
     CA, USA, 19" reflector) observed south of Ross D: "Moving dark area". 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=819 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-06 UT 14:44-15:47 Ill=81% SW_Limb observed by Logue_DA on 1955-1-5

     On 1955 Jan 05 at 01:00-01:30 UT D.A. Logue (Larchment, PA, 
     USA, 15cm reflector at x340, seeing Good) saw a strange blue 
     light above the surface of the Moon where the night and the 
     day meet. He observed this light for more than 30 min and it 
     did not appear to move. It appeared like a star in that the 
     rays of light came from it. The observer adds that he first 
     thought thst the objects was a star, but later decided that it 
     had to be on the Moon itself. A drawing shows the blue spot 
     near the rugged south west (IAU?) limb of the Moon. The editor 
     of the Strolling Astronomer (Vol 8, No. 11-12, Nov-Dec 1954, 
     p146) was unable to identify the craters drawn. The editor 
     speculates that the observer saw a high mountain peak with its 
     summit in sunlight and detached from the illuminated regions - 
     however this would not explain the blue colour. Note this is 
     an ALPO observation and does not apear in the Cameron 
     catalogs. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-07 UT 11:23-12:26 Ill=88% Bailly observed by Miles_H on 1965-5-12

     On 1965 May 12 at UT 22:20 H. Miles (UK) found a possible 
     obscuration in Bailly crater. Most of the region was as sharp as 
     normal, but the central area was greyish and blurred. Although 
     the observer concerned considered themselves a non-experienced 
     observer, another BAA Lunar Section observer saw the same 
     effect. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-07 UT 11:23-12:07 Ill=88% Herodotus observed by Haas_W on 2003-5-13

     On 2003 May 13 at UT06:40-07:26 W. Haas (Las Cruces, NM, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x321 and x202, S=2, T=3.5) suspected (06:40-06:55UT) that he 
     saw an oval bright feature (intensity 5.5) near the centre of the floor 
     of Herodotus crater indenting into the shadow - however the seeing was 
     none too good, so it is more of a suspicion than a definite sighting. 
     At 07:14-07:26UT he re-examined the region (x202 and x321, S=1-2 and T=
     3.5) and had better glimpses that conformed his initial suspicions of 
     there being an oval indentation bright spot (now intensity 6) into the 
     shadow in the centre of the floor. Of course Herodotus does not have a 
     central peak! There was also a very bright spot on the NW> sunlit rim 
     of Herodotus crater. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-07 UT 12:11-13:49 Ill=88% Herodotus observed by Wilkins_HP on 1950-3-30

     Herodotus 1950 Mar 30 UT 19:00? Observed by Wilkins (Kent, 
     UK, 15" reflector) "Transient c.p. (similar phen. to 
     Bartlett's in later yrs.? see #532). NASA catalog weight=4 
     (good). NASA catalog ID #523. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-07 UT 12:31-14:28 Ill=88% Herodotus observed by Bartlett on 1956-11-15

     Herodotus 1956 Nov 15 UT 01:05-01:30 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 3.5" reflector x100) "Pseudo c.p. clearly 
     seen est. I=5.5, wratten filters showed it neutral to green, 
     red, & yellow, but duller in blue. Floor est. 2deg, distinctly 
     olive-green. Precise time at 0117 at col. 55.27deg" NASA catalog 
     weight=4. NASA catalog ID #655. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-07 UT 13:17-15:14 Ill=88% Aristarchus observed by Darnella on 1967-4-21

     Aristarchus area 1967 Apr 21 UT 19:00-21:20 Observed by 
     Darnella (Copenhagen, Denmark, 3.5" refractor, S=1-2), 
     Farrant (Cambridge, England, 8" reflector, x160), Corralitos 
     Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector with 
     Moonblink) "On exterior wall of Aris., 3 pts. in Cobra Head & 
     banks of valley were star-like & glowing; & Herod. were red. 
     Farrant could not bring hill N. of Herod. into focus. He says
     color was deep red-orange & steady for 3 min. Started at 
     1915h (1916-1925h seeing was too bad) (indep. confirm.). 
     Suspected next nite but bad seeing. Not confirmed by 
     Corralitos MB." NASA catalog weight=5. NASA catalog ID #1030. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-07 UT 13:54-15:41 Ill=88% Herodotus observed by Hill_H on 1966-11-24

     Herodotus 1966 Nov 24 UT 21:50 H.Hill (UK, 7.25" reflector, 
     x240), seeing 4-6/10, transparancy 4/5) sketched a central white 
     diffuse patch inside the floor of the crater, with a size of 
     about 1/7th the diameter of the crater. The eastern edge of the 
     white patch was encroached by the shadow of the eastern rim. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-07 UT 14:20-15:41 Ill=88% Proclus observed by Farrant_M on 1972-12-17

     Proclus 1972 Dec 17 UTC 18:30 Observed by Farrant (Cambridge, England, 
     8.5" reflector) "Crater appeared very bright (Apollo 17 Watch)." NASA 
     catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #1359.


2020-Jan-07 UT 15:24-16:51 Ill=88% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Beaumont_S on 1993-6-2

     On 1993 Jun 02 at Ut 04:30-05:45 S. Beaumont (Cambridge, UK) saw that 
     the shadow of the Cobra's Head in Schroter's Valley was lighter and 
     more diffuse seen at user defined locations of C or B rim (these were 
     black versus medium gray for Cobra's Head). The TLP had vanished by 
     05:45UT. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=462 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1 because the date or time is wrong.


2020-Jan-07 UT 16:47-16:51 Ill=89% Aristarchus observed by Lena_R on 2004-5-1

     On 2004 May 01 at UT 22:20 R. Lena (GLR, Italy) received an image from 
     one of his observers showing possible blue colour in Aristarchus crater 
     and part of the ray towards Herodotus. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-08 UT 11:23-12:48 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Amery_GW on 1978-4-20 *

     Amery (Reading, England) saw blue in Aristarchus but a photograph did 
     not show the colour. Foley thinks this was spurious colour. Cameron 
     2006 extension catalog ID=27. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-08 UT 11:23-12:48 Ill=94% Promontorium_Laplace observed by Foley_PW on 1978-4-20 *

     Peter Foley observed a tiny yellow-brown region close
     to the tip of the cape, north east of the precipitous west
     edge, in the face of the north facing slope. The area
     concerned was diffuse and varied in density despite
     the surroundings not varying. Foley notcied no colour
     elsewhere on the Moon, though Amery thought that he saw
     some in Aristarchus, but Foley thinks this was spurious.
     Cameron 2006 catalog extension ID=27 and weight=5.
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-08 UT 13:25-15:17 Ill=94% Unknown observed by Miranova on 1960-9-4

     On 1960 Sep 04 at UT00:00? Miranova (Russia or Israel) observed a TLP 
     at an unnamed lunar feature: "Spectral photom. of some lunar obj. in 
     4250, > 5000A bands. Spectral plates". Cameron suspects luminescence? 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=730 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-08 UT 13:46-14:54 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Cross on 1967-11-15

     Aristarchus-Cobra Head, 1967 Nov 15 UT 05:40-06:00 Observed by Cross, 
     Tombaugh (Las Cruces, NM, 12" reflector x800) and Harris (Tucson, AZ), 
     and Dunlap (Organ Pass, NM, 24" reflector with Moonblink). "Obs. 
     reddish color N. & E. of Aris. & more intense color nr. E.(IAU?) rim of 
     Cobra Head. Red color nr.C.H. confirmed by Tombaugh. Obtained 10 photos 
     between 0543-0549h in 3 spectral bands (blue, yellow, red, & integ. 
     light). No change dur. obs. per. but spot got smaller at moments of 
     good seeing. Isodensitometry of photos. At Corralitos 0152-0155 on 24-
     in image intensifier & filter sys. photoos at 0320-0330h. Harris at 
     Tucson got spectra. Neither of latter 2 show anything unusual. Its 
     edges were nebulous even at best seeing. Size @ that of Cobra's Head." 
     NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA catalog ID #1053.


2020-Jan-08 UT 14:29-16:12 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1975-5-23

     Aristarchus 1975 May 23 P.W. Foley (Wilmington, UK, 12" 
     reflector, x200, x360, x624, atmospheric clarity good, seeing 
     III from 20:15-22:30, but the clouded out at 22:30, and from 
     23:15-01:15 seeing was IV-V with poor transparency) observed 
     (22:20-20:45 UT) variation in the SE corner of the 
     Aristarchus, namely the usual dark bands were alternating 
     light to dark, not in keeping with otyher crater features. 
     This effect was not linked to atmospheric turbulence. Also 
     projected image of bands beyond the crater W. wall were 
     repeatedly noted. The observer broke away from observing at 
     20:45UT to make a telephonealert call. At 20:55UT they noted 
     that the area between Vallis Schroteri and Herodotus seemed 
     very light/bright, also the E. exterior of the crater wall of 
     Herodotus. From 21:01-21:11 A slight blueness was seen to 
     extend from the NE corner of Aristarchus, along the exterior 
     rim, acrossand beyond Herodotus to the SW. A tgorough search 
     was made of many bright areas, both near the terminator and to 
     the E., but no blueness could be detected elsewhere. A slight 
     orange hue was noted along the E. limb of theMoon (Spurious 
     colour). From 21:18;22:30 Aristarchus seemed normal again, and 
     likewise the head of Vallis Schoteri too. The observer was 
     clouded out from 22:30-23:15and from 23:15-01:30 the seeing 
     was so appaling that no colour or projection of the bands 
     could be seen. A Moon Blink was used during the session, but 
     no colour was detected in this? Another observer, R.W. Rose 
     (Devon, UK) observed 21:20-21:30 but had IV seeing, and saw 
     nothing unusual, but commented that if TLP wactivity had been 
     taking place, then they would probably not have seen it. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-08 UT 14:43-16:38 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Schobel on 1967-4-22

     Aristarchus-herodotus 1967 Apr 22 UT 20:20 Observed by Schobel 
     (Hirschfelde, Germany, 5"? refractor) "Interference filter. 
     (indep. confirm. of Darnella?)" NASA catalog weight=5. NASA 
     catalog ID #1032. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-08 UT 15:23-17:18 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Classen on 1967-4-22

     Aristarchus 1967 Apr 22 UT 21:00? Observed by Classen 
     (Pulsnitz Obs., E. Germany) & by Corralitos Observatory (Organ 
     Pass, New Mexicoo, 24" reflector+Moonblink). "Crater was so 
     bright it could be seen with the naked eye (indep. confirm. of 
     Darnella & Schobel of activity here?). Corralitos M.B. did not 
     confirm." NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1034. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-08 UT 15:28-16:24 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1979-8-6

     Aristarchus normal in red and blue filters however the
     Cobra Head part of Schroter's Valley was brighter in blue.
     Indeed it was very dull in red - Louderback says that this
     was not surprising as the whole areas around Aristarchus is
     brighter in blue. Louderback is an experienced observer
     of the Aristarchus area of more than 10 years. Cameron 2006
     extended catalogID=63 and weight=1. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-08 UT 15:48-17:31 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1964-6-23

     On 1964 Jun 23 at UT 04:45-05:05 Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA, 5" 
     reflector, x180, S=4-1 and T=3) observed a blue-violet glare on the 
     north east rim and a strong violet tinge in the nimbus. The effect was 
     absent 1 hour earlier. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=821 and weight=4. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-08 UT 16:09-17:31 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Darnella on 1967-4-22

     Aristarchus, Schroter's Valley, Herodotus 1967 Apr 22 UT 
     21:45 Observed by Darnella (Copenhagen, Danemark, 3.5" 
     refractor) & Coralitos Observatory (Organ Pass, New Mexico, 
     USA (24" reflector + Moonblink). "Red pts. suspected in same 
     areas as in #1030, but seeing was bad. (confirm by Schobel?). 
     Corralitos MB did not confirm" NASA catalog weight=5. NASA 
     catalog ID #1033. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-09 UT 13:33-15:20 Ill=98% Unknown observed by Miranova on 1960-9-5

     On 1960 Sep 04 at UT00:00? Miranova (Russia or Israel) observed a TLP 
     at an unnamed lunar feature: "Spectral photom. of some lunar obj. in 
     4250, > 5000A bands. Spectral plates". Cameron suspects luminescence? 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=730 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-09 UT 13:42-14:05 Ill=98% Plato observed by Chapman on 1982-6-5

     On 1982 Jun 05 at 22:00? UT, Chapman (UK, using a 12" reflector), again 
     using a x2 yellow filter, noticed that the central craterlet 
     detectabilty changed such that sometimes it was visible and sometimes 
     not. Foley (Kent, UK)noticed that the central craterlet could only just 
     be seen between June 2 to June 5 and was much less discernable than 
     during the previous lunation. No CED brightness measurements made. The 
     floor of Plato was noted to be very dark though. Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=172 and weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-09 UT 14:13-15:47 Ill=98% Riccioli observed by Brittman_O on 1964-6-24

     During an eclipse of the Moon the crater appeared normal until it
     emerged from the shadow. In the north east the dark floor was
     not its normal hue and two light areas appeared to join. The
     emerging patches became less and less bright, finally disappearing
     at 0345 UT when the crater returned to normal. Cameron 2006 catalog 
     extension ID=10 and weight=2. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-09 UT 14:34-16:14 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Weresuik on 1965-5-15

     Aristarchus 1965 May 15 UTC 01:40-02:15 Observed by Weresuik, McClench, 
     Johnson (Pt. Tobacco, MD, USA, 16" reflector x240, S=F, T=G) and Delano 
     (Massachusetts, USA, 12" reflector). "Crater had color(red?) detected 
     by Trident MB & photos were obtained. There were pulsations. Delano saw 
     E. wall of crater unusually bright (confirm. if at same time)." NASA 
     catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA catalog ID #876.


2020-Jan-09 UT 14:48-15:57 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Doherty_BT on 1963-12-29

     1963Dec29/30 UT 22:00-03:00. Doherty (Small Thorne, UK) 8.5" 
     reflector, x110, x200 & x274, S=8-8.5, T=8, Moon 57 deg in alt) 
     and 3 others, using the same instrument, saw a bright purple-
     blue patch in Aristarchus. Other areas checked for colour and 
     none sen elsewhere. Attempts were made to contact observers 
     elsewhere but with no success. Sketch made and shows the patch 
     covering the floor area of Aristarchus and extending out beyond 
     the east rim. Patch was elliptical in shape and the semi-major 
     diameter was approximately 2/3rds of the diameter of 
     Aristarchus, or about 27 km. The event lasted 5 hours and 
     gradually faded. NASA catalog weight=5 (very high quality)". 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-09 UT 16:28-18:20 Ill=98% Madler observed by Gray_R on 2005-10-17

     Madler 2005 Oct 17 UT 04:14-05:28 Observed by Robin Gray (Winnemucca, 
     NV, USA, 152mm refractor, x228, x343, S=5-8 and T=5-6) "Very bright 
     pinpoint spot seen towards end of observing period on east crater wall, 
     lasting 1 min in duration. Brighter than other spots, possibly 8.5-9 on 
     the Elger scale. The spot was not seen earlier during the long 
     observing session." An ALPO report. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-09 UT 17:21-18:20 Ill=98% Madler observed by Haas_W on 1940-9-16

     Madler 1940 Sep 16 UT 02:10 Observed by Haas (New Mexico? USA, 
     12"  reflector?) "Bright spot on S. rim was I=5.8 comp. with 8.9 
     on Aug 17 (see #470)." NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID #
     473. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:41-13:54 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Aristarchus 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by 
     Argentiere et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm 
     reflectors) Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) 
     during a  lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID 
     #658. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:41-13:54 Ill=100% Byrgius observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Byrgius 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere 
     et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm reflectors) 
     Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) during a  
     lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #658. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:41-13:54 Ill=100% Kepler observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Kepler 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere et 
     al. (France?) "Crater was extra-ordinarily bright". NASA catalog 
     weight=3 and catalog ID #658. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:41-13:54 Ill=100% Manilius observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Manilius 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere 
     et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm reflectors) 
     Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) during a  
     lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #658. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:41-13:54 Ill=100% Proclus observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Proclus 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere 
     et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm reflectors) 
     Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) during a  
     lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #658. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:41-13:54 Ill=100% Tycho observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17 *

     Tycho 1956 Nov 17/18 UTC 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere et al. 
     (France?) "Crater was extra-ordinarily bright". NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #658.


2020-Jan-10 UT 11:41-15:31 Ill=100% Kepler observed by Wildey on 1962-7-17 *

     Kepler 1962 Jul 17 UTC 06:24,08:36 Observed by Wildey, Pohn (Mt Wilson, 
     CA, USA, 60" reflector+photometer) "Crater was at Vmag 2.68 at earlier 
     obs. which was .47 mag brighter than av. mag. at 15d & it faded to near 
     normal at later time to V=3.10(photom. measures), a change of 1/2 mag. 
     or @1.5 times in brightness" NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA 
     catalog ID #761.


2020-Jan-10 UT 13:16-13:21 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1956-11-18

     On 1956 Nov 18 at UT 00:00? an unknown observer (Cameron gives an AGU 
     meeting reference) apparently saw a TLP in Aristarchus crater. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=657 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 13:16-13:25 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Budine on 1964-12-19

     On 1964 Dec 19 at UT 03:13-03:14 Budine and Farrell (Binghamton, New 
     York, USA, 4" refractor, x200, S=7, T=5) observed that Aristarchus 
     brightened five times over 1 minute during a lunar eclipse. The cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=870 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 13:16-13:57 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Titulaer_C on 1964-6-25

     On 1964 Jun 25 at UT ~01:07 Titulaer (Utrecht, the 
     Netherlands) observed that Aristarchus crater was very bright 
     during an eclipse. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=822 and weight=4. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 13:16-13:57 Ill=100% Grimaldi observed by Azevado on 1964-6-25

     On 1964 Jun 25 at UT ~01:07 Rubens de Azevedo (Brazil) observed 
     a white streak from Grimaldi on the limb, during an eclipse. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=822 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 13:43-15:22 Ill=100% Unknown observed by Miranova on 1960-9-6

     On 1960 Sep 04 at UT00:00? Miranova (Russia or Israel) observed a TLP 
     at an unnamed lunar feature: "Spectral photom. of some lunar obj. in 
     4250, > 5000A bands. Spectral plates". Cameron suspects luminescence? 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=730 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 13:48-17:44 Ill=100% Kepler observed by Wildey on 1962-7-17 *

     Kepler 1962 Jul 17 UTC 06:24,08:36 Observed by Wildey, Pohn (Mt Wilson, 
     CA, USA, 60" reflector+photometer) "Crater was at Vmag 2.68 at earlier 
     obs. which was .47 mag brighter than av. mag. at 15d & it faded to near 
     normal at later time to V=3.10(photom. measures), a change of 1/2 mag. 
     or @1.5 times in brightness" NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA 
     catalog ID #761.


2020-Jan-10 UT 13:50-14:32 Ill=100% Atlas observed by Chernov on 1950-4-2

     In 1950 Apr 02 at UT 20:00 Chernov (Russia) observed two dark spots in 
     Atlas during a penumbral phase of a lunar eclipse to quickly darken and 
     become sharp in detail. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=524 and weight=1. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 14:48-16:45 Ill=100% Tycho observed by Chrevremont on 1898-1-8

     On 1898 Jan 08 at UT 00:00-01:00 Chrevremont (France?) notcied that 
     during a lunar eclipse, the mid-eclipse shadow was so dark that details 
     of the surface disappeared, all except for the Tycho SSW ray . Cameron 
     comments that it is unsual for that ray to remain when usually the ones 
     towards Kepler and Aristarchus are the ones to stand out? The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=297 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:09-15:56 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Cameron_W on 1968-4-13

     On 1968 Apr 13 at UT05:00-05:45 Cameron and Laczo (Greenbelt, MD, USA, 
     6" refractor, x50, 36" reflector x400, 12" reflector x80, seeing= 
     excellent) observed for the folliwing craters: Aristarchus, Pytheas, 
     Euler?, Censorinus, Plinius?, Proclus, Menelaus, Manilius: "Star-like 
     pts. in the craters. Only Aris. identified certainly, rest fairly 
     certain except Euler & Plinius. Seen in 6-in refr. at 50x but not in 
     36-in refl. at 400x where they were bright, but not star-lie pts. Seen 
     later in 12-in refl. at 80x. In another bldg. Seen 1st @ 1/2h before 
     totality ended, but not earlier dur. tot. tho't by author (WSC) to be 
     geom. & instrumental = power effect". Chilton, K.E. reports in RASCJ 
     that another observer did not report any of what the Greenbelt observers
     saw at all?The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1065 and weight=4. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:09-16:04 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Moore on 1975-11-18

     On 1975 Nov 18 at UT 19:38-23:34 Moore (Johannesburg, South Africa, 2" 
     refractor, S=II), Peters (Kent, UK, 8.5" reflector, x120, S=IV), Good 
     (Guilford, UK, binoculars), Foley (Dartford, Kent, UK, 12" reflector 
     and photographs), and McKay (Kingston, England, UK, 6" reflector, x48) 
     observed the following in Aristarchus during a lunar eclipse: "It 
     appeared much fainter than ever before seen in ecl. by Moore. Fainter 
     than Proc., Cop., & Tycho. Others rated brightness in order-- Hell, 
     Stevinus, Furnerius, proc.; & Proc., Tycho, Hell, Aris. Photos 
     confirmed dimness of it. For some observers it became invis. at S=II 
     (good). Good ranked at least 4 other craters brighter than Aris. & that 
     at 2035h it dimmed. Earthshine cond. extraordinarily good. Peters, at 
     S=IV (fair?) rated Aris. brightest". At 23:50UT LeCroy Jr and Sr 
     (Springfield, VA, 4.5" reflector, S=7) observed four glowing spots on 
     the Moon during a lunar eclipse (including Aristarchus). At 23:50UT 
     Aristarchus was an oval shape with no details seen. It had a ray 
     extending from the south west rim (normal). The north rim was slightly 
     blue and the south west rim very very slightly red. At 23:55UT it was 
     clearing and details showed. At 00:02UT it was clear. Sketches were 
     provided. Cameron comments that the colours fit Fitton's predictions on 
     spectral dispersion in our atmosphere from atmospheric inversions. The 
     brightness measued was 10+ and normal should be 9, and the plain is 
     4.5. The Moon's altitude at the LeCroy site was 45 deg. The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=1418-1420 and weight=5 (1-0 for LeCroy report). The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:12-16:00 Ill=100% N_Pole observed by Unknown_Observer on 1892-5-11

     On 1892 May 11 at 22:53UT an Unknown observer, during a partial eclipse 
     noticed an extension of the Earth;s shadow beyond the north cusp. 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=278 and weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:12-16:00 Ill=100% S_Pole observed by Unknown_Observer on 1892-5-11

     On 1892 May 11 at 22:53UT an Unknown observer, during a partial eclipse 
     noticed an extension of the Earth's shadow beyond the south cusp. 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=278 and weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:20-16:39 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Kolovos_G on 1989-8-17

     On 1989 Aug 17 at UT 01:02-04:20 G. Kolvos (Thesaloniki, Greece, 
     4"reflector) measured (using photometry) that although there was a 
     gradual fade over the Moon as the eclipse progressed, there was a 2"% 
     rise in brightness of Aristarchus.Graphs were submitted and photos. 
     A.C. Cook supplied CCD images and CCD photometry. A photograph by 
     Conway (Sun Prarie, WI, USA) at the start of the eclipse reveal a 
     bright colourless spot (aparently confirmed). The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=373 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 15:51-17:40 Ill=100% Mare_Serenitatis observed by Unknown_British_Observers on 1979-3-13

     On 1979 Mar 13 (UT not given) an unknown observer (UK?) during a 
     partial lunar eclipse observed an anomolous brightening in the umbra in 
     the form of a large diamond shape between mare Serenitatis and the 
     Moon's limb, just shortly after mid eclipse (UT 21:08).


2020-Jan-10 UT 16:21-18:00 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Johnson_SJ on 1902-10-17

     In 1902 Oct 17 at UT 04:35-06:00 Seen by S.J. Johson and also in 
     another report(s) by Brink, Swift, Wilson () observed a 
     "Dark band, no color, across center of moon dur. ecl. Copernicus 
     brighter than Tycho. Aristarchus brightest of all. Drawing by Brink & 
     Wilson at 1725(=0525UT)(Confirm. -- time given=16th at 1635-1800 = 17th 
     at 0435-0600 on present UT system". The Cameron 1978 vatalog ID=314 and 
     weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 16:33-18:06 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by deWitt on 1935-7-16

     In 1935 Jul 16 at UT 05:01 deWitt (Nashville, Tennessee, USA, 12" 
     reflector) "Photos in lunar ecl. indicate a probable fading of Grim. 
     floor a possible fading of S. tip of Ricc. spot, a possible enlargement 
     of halo around Linne, a possible, but unlikely darkening of Schick's 
     dark areas & no effect on Eratosthenes or white spot E. of Webb. Linne 
     enlargement more pronounced at 1902 ecl. than at any other time. Fading 
     of Ric. spot was pronounced on May 14, 1938". The Cameron 1978 catalog 
     ID=413 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 16:47-18:40 Ill=100% Moon observed by deMoraes on 1893-4-1

     On 1893 Apr 01 at UT 22:00 deMoraes of the Azores, Portugal, saw a 
     shaft of light projecting from the Moon. Cameron 1978 catalog ID=280 
     and weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 17:20-19:13 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Unknown_Observer on 1963-7-6

     On 1963 Jul 06 UT 20:35-23:00 during a partial eclipse of the Moon, 
     some feathery fingers of light were seen in the shadow.


2020-Jan-10 UT 17:35-19:12 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Bye on 1884-10-4

     On 1884 Oct 04 at UT 22:00 Bye (Brussels, Belgium) observed
     during an eclipse that the peaks were visible as brilliant 
     points with slight red aureoles during a lunar eclipse. 
     Cameron says that this was a confirmation of #2443. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and the weight=5. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 17:38-19:15 Ill=100% Tycho observed by Parsehlan on 1884-10-4

     Parsehlan of England? saw Tycho as a 2nd magnitude star during a total 
     lunar eclipse. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=244 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 17:46-18:24 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Genin on 1921-10-16

     In 1921 Oct 16 at UT 22:00-00:00 Genin and others (Russia) observed 
     during a partial eclipse that different parts of Aristarchus crater had 
     brightness of phosphorecence. Cameron says that this is independent 
     confirmation. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=383 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3. 


2020-Jan-10 UT 17:46-19:19 Ill=100% Riccioli observed by Chernov on 1963-7-6

     On 1963 Jul 06 at UT 21:00 (estimated) Chernov (Russia) observed that 
     the dark spot in Riccioli size increased suddenly during a lunar 
     eclipse as it entered the shadow, before merging with the shadow. The 
     mid eclipse was at 22:03UT. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=774 and 
     weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2020-Jan-10 UT 17:57-19:19 Ill=100% Riccioli observed by Chernov on 1971-8-6

     On 1971 Aug 06 at UT 20:30 Chernov (Crimea?, Ukraine, Soviet Union) 
     observed a dark spot in Riccioli that was very dark for 3 minutes, 
     before coming out of shadow - however the dimensions were normal. This 
     was during the lunar eclipse. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1305 and 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 18:26-19:19 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Bagby_JP on 1956-11-18

     On 1956 Nov 18 J.P. Bagby organized a lunar eclipse observing session 
     in the USA. He recorded 35 bright objects against the Moon, 5 of these 
     were seen by 3 other observers. J. Mavrogianis and 4 other observers 
     observed 25 transient luminous objects - mostly stationary yellow 
     flashes. However another group at Cheyenne noted a 4 sec duration 
     light. This report is described in H. Hars "The Total Lunar Eclipse of 
     November 18, 1956", Strolling Astronomer, 11:64, 1957.


2020-Jan-10 UT 18:27-19:19 Ill=100% Atlas observed by Chernov on 1971-8-6

     On 1971 Aug 06 at UT 21:00 Chernov (Crimea?, Ukraine, Soviet Union) 
     observed that two large spots in Atlas were not visible in the penumbra 
     after totality (brighter than normal?). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=
     1306 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 18:48-19:19 Ill=100% Delambre observed by LeCroy on 1975-11-18

     On 1975 Nov 18/19 at UT 23:15-0005 LeCroy Jr and Sr (Springfield, VA, 
     4.5" reflector, S=7) observed that Delambra was one of four glowing 
     spots on the Moon during a lunar eclipse (including Aristarchus). At 
     23:50UT 3 of these patches emerged from the dark and appeared as bright 
     spots compared to other craters "Älbedo=10+". The Albedos of Manilius 
     and Delambre were 8.5 at 00:05UT. Details became apparent in all 3 
     features. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1419 abd weight=0. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 18:48-19:19 Ill=100% Manilius observed by LeCroy on 1975-11-18

     On 1975 Nov 18/19 at UT 23:15-0005 LeCroy Jr and Sr (Springfield, VA, 
     4.5" reflector, S=7) observed that Manilius was one of four glowing 
     spots on the Moon during a lunar eclipse (including Aristarchus). At 
     23:50UT 3 of these patches emerged from the dark and appeared as bright 
     spots compared to other craters "Älbedo=10+". The Albedos of Manilius 
     and Delambre were 8.5 at 00:05UT. Details became apparent in all 3 
     features. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1419 abd weight=0. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 18:48-19:19 Ill=100% Menelaus observed by LeCroy on 1975-11-18

     On 1975 Nov 18/19 at UT 23:15-0005 LeCroy Jr and Sr (Springfield, VA, 
     4.5" reflector, S=7) observed that Menelaus was one of four glowing 
     spots on the Moon during a lunar eclipse (including Aristarchus). At 
     23:50UT 3 of these patches emerged from the dark and appeared as bright 
     spots compared to other craters "Älbedo=10+". At 23:55UT a ray appeared 
     out of the north east rim of menelaus (Normal?). It appeared just 
     before the artea emerged and increased in brightness. At 23:58UT it 
     decreased and continued to do so. The north east edge of Menelaus 
     appeared very dark at the point that the ray was extending from SW edge 
     (a ridge there) and apperared to obscure features along its path 
     (Albedo=9). The Albedos of Manilius and Delambre were 8.5 at 00:05UT. 
     At 00:05UT the rays were still apparent but seemed to have returned to 
     normal. Details became apparent in all 3 features. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=1419 abd weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-11 UT 12:37-14:10 Ill=99% Copernicus observed by Rawlings_G on 1978-4-23 *

     On 1978 Apr 23 at UT20:35 (Rawlings, UK, finderscope, x50) 
     observed a bright flash (~0.3 sec duration) near to Copernicus (20W, 
     9N) with rays to the south east whilst he looked through a finder 
     scope. Moore, who studied the drawing, suggests that the area of the 
     flash was near Copernicus. However Cameron says this cannot be the case 
     if the flash was in darkness as mentioned in the BAA Lunar Section 
     circular. She comments that it might have been a meteor? The Cameron 
     2005 catalog ID=28 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-11 UT 14:09-14:30 Ill=99% Littrow observed by Unknown_English_Observer on 1915-1-31

     Littrow 1915 Jan 31 UTC 22:00? Observer: unknown (England?) "6 to 7 
     spots arranged like a gamma first seen on this nite. (Kuiper atlas. 
     Rect. 14-c shows spots in form of a 7 or a cap. gamma backwards, but 
     not l.c. gamma)". NASA catalog weight=0 (almost certainly not a TLP). 
     NASA catalog ID #349. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-11 UT 14:09-14:29 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Thomas on 1970-2-22

     Aristarchus 1970 Feb 22 UTC 07:00? Observed by Thomas, Stump, Corral. 
     Obs. (Organ Pass, NM, 24" reflector+Moonblink) "Bluing around crater -- 
     vis. in monitor, but not photographable due to clouds." NASA catalog 
     weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #1235.


2020-Jan-11 UT 15:54-17:26 Ill=99% Proclus observed by Green_SM on 1938-11-8

     Proclus 1938 Nov 08 UTC 20:00 Observed by Green (England? Seeing = 
     good) "2 bright spots in Schmidt & Wilkins' craterlets. Was struck by 
     whitish aspect of parts of floor -- possibly mists. S.wall concealed by 
     these strong white patches, as if breached ring." NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #443.


2020-Jan-11 UT 16:14-18:11 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-18

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 18 UTC 09:54 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness of the area of over a mag. during the nite. 
     Recorded at Vmag=3.56 first, & a few min(?) later at 4.62. It was .95 
     mag. brighter (@2.5x) than av. for that age & then returned to 
     normal." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID #762.


2020-Jan-11 UT 17:03-18:33 Ill=99% Proclus observed by Darling_D on 1989-2-22

     On 1989 Feb 22 at UT03:48-03:58 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 3" 
     refractor, x56, seeing=4/10 and transparency=4) found that the floor of 
     Proclus was a "uniform grey" shade and the east wall was bright. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=357 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-11 UT 17:54-19:25 Ill=99% Macrobius observed by McLeod on 1938-11-8

     Macrobius 1938 Nov 08 UTC 18:00? Observed by McLeod (England? 5" ? 
     reflector) "Changes in dark areas. (near Proclus where Green saw 
     phenomenom. see #443)" NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #
     444.


2020-Jan-11 UT 18:33-20:28 Ill=99% Gassendi observed by Haas_W on 1940-9-18

     Gassendi 1940 Sep 18 UTC 03:15 Observed by Haas (New Mexico? 12" 
     ? reflector) "Largest bright spot in SE part of floor had I=6.1, 
     but I=6.7 & 8.6 on other nites. (same ph. see #469, 472 & 475)" 
     NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID #474. ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2020-Jan-11 UT 18:34-20:10 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1992-7-16

     On 1992 Jul 16 at UT 03:32-09:31 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     3" refractor, x134) detected yellow on the southern rim of Aristarchus, 
     and the colour looked "darker" through a yellow filter and the region 
     was "duller" than normal. The region was 1 intesnsity step brighter on 
     the 2nd measurement, "on all points in it". The comet tail-like ray had 
     3 sections and was "mottled" in appearance. Finally the Cobra Head 
     region had possible variations in brightness. The cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=451 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.  


2020-Jan-11 UT 18:40-20:28 Ill=99% Picard observed by Ingall on 1864-10-16

     East of Picard 1864 Oct 16/17 UT 23:00-01:00? Observed by 
     Ingall (Camberwell ?, UK) "Remarkable bright spot" NASA 
     catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #135. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-12 UT 14:05-17:47 Ill=96% Plato observed by Haas_W on 1938-6-15 *

     Plato 1938 Jun 15 UTC 08:00 Observed by Haas? (New Mexico?, 12?" 
     reflector) "NW. end of floor had intensity I=2.0, but on 7/15/38, I=
     3.7, conditions similar." NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID 
     #439.


2020-Jan-12 UT 14:54-15:54 Ill=95% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-19

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 19 UTC 07:30 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness from Vmag=3.46 to V=3.07, where av. mag. for that 
     age=3.26, or a brightening of .58 mag." NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog ID #763.


2020-Jan-12 UT 16:06-18:03 Ill=95% Unknown observed by Cragg on 1965-5-18

     On 1965 May 18 at UT 03:00-03:30 Cragg (Mt Wilson?, CA, USA, 6" 
     refractor?) observed a TLP (no feature nor description given in 
     the Cameron 1978 catalog) on the Moon. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=877 
     and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-12 UT 16:15-18:13 Ill=95% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-19

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 19 UTC 09:48 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness from Vmag=3.46 to V=3.07, where av. mag. for that 
     age=3.26, or a brightening of .58 mag." NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog ID #763.


2020-Jan-12 UT 17:33-19:17 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Pedler_J on 1990-1-13

     On 1990 Jan 13 at UT 22:15-23:05 J. Pedler (Bristol, UK, seeing=III and 
     transparency=excellent, no spurious colour) detected a blue region on 
     the north of Aristarchus, varying in sharpness/diffuseness. The crater 
     rim in this region could not be descerned. Eleswhere the crater rim was 
     normal as too were other features. When a Moon blink device was used, 
     no colour blink was detected, however through the blue filter the 
     suspected area was bright and the crater rim indistinct. Whereas 
     through the red filter the area looked perfectly normal. At 22:30UT the 
     effect had vanished and everywhere was normal. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=388 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-12 UT 20:32-21:27 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Cook_MC on 1990-1-14

     On 1990 Jan 14 at UT 01:14-01:55 M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, seeing=poor) 
     observed that Aristarchus did not appear normal for this illumination. 
     the northern half of Aristarchus was "2x>" than the southern half of 
     the crater. There were two white patches of apron material near to the 
     crater Herodotus that were 50% of the brightness of the southern half 
     of Aristarchus. Furthermore the southern half of Aristarchus had a 
     circle - "dull patch on inner S wall with a bright point shining 
     through it. (Bartlett's EWBS?)". The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=389 and 
     the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-12 UT 20:43-21:27 Ill=95% Peirce observed by Darling_D on 1980-3-4

     On 1980 Mar 04 at UT10:30-10:34 D. Darling (Sun Prairie, WI, USA, 
     12.5" reflector, x344) detected a pin-point light in the shadowed area 
     of Mare Crisium that varied in brightness then faded. Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=84 and weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-12 UT 20:48-21:27 Ill=95% Gassendi observed by Haas_W on 1940-9-19

     Gassendi 1940 Sep 19 UTC 06:00 Observed by Haas (New Mexico, 
     12?" reflector) "Largest bright spot in SE part of floor, had I=
     6.7, but 6 for last nite & 5.6 on others (see #'s 469, 472, & 
     474)." NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID #475. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2020-Jan-13 UT 16:02-17:53 Ill=89% Aristarchus observed by Brook_C on 2002-5-30

     On 2002 May 30 at UT02:30-02:44 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK) suspected that 
     Aristarchus crater looked dimmer than normal. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-14 UT 16:08-17:57 Ill=81% Romer observed by Darling_D on 1979-8-12

     On 1979 Aug 12 at UT07:00-10:35 D. Darling and wife (Sun Prarie, WI, 
     USA, 12.5" reflector, x342, photos, S=9/10) observed a cigar shaped 
     protruberance in Romer crater that cast a 32km long shadow, nestled in 
     a valley rille next to Romer. This was a confirmed observation. The 
     effect persisted intil sunset. The top of the object and two points on 
     the crater rim were reflecting the Sun's rays. "Top of obj. & 2 pts on 
     crater rim reflected suns rays. It was as high as the crater rim 
     whereas the rill wall was not. Took photos. he has studied this area 
     and never saw such a phenom before. Photos did not show it". The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=65 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-14 UT 19:45-21:29 Ill=80% Aristarchus observed by Dachille on 1957-10-13

     Observed by Dachille & daughter (Univ. Park, Pennsylvania, 10.5"
     reflector, x75) "Flash -- then a brownish - red color patch. Alt. @
     20deg. (MBMW has Oct. 12, but is 13th UT)". NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very good). NASA catalog ID #674.


2020-Jan-15 UT 18:47-19:59 Ill=70% Aristarchus observed by Doherty_EG on 1964-1-5

     In 1964 Jan 05 at UT 22:00? Doherty (Stoke-on-Trent, UK, 3" refractor, 
     8" or 10" reflector) observed aristarchus to be purplish-blue in 
     colour. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=794 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2020-Jan-16 UT 17:16-19:04 Ill=59% Gassendi observed by Whippey_MR on 1966-12-4

     Gassendi 1966 Dec 04 UTC 01:05-01:23 Observed by Whippey (Northolt? 
     England, 6" reflector, x212) "Abrupt flash of red, setling in 
     immediately to a pt. of red haze nr. NW (ast.?) wall. Continuous till 
     0123 (date given was 4-12-66 = European convention?)." NASA catalog 
     weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1000.


2020-Jan-16 UT 17:41-18:58 Ill=59% Gassendi observed by Whippey_MR on 1966-4-12

     On 1966 Apr 12 at UT 01:05-01:23 Whippey (Northolt, England, UK, 6" 
     reflector x212) and Corralitos Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" 
     Moon Blink) observed in Gassendi: "Abrupt flash of red, settling 
     immediately to a point of red haze near NW (IAU?) wall. Continuous till 
     0123h. (Not confirmed at Corralitos Obs. MB--at same time?". The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=927 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2020-Jan-16 UT 18:47-19:59 Ill=58% Unknown observed by Markov on 1964-1-6

     On 1964 Jan 06 at 02:00? Markov and Khoshlova (Russia) observed 
     anomalous IR radiation on the Moon. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and 
     weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-16 UT 21:21-21:31 Ill=58% Kepler observed by deBerard on 1966-12-4

     Kepler 1966 DEc 04 UTC 05:10 Observed by de Beraud (Flossmoore, 
     Ilinois, USA, 6" reflector, x360, S=G) "Saw a bright area thru. blue 
     filter but could not see it in red filter. Decided it was a bluish 
     phenomenon." NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1001.


2020-Jan-17 UT 17:50-21:02 Ill=46% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-18 UT 19:21-21:18 Ill=36% Aristarchus observed by Moseley_R on 1983-12-28

     On 1983 Dec 28 at UT03:30-05:00 Moseley (Covington, England, UK, 
     seeing=V-IV and transparency=good) detected some detail within the 
     shadow under good moments of seeing. The external brightness was 
     extended to the east wall at a clock position of 9 O'clock, but did not 
     go outside the rim. It was less bright at the 11 O'clock position. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=236 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-18 UT 18:27-21:03 Ill=35% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-19 UT 19:08-21:04 Ill=25% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-20 UT 20:30-21:34 Ill=16% Posidonius observed by Dzapiashvili on 1956-7-3

     On 1956 Jul 30 at UT 19:13 Dzapiashvili (Pulkova, Russia) observed the 
     following in Posidonius: "Short term sharp changes in polarization in 
     crater (in ashen light)". The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=643 and weight=5. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=5.


2020-Jan-20 UT 19:52-21:05 Ill=16% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-21 UT 20:41-21:06 Ill=9% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-27 UT 11:18-11:23 Ill=6% Aristarchus observed by Kater_H on 1821-2-4

     1821 Feb 04 UT 17:30 "a light shone out on the Moon -- a bright 
     point of light in the lunar crater Aristarchus, which was 
     in the dark at the time. It was seen, upon the 4th and the 7th 
     of February, by Capt. Kater (An. Reg., 1821-689); and upon the 
     5th by Dr. Olbers (Mems. R.A.S., 1-159).(25) It was a light like 
     a star, and was seen again, May 4th and 6th, by the Rev. M. Ward 
     and by Francis Bailey (Mems. R.A.S., 1-159).(26) At Cape Town, 
     nights of Nov. 28th and 29th, 1821, again a star-like light was 
     seen upon the Moon (Phil. Trans., 112-237).(27). ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2020-Jan-27 UT 11:18-11:23 Ill=6% S_Pole observed by Franks on 1912-3-20

     On 1913 Mar 20 at UT 19:00? Franks saw the south horn of the Moon to be 
     prolonged along the Leibnitz Mountains as a feeble line of light well 
     into the dark side. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=335 and the weight=1. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-28 UT 11:17-11:56 Ill=11% Aristarchus observed by Olbers on 1821-2-5

     In 1821 Feb 05 at UT18:00? Garding (Breman, Germany, x132) saw a cloudy 
     spot in Aristarchus crater. Olbers (Breman, Germany, x44 refractor) 
     though thought this description was due to the magnification used, 
     however they themselves did report a 6th magnitude star (Mems. 
     R.A.S., 1-159).(25). 3-4'in diameter. Browne (England) also saw the 
     event. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=84 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=4.


2020-Jan-28 UT 11:17-11:56 Ill=11% Promontorium_Olivium observed by Rodriguez_H on 1988-2-20

     On 1988 Feb 20 at UT22:25-22:34 H. Rodriguez Moreira (Fortaleza, 
     Brazil, 4" refractor) observed a rapid rise in brightness at 
     22:25UT in Promintorium Olivium. About 4 minutes after this the 
     brighness fluctuated 3 times and the TLP faded in 9 minutes 
     after it started, returning everything to normal. "Bluish light 
     point on darkside of it" - apparently a Greek observer (Aguirre) 
     observed a flash but no date was given. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=317 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-28 UT 11:48-11:58 Ill=12% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-29 UT 11:17-12:25 Ill=18% Aristarchus observed by Kater_H on 1821-2-6

     On 1821 Feb 06 at UT 18:00-19:00 At 18:00UT H. Kater (London, UK), 
     Olbers (Bremen, Germany), Browne (UK), commented that Aristarchus 
     looked like a 6-7th magnitude lumninous star, some 3-4' in diameter. At 
     19:00UT Aristarchus looked like a cloudy spot according to Ward and 
     Bailley (England, large telescope, x80). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=
     84-85 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-29 UT 11:20-12:07 Ill=18% Aristarchus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1961-4-19

     On 1961 Apr 19 at UT 20:00? an unknown observer reported in Aristarchus 
     a light flash for 15 seconds. Cameron suspects a meteor? The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=735 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-29 UT 11:36-12:25 Ill=18% Aristarchus observed by Amery_GW on 1981-6-6

     On 1981 Jun 06 at UT 21:30 G.W. Amery (Reading, UK, 10" reflector, 
     seeing III) observed that Aristarchus was "quite distinctly even in 
     twilight & Moon's altitude. Remaining dark areas were just visible".
     The 2006 Cameron catalog ID=142 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2020-Jan-29 UT 12:12-12:25 Ill=18% Aristarchus observed by Schroter on 1786-12-24

     Schroter observed Aristarchus to be extraordinarily bright on the dark
     side of the Moon. Cameron 1978 catalog ID=30 and weight=4. ALPO/BAA 
     catalog weight=2.


2020-Jan-29 UT 11:48-12:27 Ill=19% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-30 UT 11:16-11:36 Ill=26% Aristarchus observed by Joulia on 1931-2-22

     On 1931 Feb 22 at UT 20:30 Joulia (Castelnaudary, Aude, France?) 
     observed in the Aristarchus region: "Reddish-yellow glimmer of light, 
     very variable with nearly complete extinction. (similar to Herschel's 
     1787 & Tempel's 6/10/1866 obs.)". The Cameron 1978 atalog ID=399 and 
     weight=3.


2020-Jan-30 UT 12:00-12:53 Ill=26% Aristarchus observed by Elger_TG on 1867-4-9

     On 1867 Apr 09 at UT 19:30-21:00 Elger(Liverpool? UK, 4"? aperture 
     telescope) observed that Aristarchus was shining like a 7th magnitude 
     star-like point, becoming fainter, almost extinguished at 9PM. He had 
     seen lights before but never so strong. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=151 
     and he weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-30 UT 12:03-12:53 Ill=26% Mare_Crisium observed by Cassini_GD on 1672-2-3

     Nebulous appearance. Cameron 1978 catalog assigns
     an ID No. of 12 and a weight of 1. ALPO/BAA catalog
     assigns a weight of 1.


2020-Jan-30 UT 11:47-12:55 Ill=27% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-31 UT 11:16-12:13 Ill=35% Ross_D observed by Harris on 1967-12-8

     Ross D 1967 Dec 8 UT 02:30-02:40 Observer: Harris (Tucson?, 
     AZ?), colourless bright area SW of Ross D with repeated 
     condensations that appeared then dissipated in thirty seconds to 
     a minute. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-31 UT 11:16-12:38 Ill=35% Ross_D observed by Mt_Wilson on 2018-6-19

     2018 Jun 19 UT 04:00 G. Cross, using a 60" f/16 Cass, Strehl > 
     0.9, under descent seeing conditions, found that the ghost 
     crater was not visible - was this an obscuration or just 
     normal apeparance? ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-31 UT 11:29-12:56 Ill=35% Censorinus observed by Nicolini on 1959-9-8

     Censorinus 1959 Sep 08 UT 22:45-23:50 Observed by Jean Nicolini 
     (Brazil) "Much brighter than Proclus" NASA catalog weight=2. 
     NASA catalog ID #721. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-31 UT 12:56-13:20 Ill=35% Theophilus observed by Dieke on 1964-5-18

     Theophilus 1964 May 18 UTC 01:05-01:15 Observed by Dieke (Baltimore, 
     MD, USA, 6" refractor, x125) "Crescent of crsimson color on SW between 
     rim & flor. Was not present at 0500, nor did it reappear from 0115 to 
     0245h" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #812.


2020-Jan-31 UT 11:46-13:22 Ill=35% Earthshine: sporadic meteors