TLP Repeat Illumination/Libration and Earthshine predictions for: Russia - Novokuznetsk



Ill is percentage illumination of the Moon
*Indicates a repeat illumination and libration event to within +/- 1 deg for both
A non-* indicates just repeat illumination to within +/-0.5 deg


2018-Sep-01 UT 16:17-19:57 Ill=65% Plato observed by Mobberley_M on 1982-8-11 *

     On 1982 Aug 11 at UT03:30-04:15 Mobberley (Suffolk, UK) obtained a 
     photograph and made a sketch that revealed a needle-like shadow from 
     the west wall to near by the central craterlet - the latter was quite 
     clearly visible. What were not visible were the other four craterlets. 
     The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=183 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-01 UT 18:01-19:01 Ill=64% Alphonsus observed by Kozyrev on 1958-11-3

     Alphonsus 1958 Nov 03 UT 02:30-03:30 Observed by Kozyrev, 
     Ezerski (Pulkova Observatory, Crimea, Ukraine, 50" reflector, 
     23A/mm spectrograph) UT03:00-03:30 "C.p. redder than rest; 
     emiss. spect. in 4756A, 4100, 3950A (C3), 5165, 5130A (Swann 
     bands) 3 spect. over 3.5 h. Image of c.p. weakened in viol. 
     light on spect. Noted visual decrease in brightness & reddish 
     glow. Decrease in bright, & unnusual white color(at 0300h-
     0330h). Sudden decrease in vis. bright. Spect. started -- 
     gave norm. Spect. (0330-0340h), conditions almost identical to 
     Alter's on Oct. 26, 1956. Nothing seen on Nov. 2-3" NASA catalog 
     weight=5. NASA catalog ID #703. ALPO/BAA weight=5.


2018-Sep-01 UT 19:28-20:31 Ill=64% Archimedes observed by Darling_D on 1981-9-20

     On 1981 Sep 20 at UT 08:00-09:40 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5" reflector, x342, seeing=excellent) detected the small crater on 
     its western rim But not on the eastern floor. This was odd because both 
     are equal in size, furthermore smaller craters could be seen and the 
     Moon was at a high altitude above the horizon, so seeing not a problem. 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=154 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2018-Sep-01 UT 19:52-21:49 Ill=64% Aristarchus observed by Sage_VA on 1978-10-23

     Aristarchus 1978 Oct 23 UT 06:30-06:34 V.A. Sage (Bristol, UK, 
     10.25" reflector, x250, Wratten 44a and 25, seeing II) noted 
     that Aristarchus was surrounded by a dark area in the blue 
     filter. They did not regard this as a TLP at the time. However 
     because Aristarchus is surrounded by blue material in real life, 
     this should have been brighter? For this reason, despite the 
     observer regarding this as a negative TLP, an ALPO/BAA weight=1 
     has been applied.


2018-Sep-02 UT 19:06-22:46 Ill=53% Gassendi observed by Foley_PW on 1977-11-3 *

     On 1977 Nov 03 at 22:13UT P.W. Foley (Kent, UK, 11" reflector, x285)saw 
     some flickering in Gassendi (Clouds on limb - according to Csmeron?). 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=18 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-02 UT 19:13-20:54 Ill=53% Plato observed by Arsyukhin on 1981-12-19

     On 1981 Dec 19 at UT 01:00-05:00 E.V. Arsyukhin (Moscow, Russia, 3" 
     reflector) observed that Plato was consdierably brighter than 
     Aristarchus by several times. The image quality was very clear. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=161 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-02 UT 20:23-21:47 Ill=53% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Pickering_WH on 1891-9-25

     On 1891 Sep 25 at UT 20:00 Pickering, based at Arequipa, Peru, and 
     using a 12" reflector, saw in Schroter's Valley and the vicinity 
     "Varitions in vapor column. Time estimated from given colongitude)." 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=273 and weight=1. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-02 UT 22:40-23:28 Ill=52% Rupes_Recta observed by daSilva on 1971-6-16

     On 1971 Jun 16 at UT 07:08-07:09 Raimundo Nonato da Silva 
     (Parnaiba, PI, Brazil, 9.5" reflector, x90, seeing=good) 
     observed during a lunar eclipse that the Straight Wall 
     surroundings were darker than an observation from two days 
     earlier. At 07:09UT tonality became clearer. As dawn was in 
     progress and atmospheric turbulence, not sure if it was a TLP? 
     Other features were normal. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1297 and 
     weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-03 UT 19:16-22:49 Ill=41% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2018-Sep-04 UT 20:07-21:34 Ill=31% Limb observed by Dunn_S on 1762-6-16

     Closest parts of the Moon at Saturn appearing from
     occultation were dull and hazy. Was this an effect of
     the lunar atmosphere or a high haze and halo around the Moon?
     Cameron's 2006 catalog extension gives this an ID No. of 3
     and a weight of 1. The ALPO/BAA catalog weight is also 1.


2018-Sep-04 UT 21:44-23:32 Ill=30% Aristarchus observed by Theiss on 1973-5-27

     Aristarchus 1973 May 27 UTC 01:09-01:56 Observed by Theiss (51N, 9.67E, 
     75mm reflector) "3 diameters of Aristarchus around its center: orange 
     bright area from 01:09-01:56" Ref: Hilbrecht & Kuveler, Moon & Planets 
     Vol 30 (1984) p53-61"


2018-Sep-04 UT 20:07-22:51 Ill=29% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2018-Sep-05 UT 21:08-22:53 Ill=19% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2018-Sep-06 UT 22:17-22:57 Ill=11% Littrow observed by Scholes on 1919-12-19

     In 1919 Dec 19 at UT 04:00 Scholes (Huddersfield, England? USA) 
     observed near Littrow a conspicuous ink-black mark (North of Cape 
     Argaeus or S of  Kittrow, The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=374 and the 
     weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-06 UT 22:20-23:35 Ill=11% S_Pole observed by Hill_H on 1984-7-25

     Southern cusp obseved by H.Hill (UK) on 1984 Jul 25. Solar 
     Selenographic colongitude=232.6. Observer noted a dusky ill-
     defined strip in Earthshine extending beyond the southern cusp 
     that appeared "atmospheric". Note that this is almost certianly 
     not a TLP but is worth checking out if the libration and solar 
     colongitude is similar, just to verify that this is what the Moon 
     normally looks like. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-06 UT 22:17-22:55 Ill=11% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2018-Sep-14 UT 12:26-14:03 Ill=26% Aristarchus observed by Gamma on 1881-2-3 *

     On 1881 May 04 UT 20:00 "Gamma" a psuedonym for an astronomer 
     (Germany?) observed Aristarchus to be be a very bright 8th magnitude 
     star with pulsations. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=221 and the weight=3. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-17 UT 12:27-13:44 Ill=55% Poisson observed by Arsyukhin on 1982-8-26 *

     On 1982 Aug 26 at UT 21:00 Arsyukhin (Moscow, Russia, 3" reflector) 
     found that Poisson appeared hazy. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=181 and 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-19 UT 15:05-17:18 Ill=74% Pytheas observed by Robotham on 1982-8-29 *

     On 1982 Aug 29 at UT 02:13-02:30 Robotham (Springfield, ON, Canada, x97 
     and x160) found that the west rim of Pytheas crater was very bright, 
     especially at lower magnifications, being one of the brightest spots on 
     the Moon. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=182 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2018-Sep-22 UT 15:01-15:46 Ill=94% Eratosthenes observed by Martz_EP on 1936-5-4

     Eratosthenes 1936 May 04 UT 05:40 Observed by E.P.Martz 
     (Mandeville, Jamaica) "Detected bright spots on floor" NASA 
     catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #414. Ref. Haas, W. 
     1942, J.Royal.Ast. Soc. Canada, 36, 398. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-22 UT 15:01-15:26 Ill=94% Anaximander observed by Fisher_W on 1963-11-28

     On 1963 Nov 28 at UT 22:30-00:00 Fisher (Colefax, CA, USA, 8" 
     Newtonian reflector)observed a yellow on crater rims adjacent to
     Anaximander. Yellow colour also seen on Aristarchus that night. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-22 UT 15:01-15:07 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Leitzinger on 1972-5-25

     Aristarchus 1972 May 25 UT 19:32-19:38 Observed by Leitzinger (8.75E, 
     48.75N, Germany, 60mm f/15 telescope T=2, S=2) "Bright point at SE wall 
     well visible, colour changed to orange shortly before it disappeared" 
     published in Hilbrecht & Kuveler (1984) Moon and Planets, Vol 30, p53-61.


2018-Sep-22 UT 15:01-16:09 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Darling_D on 1979-12-2

     On 1979 Dec 02 at UT 00:36 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x349, seeing? 9-10/10 at 32 deg altitude) observed a bright 
     flash between Aristarchus and Prinz crater on the illuminated part of 
     the surface. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=76 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2018-Sep-22 UT 15:18-18:47 Ill=94% Cleostratus observed by Lord_CJR on 1974-2-5 *

     Pythagoras-Cleostratus 1974 Feb 05 UT 01:45,02:45 observed by 
     Lord (St Anne's-on-Sea, Eng., 3" refractor, x135) "Event 
     normal in integrated light. Light, full surface detail in red 
     filter, dark, with full surface detail in blue filter. Other 
     term. features did not show it. Only E.floor of Pythag., 
     Babbage northern crater chain & NW floor of Cleostr. 
     (According to Fitton's criteria this was a tenuous gas above 
     the surface. Date given as 5th, but term. was at least 3deg 
     E. Therefore these features were in the dark then. Ancill. 
     data given for 6th)." NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog 
     ID=#1387. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-22 UT 15:18-18:47 Ill=94% Pythagoras observed by Lord_CJR on 1974-2-5 *

     Pythagoras-Cleostratus 1974 Feb 05? UTC 01:45,02:45 observed by Lord 
     (St Anne's-on-Sea, Eng., 3" refractor, x135) "Event normal in 
     integrated light. Light, full surface detail in red filter, dark, with 
     full surface detail in blue filter. Other term. features did not show 
     it. Only E.floor of Pythag., Babbage northern crater chain & NW floor 
     of Cleostr. (According to Fitton's criteria this was a tenuous gas 
     above the surface. Date given as 5th, but term. was at least 3deg E. 
     Therefore these features were in the dark then. Ancill. data given for 
     6th)." NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID=#1387.


2018-Sep-22 UT 15:20-17:06 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Pasternak on 1973-4-15

     Aristarchus 1973 Apr 15 UTC 19:03-20:13 observed by Pasternak (53deg 
     20'N, 7deg 30'E, 75mm reflector) "N wall was blue to violet, beginning 
     disappearance at 20:08UT., end at 20:13UT." - Hilbrecht and Kuveler, 
     Earth, Moon & Planets, 30 (1984), p53-61


2018-Sep-22 UT 15:28-17:11 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1981-10-11

     On 1981 Oct 11 at UT04:45-05:03 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 3" 
     refractor) detected a violet tinge on the dark nimbus of Aristarchus, 
     however by 05:13 the coloured tinge had gone. Louderback suspects an 
     atmospheric effect. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=155 and weight=0. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-22 UT 16:01-17:41 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Theiss on 1973-2-15

     Aristarchus 1973 Feb 15 UTC 17:07-19:31 Observed by Theiss (51N, 9.67E, 
     75mm refractor) "Area 4-5 diameters of Aristarchus were coloured 
     clearly yellow to red" Ref: Hilbrecht & Kuveler (1984) Moon & Planets 
     30, pp53-61.


2018-Sep-22 UT 16:04-17:56 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Cardoso on 1969-7-27

     Aristarchus - 1969 Jul 27 UT 05:00-07:00 Observed by W. 
     Cardoso (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 13" Refractor) "Brightening. 
     Filter used, (Jose da Silva says obs. no good, obs. 
     inexperienced. Apollo 11 watch)." NASA catalog weight=0. SA 
     catalog ID No. 1188. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-22 UT 16:49-17:56 Ill=94% Manilius observed by Cardoso on 1969-7-27

     Manillius 1969 Jul 27 UT 05:45-05:46 Observed by Wairy Cardoso 
     (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 13" refractor, x360) "Bright spot in 
     Manillius (Apollo 11 watch, J. M. L. da Silva says obs. no good 
     because of inexper. of obs)" NASA catalog weight=0. NASA catalog 
     ID #1189. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-22 UT 17:02-17:56 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Fisher_W on 1963-11-29

     On 1963 Nov 29 at UT 01:30-03:00 Fisher (Colefax, CA, USA, 20cm 
     reflector, thin streamers of cloud across sky, but no wind) 
     Aristarchus had a faint pale yellow tint along the rim and the 
     crater was very bright. No detail seen in in Vallis Schroteri. 
     Yellow spot also seen on the northern limb (Carpenter and 
     Pythagoras?). Both effects had been seen the previous night and 
     were confirmed by friends. Colour still present when observing 
     stopped at 03:00 UT. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-22 UT 17:02-17:56 Ill=94% Carpenter observed by Fisher_W on 1963-11-29

     On 1963 Nov 29 at UT 01:30-03:00 Fisher (Colefax, CA, USA, 20cm 
     reflector, thin streamers of cloud across sky, but no wind.) 
     Carpenter had a yellow tint along the W rim. Ywllow tint seen 
     on Pythagoras and also Aristarchus. Effect had been seen the 
     previous night and were confirmed by friends. Colour still 
     present when observing stopped at 03L00 UT. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2018-Sep-22 UT 17:02-17:56 Ill=94% Pythagoras observed by Fisher_W on 1963-11-29

     On 1963 Nov 29 at UT 01:30-03:00 Fisher (Colefax, CA, USA, 20cm 
     reflector, thin streamers of cloud across sky, but no wind.) 
     Pythagoras had a yellow tint along the W rim. Ywllow tint seen 
     on Carpenter and also Aristarchus. Effect had been seen the 
     previous night and were confirmed by friends. Colour still 
     present when observing stopped at 03L00 UT. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2018-Sep-22 UT 17:31-17:56 Ill=94% Menelaus observed by Cardoso on 1969-7-27

     Menelaus 1969 Jul 27 UT 1969 Jul 27 UT 06:27-07:30 Observed by 
     Wairy Cardoso (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 13" refractor, x360) 
     "Brightening in Menelaus (Apollo 11 watch, J. M. L. da Silva 
     says obs. no good because of inexper. of obs)" NASA catalog 
     weight=0. NASA catalog ID #1189. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-22 UT 17:44-17:56 Ill=94% Alphonsus observed by McCord on 1965-10-8

     Alphonsus (black spot, upland #1) 1965 Oct 08 UT 05:48-08:23 Observed 
     by McCord (Mt Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + spectrograph) "Line 
     depth ratios a/b(H?), c/d (K?) were significantly low for upland #1 & 
     abnormally high for Alphonsus black spot, but not as pronounced as the 
     other area was high compared with 23 other areas" NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very good). NASA catalog ID #899.


2018-Sep-23 UT 14:54-16:02 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Alter on 1959-1-23

     Aristarchus 1959 Jan 23 UT 06:20 - Observer: Alter (Mt Wilson, 
     CA, 60" reflector x700) "Brilliant blue in interior later 
     turning white. Photos obtained. (MBMW has this entry twice for 
     diff. dates because source gave UT date as 23rd.)" NASA 
     catalog  weight=5. NASA catalog ID = #712. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2018-Sep-23 UT 14:54-15:27 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Crowe on 1964-9-20

     Aristarchus-Herodotus 1964 Sep 20 UTC 04:15-04:50 - Observers: Crowe & 
     Cross (Whittier, CA, USA, 19" reflector x390) "Several red spots in 
     area between the 2 craters. No change in phenom. so stopped observing"
     NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA catalog ID #849.


2018-Sep-23 UT 14:54-16:07 Ill=98% Ross_D observed by Harris on 1964-9-20

     nr.Ross D 1964 Sep 20 UTC 04:55-05:00 - Observers: Harris & Cross 
     (Whittler, CA, USA, 19" reflector x250) "Opaque, outgassing, 
     obscuration" NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID #850.


2018-Sep-23 UT 14:54-15:30 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Presson on 1965-9-9

     On 1965 Sep 09 at UT 13:20 Presson observed an orange-red srip on the 
     floor of Aristarchus. Cameron says that this was confirmed later by 
     Bartlett? The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=892 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2. 


2018-Sep-23 UT 14:54-15:28 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1979-10-4

     On 1979 Oct 04 at UT21:05-23:40 P.W. Foley (Kent, UK, 12" reflector, 
     x360, seeing=II) detected colour in Aristarchus (and also in Bullialdus 
     - there was a TLP alert at this time for Bullialdus) but nowehere else 
     on the Moon. Aristarchus had a CED brightness value of 3.8 at 21:05 
     (though at this time no colour) and 3.4 at 23:40 and the floor was now 
     slate blue/gray in colour. Other features remained constant in 
     brightness. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=72 and the weight=0. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-23 UT 16:02-17:54 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Schroter on 1788-4-19

     Near Aristarchus 1788 Apr 19 UT 20:00? Observed by Schroter 
     (Lilienthal, Germany) Event described as: "Small area very 
     brilliant & other bright spots". No additional references 
     given. NASA Catalog Event #44, NASA Weight=4. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2018-Sep-23 UT 16:02-17:58 Ill=98% Gassendi observed by Miles_H on 1968-6-9

     Gassendi 1968 Jun 09 UT 21:35-21:45 Observer: Miles (UK, 5" 
     refractor x120) "Blink inside NW wall. Trees stopped obs. at 
     2145h. At 2155h no blink vis. (Moore has date as June 6th, 1958
     =misprint? as there weren't blink sys. then. Moon at low alt 
     7deg)." NASA catalog weight=2. NASA catalog ID #1077. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2018-Sep-23 UT 16:25-18:15 Ill=98% Plato observed by Braga_R on 2013-1-25

     On 2013 Jan 25 UT 19:05-19:15 R.Braga (Milan, Italy, 115mm 
     refractor, x267, seeing III, transparency average) observed that 
     Plato in general was normal in appearance, but the east rim was 
     showing a remarkable golden (yellow-golden) hue. This was a 
     repeat illumination observation for a W.E. Fox TLp observation 
     from 1938 Feb 14. The observer was wondering whether they were 
     in some way biased after reading the original report desription 
     - so uncertain over this being a TLP. In view of uncertainty 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-23 UT 17:12-18:57 Ill=98% Plato observed by Fox_WE on 1938-2-14

     Plato 1938 Feb 14 UT 00:25 Observed by Fox (Newark, England, 
     6.5" reflector, x240) "Prominent gold-brown spot on E. wall 
     with yellow glow without definite boundary, spreading over 
     floor." NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #431. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2018-Sep-23 UT 17:42-19:34 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1976-1-15

     Aristarchus 1976 Jan 15 UT 19:30-20:50 Observed by P.W. Foley 
     (Kent, UK, 12" reflector) - Aristarchus was abnormally bright 
     (Cameron suspects that this is a confirmation an explosion 
     effect seen earlier by Greenland: "On 1976 Jan 15 at 19:45Ut 
     Greenland (Crawley, UK, 7x50 binooculars) thought that they 
     saw an "explosion" on the Moon (in the general region of 
     Aristarchus) for a fraction of a second, followed by a bright 
     spot in the same position (not an astronomer). After 
     discussions with others, decided it was a moment of transition 
     to greater intensity (better seeing?). Moore thinks it was 
     atmospheric but says it should be on record. Cmeron's 1978 
     catalog ID=1425 and weight=5". For the Foley report: Cameron 
     1978 catalog TLP ID=1427 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-23 UT 19:50-21:49 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Madej_P on 1982-11-29 *

     Aristarchus 1982 Nov 29 UT 21:47 Observed by P. Madej 
     (Huddersfield, UK) flashes seen to NW. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-24 UT 14:57-16:09 Ill=100% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Pickering_WH on 1897-6-14

     On 1897 Jun 14 at UT 23:00 Pickering (Cambridge, Mass. USA) observed in 
     "Schroter's valley and the vicinity variations in vapor colum. Break in 
     col. toward F and eruption of crater D. 3.4 d after sunrise". The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=389 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-24 UT 16:14-18:04 Ill=100% Plato observed by Chapman_BW on 1980-10-23

     Plato 1980 Oct 23 UT 21:00(+/- approx 1 hour) Observed by 
     Chapman (Kingston Upon-Thames, UK, 11.5cm refractor, seeing III, 
     transparency poor. No spurious colour seen. During one (or 
     both?) of these sessions, a Moon Blink was used and produced no 
     results on all craters tested on, apart from Plato where the SW 
     corner of the floor was brighter in red, and also visible in 
     white light, but viewing was poor and at the limit for his 
     telescope. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-24 UT 17:12-19:01 Ill=100% Cauchy observed by Pamplona on 1969-7-29

     Cauchy 1969 Jul 29 UT 06:00-06:22 Observed by Claudio 
     Pamplona and Jackson Barbosa (Fortaleza, Brazil, 2" 
     refractor) "very bright and clear(?) pulsating 3,3s,3s with 
     crater illum. then 3s area illum. red & no filter area 
     pulsated for 22m. Confirmed by Jackson (Apollo 11 watch)". 
     NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1193. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2018-Sep-24 UT 17:44-19:42 Ill=100% Torricelli_B observed by Cook_MC on 1993-4-6

     On 1993 Apr 06 at UT23:00 M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK) observed a TLP in 
     Torricelli B - "Noted that it was > yellow but only visible in mauve + 
     yellow combined". The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=460 and the weight=4. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2018-Sep-24 UT 18:34-21:00 Ill=100% Le_Verrier observed by Foley_PW on 1977-2-3 *

     Helicon A 1977 Feb 03 UT 2009-23:52 Foley and Moore observed the 
     crater to be  changing in brightness. Jewitt and Elms failed to 
     detect this. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-24 UT 19:06-23:01 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1976-1-16 *

     Aristarchus 1976 Jan 16 UT 22:00-23:15 Observed by P.W. Foley 
     (Wilmington, Kent, UK, seeing II) - Aristarchus was tremendously 
     bright. No colour seen. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-24 UT 20:59-21:00 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Rose_RW on 1973-2-17

     Aristarchus 1973 Feb 17 UTC 22:15-22:45 Observed by Rose, Hunt, 
     Robinson, Coleman (UK) described in the NASA catalog as: "Rose tho't 
     W.rampart was diffuse over 1/3 its length. Alerted Hunt who tho't there 
     was a dark patch (in poor seeing) but the diffuse effect was neg. 
     Robinson tho't things norm. also Coleman(Seeing=poor). Moore thinks not 
     real phenom. Rose used a 14", hunt a 6" and Robinson (and? Coleman) a 
     10" reflector. NASA catalog weight=1 (low). NASA catalog TLP
     ID No. 1363


2018-Sep-25 UT 13:16-15:10 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1964-9-22 *

     Aristarchus 1964 Sep 22 UT 02:54-03:03 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 4" refractor x240, S=5, T=5) "Bright blue-
     viol. gl. on NE rim & EWBS; dark viol. nimbus; S. floor 8deg br. 
     rest of crater 7 deg. Red-brown, changed to coppery, to yellow-
     brown (Gilheany, et al. examined crater later, but did not 
     detect any color in MOON BLINK, so red-brown must have 
     disappeared." NASA catalog ID #851, NASA catalog weight=4. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-25 UT 13:16-15:41 Ill=100% Kunowsky observed by Gilheany on 1964-9-22 *

     Kunowsky 1964 Sep 22 UT 03:25-04:30 Observed by Gilheany, Hall, and 
     Johnson (Port Tobacco, MD, USA, 16" reflector, Seeing=good) "Red area 
     detected by Trident's MOON BLINK (MB) device, (Aris. normal)." NASA 
     catalog weight= 5 (very high). NASA catalog ID #852.


2018-Sep-25 UT 15:07-16:25 Ill=100% Lichtenberg observed by Nicolini on 1955-5-7

     Lichtenberg 1955 May 07/08 UT 23:00-01:00 Observer: Jean 
     Nicolini (Brazil). Ref: Azevedo (1962) NASA catalog weight=1, 
     NASA catalog ID 590. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-25 UT 15:07-15:08 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1975-2-26

     Aristarcus 1975 Feb 26/27 UTC 21:00-00:30 Observed by: Foley (Kent, UK, 
     12" reflector), Kennedy (Dundee, UK, 8" reflector), Gannon (Middlesex, 
     UK, 6" reflector), Amery (Reading, UK, 10" reflector), Fitton 
     (Lancashire, UK, 8" reflector), Turner (Sussex, UK, 8" reflector) 
     "Foley) Neg. at 2100h. At 2123h NE wall was blue, decr. at 2220h. New 
     spot at 2221h due N. At 2227h blue fr. ENE to N. & faint blue on rim. 
     Interior clear detail, but obscur. at ENE-N, (Kennedy) at 2222h got 
     neg., also at 2229h-2300h. (Gannon) at 2245-2253h got neg. (Amery) at 
     2315h saw crater bright, bands clear, c.p. bright & very bright pt. to 
     NE of c.p. N. wall bluisg gray mist extending into N. part of crater. 
     Got slight blink in red till 2335h. (Fitton) at 2330h saw blue in N. 
     interior but no blink, no obscur. in long exam. Blue varied with 
     position in FOV. Polariz. with many rotations showed normal. Blue only 
     in Aris., none elsewhere till 2359h. (Turner at 2330h got neg. till 
     2359h. (Amery) at 2359h saw most detail clear. Blink distinct in red. 
     At 0030h(27th) saw blue mist now gray, seeing deteriorating. Herod. was 
     normal, (Fitton explains obs. as due to high press. system W. of
     obs with temp. inversions). NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA 
     catalog ID #1399.


2018-Sep-25 UT 16:26-18:22 Ill=99% Proclus observed by Bartlett on 1957-3-17

     "Proclus D. (Bartlett's designation) appeared as a dark spot, 
     conformable to lts appear. at col. 111.15 deg in '55. Proc. A 
     (Bartlett's designation) completely invisible the ordinarily easy to 
     see. Conspic. a' col.103.78deg in 55' & st 110.1 deg in '55, but also 
     invis. at col. 30.78deg in '56". Cameron 1978 catalog ID 665 and 
     weight=4. Observer based in Baltimore, MD, USA and used a 5" reflectore 
     x180 and S=4 and T=5. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-25 UT 16:42-18:37 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Kufer on 1972-3-30

     Aristarchus 1972 Mar 30 UTC 23:03-23:05 Observed by Kufer (11.5E, 
     48.25N, 110mm reflector) "A sudden brightening, but observations 
     limited by cloud" Ref: Hilbrecht & Kuveler Moon & Planets (1984) Vol 
     30, pp53-61.


2018-Sep-25 UT 16:48-18:44 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1957-3-17

     Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA) described in NASA 
     catalog as: "Strong viol. gl. on EWBS, whole length of E. wall. 
     Dark viol. on nimbus pale viol. on plateau m. Area was hazy -- 
     couldn't focus it. Brilliantly clear nite.3.5(?) reflector x180 
     used. NASA catalog wight=4, NASA catalog ID #665. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2018-Sep-25 UT 17:11-19:01 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by McCord on 1965-10-11

     Mare Crisium 1965 Oct 11 UTC 05:15 Observed by McCord (Mt Wilson, CA, 
     100" reflector + spectrogram) "Line depth ratios a/b (H),, c/d (K) 
     abnormally high compared with 23 other areas (including 
     Aristarchus?)." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID 902.


2018-Sep-25 UT 17:20-18:23 Ill=99% Hahn observed by Hazel_N on 2012-1-9

     On 2012 Jan 09 UT 21:01-21:08 Hahn crater was imaged by N. Hazel 
     (Beverley, Yorkshire, UK, Nikon D7000 with 70-300 zoom at max, 
     with 2x teleconverter, at f9, 1/320 sec, ISO 400  tripod 
     mounted, mirror up), A series of images were taken. The 21:06 one 
     showed a grey column cutting across the central floor of the 
     crater from the west and then bisecting the eastern rim. All 
     detail inside is completely invisble. Some (but not all) of the 
     other images showed a more blurred view of this feature. It's 
     possible that this was a seeing ripple effect, or just the 
     natural appearance of shadings on the Moon at this time, however 
     for now this will be given an ALPO/BAA weight of 1.


2018-Sep-25 UT 17:31-21:25 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Thomas on 1970-4-22 *

     Aristarchus 1970 Apr 22 UT 07:00 
     Observed by Thomas.


2018-Sep-25 UT 18:30-20:24 Ill=99% Promontorium_Agarum observed by Unknown_Observer on 1948-8-20

     In 1958 aug 20 at UT 20:00? an unknown observer noticed that 
     Promontorium Agarum appeared filled with fog or mist. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=510 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-25 UT 19:01-20:56 Ill=99% Plato observed by Gledhill on 1869-9-21

     Plato 1869 Sep 21-22? UTC 00:00? Observed by Gledhill (Halifax, UK, 9" 
     refractor) "Group I craters-notable illum. accomp. by a single light on 
     a distinct spot. (similar to Aug. obs. & if same phase as Ap 1870, date 
     =22nd.). NASA catalog weight=2 (poor). NASA catalog ID #164.


2018-Sep-25 UT 19:28-21:18 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by McCord on 1965-10-11

     Mare Crisium 1965 Oct 11 UTC 07:32 Observed by McCord (Mt Wilson, 
     CA, 100" reflector + spectrogram) "Line depth ratios a/b (H),, 
     c/d (K) abnormally high compared with 23 other areas (including 
     Aristarchus?)." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog 
     ID 902.


2018-Sep-25 UT 19:48-21:38 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1966-7-4

     Aristarchus 1966 Jul 04 UTC 06:15-06:35 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 5" reflector x142) & by Corralitos Observatory 
     (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector). "S.region of floor was granulated 
     & dull est. at 6 & pale yellow-brown tint. Rest of crater est. 8 bright 
     white. Not confirmed by Corralitos MB" S=5, T=4. NASA catalog weight=4 
     (high). NASA catalog ID #955. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-25 UT 21:25-22:20 Ill=99% Taruntius observed by Wildey on 1962-9-15

     In 1962 Sep 16 at UT08:05 Wildey, Pohn (Mt Wilson, CA, USA, 60" 
     reflector) Taruntius faded from Vmag-3.21 to 4.04, a 0.82 difference in 
     magnitude in 2.5 hours - a photometric measurement. The average 
     magnitude for this age is 4.03, so therefore the crater had brightened 
     by two times above normal. The Cameron 1978 catalogID=769 and the 
     weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-25 UT 21:47-22:20 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Moore_P on 1969-6-30

     Aristarchus 1969 Jun 30 - Jul 01 UT 23:37-00:00, 00:02-00:05 
     Observers: Moore (Sussex, UK, 12.5" reflector x360), Altizer, 
     Arabanel (Corralitos Obs., Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector) 
     "SE wall was orange, detected by Eng. MB Fading by 2353h, only a 
     trace at 2358h & disappeared at 0000h. Later at 0002-0005h 
     suspected again. Alt. was low. Bluring around crater seen at 
     Corrralitos Obs. in the MB, but immeasurable on photos." NASA 
     catalog ID #1150, NASA weight=2(for Moore), 5 (for Corralitos 
     Obs). ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-25 UT 22:06-22:20 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by McCord on 1965-10-11

     Mare Crisium 1965 Oct 11 UTC 10:10 Observed by McCord (Mt Wilson, CA, 
     100" reflector + spectrogram) "Line depth ratios a/b (H),, c/d (K) 
     abnormally high compared with 23 other areas (including 
     Aristarchus?)." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID 902.


2018-Sep-26 UT 15:21-15:59 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1965-10-12

     Aristarchus (Bartlett, 1965 Oct 12 UTC 02:15-20:25, 5 inch 
     reflector x280) - NASA catalog quotes "Nimbus was only a dark 
     violet hue". NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID #904. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-26 UT 15:21-15:43 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Robinson_JH on 1975-2-27

     Aristarchus 1975 Feb 27/28 UT 22:00-01:00 Observers: Robinson 
     (Teignmouth, England - 10" reflector), Fitton (Lancashire, England - 
     8" reflector), Amery (Reading, England - 8" reflector), Mills 
     Observatory (Dundee, Scotland, 10" reflector) - NASA catalog states: 
     "Robinson at 2200h got blink on E.wall, stong at 200x till 2225h. 
     (Fitton) at 2200h (moon low) at 200x saw vivid blue to N., vivid yellow 
     & orange to S. in Aris., Proc., Menelaus, & many other bright craters 
     til 2300h. Then Aris. less blue & mare obj. no colors. No blinks in 
     these craters. No obscur. Polariz. normal till 2330h using many 
     rotations. At 2330h Aris. blue in N. but fainter. Only Proc. remained 
     blue till 0020h (28th). Photo-electric scan at 2340h was normal for 
     Aris. (600 microamps) compared with Tycho (900 microamps), total of 10 
     scans. all neg. with 15km resolution. Blink neg. but blue still vis. in 
     N. in white light till 0030h. At 0100h (S=III at 200x) Proc. clear of 
     blue, Aris. nearly clear, blink neg. (Amery) at 2310h saw blue on N.rim 
     of Aris., no color in other craters at 300x. No blink in Aris. S. part 
     of Aris. indistinct but abnormal. No blink till 2350h. (Mills 
     Observatory) at 0000h checking rep'ts got blink in S.part of Aris. Blue 
     only in N.part. Similar blue in bright craters in E.hemisphere & blue 
     halo on S.limb till 0020h. Concluded due to optical effects. Fitton 
     says due to atm. effects from high press. sys. W. of obs (blue on one 
     rim & red on other due to chrom. aberr. ? If spurios, should get no 
     blink & similar crater conditions should exhibit same phenomena all 
     over Moon). NASA catalog weight=5. NASA catalog TLP ID No. 
     1400. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-26 UT 15:21-15:43 Ill=97% Proclus observed by Fitton on 1975-2-27

     Proclus 1975 Feb 27/28 UTC 22:00-01:00 Observers: (Fitton) at 2200h 
     (moon low) at 200x saw vivid blue to N., vivid yellow & orange to S. in 
     Aris., Proc., Menelaus, & many other bright craters til 2300h. Then 
     Aris. less blue & mare obj. no colors. No blinks in these craters. No 
     obscur. Polariz. normal till 2330h using many rotations. Only Proc. 
     remained blue till 0020h (28th). Photo-electric scan at 2340h was 
     normal for Aris. (600 microamps) compared with Tycho (900 microamps), 
     total of 10 scans. all neg. with 15km resolution. Blink neg. but blue 
     still vis. in N. in white light till 0030h. At 0100h (S=III at 200x) 
     Proc. clear of blue, Aris. nearly clear, blink neg. Concluded due to 
     optical effects. Fitton says due to atm. effects from high press. sys. 
     W. of obs (blue on one rim & red on other due to chrom. aberr. ? If 
     spurious, should get no blink &similar crater conditions should exhibit 
     same phenomena all over Moon). NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA 
     catalog TLP ID No. #1400.


2018-Sep-26 UT 16:36-18:25 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1981-10-15

     On 1981 Oct 15 at UT06:03-05:51 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     seeing=1-2 and transparency=5) The Cobra Head had a brightness of 8, 
     though normally it should be less than 7. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=
     156 and weight=3.


2018-Sep-26 UT 16:36-18:25 Ill=97% Mons_Piton observed by Louderback_D on 1981-10-15

     On 1981 Oct 15 at UT06:03-06:51 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 3" 
     refractor, seeing=1-2 and transparency=5) observed that the brightenss 
     of 4 sun lit bright spots differed in red and blue light. "Appeared as 
     a cross. the 2 points A & D on his sketch (index) were affceted. They 
     were 10 pts dimmer in red than blue. Not due to seeing as they did not 
     fluctuate (as did the seeing)." This report came from the Cameron 2006 
     catalog and had an ID No. of 156 and a weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-26 UT 17:27-19:19 Ill=97% Proclus observed by Brook_C on 2009-4-12

     On 2009 Apr 12 at UT 00:00 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, 2" refractor, x25, 
     Edmund Optics filter No. 80 (blue) and No. 47 (light rose/purple)) 
     noted that the rays of Proclus stood out better in light rose/purple 
     than in blue. Not just the rays crossing Mare Crisium. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2018-Sep-26 UT 17:31-21:25 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Thomas on 1970-4-23 *

     Aristarchus 1970 Apr 23 UTC 07:00 
     Observed by Thomas


2018-Sep-26 UT 17:45-17:58 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Moore_P on 1992-5-19

     On 1992 May 19 at UT 01:00-02:05 P. Moore (Selsey, UK, 15" reflector, 
     x260) saw at 01:25UT an unmistakable red-orange glow on the south and 
     south-east rim with the "Spur". Apparently Chapman (Kent, UK) detected 
     it easily. At 01:33UT the colour was barely visible. No TLP alert was 
     issued because the souther edge of Mons Pico also exhibited a hint of 
     colour, and anyway the seeing conditions were poor. Despite this no 
     other features revealed colour. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=446 and the 
     weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2018-Sep-26 UT 17:45-17:58 Ill=97% Mons_Pico observed by Moore_P on 1992-5-19

     On 1992 May 19 at UT 01:00-02:05 P. Moore (Selsey, UK, 15" reflector, 
     x260) noted that the southern slope of Mons Pico had a tint of colour. 
     No other features revealed colour apart from Aristarcus, where a TLP 
     was going on. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=446 and the weight=0. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2018-Sep-26 UT 18:30-20:25 Ill=97% Alphonsus observed by Whippey_MR on 1966-9-2

     Alphonsus 1966 Sep 02 UTC 03:16-04:18 Observed by Whippey (Northolt, 
     UK, 3" refractor) & Corralitos Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" 
     reflector) "A series of weak glows, final flash at 0418h. Not confirmed 
     by Corralitos MB" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID 971.


2018-Sep-26 UT 19:14-21:02 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by LeCroy on 1975-2-28

     Aristarchus and vicinity 1975 Feb 28 UT 03:20-03:45 Observers LeCroy 
     Jr & Sr (Springfield, VA, USA). NASA catalog states: "Orange flash in 
     crater that then spread over whole crater then turned to bluish haze at 
     0320h. Couldn't see surface underneath. All W. hemisphere was brighter 
     than normal. Blue was only on Aris. Rest of Moon was examined for 
     phenom. but none seen elsewhere. Gone by 0343h (just a few hrs after 
     Eng. obs. -- not likely U.S. obs. had temp. inversion high press. sys. 
     W. of him too). 4.5" reflector 45x, 150x. NASA catalog weight=4. 
     NASA catalog TLP ID No. #1401. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2018-Sep-26 UT 21:39-23:34 Ill=97% Plato observed by Kelsey on 1966-9-2

     Plato 1966 Sep 02 UT 0625 Observed by Kelsey (Riverside, California, 
     USA, 8" reflector x300) "Landslip at west would not focus. (Ricker not 
     certain it was a real LTP)." NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog 
     ID 973.


2018-Sep-26 UT 22:07-23:37 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1950-7-2

     In 1950 Jul 02 UT07:22 Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA, 3.5" 
     reflector) saw no dark bands on the inside of Aristarchus, 
     despite detail being seen elsewhere. He would normally have 
     expected to have seen bands at this colongitude, based upon past 
     observations. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-26 UT 23:04-23:37 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Brook_C on 2002-9-23

     On 2002 Sep 23 at UT22:45-23:56 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK) noticed that 
     the bands inside Aristarchus varied (UT22:45-22:56) in definition 
     whilst the rim of Herodotus and the rays of Kepler and Copernicus 
     remained sharp. These bouts of variation were 1-2min in duration. At 
     23:56UT when he checked again the periodic blurrings of the bands were 
     still present. The observer suspected atmospheric effects. M.Cook 
     (Frimley, UK) observed 22:00-22:30 and could see only 2 bands on the 
     west wall - but this may have been because of poor transparancy. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-26 UT 23:05-23:37 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1983-10-23

     Aristarchus 1983 Oct 23 UT 19:00-01:30 Observer: Foley (Kent, UK, 
     12" reflector, seeing=II) noiced at 19:00UT an extended bright 
     spot on E wall and extending beyond. This was brighter than other 
     areas of the crater. There was also occasional star-like 
     glistening. Foley comments that the inside of Aristarchus was 
     slightly obscured. The TLP started fading from UT20:30 and 
     finished by 01:30UT. six out of nine independent observers 
     confirmed the effects seen. In total 14 observers observed, 9 
     reported back and 6 found abnormalities in Aristarcus though all 
     encountered variable seeing conditions - some had spurious 
     colour. Cameron comments that this was one of the best 
     recorded/confirmed TLP events. All CED brightness measurements 
     obtained were very high. Moore, Nicolson and Clarke (5" refractor 
     and 15" reflector, 230-350xseeing III) found the crater to be 
     very bright at 19:11UT through a 5" refractor and there was a 
     blob on the east rim (Bartlet's EWBS?) at 19:14UT. Nicolson also 
     saw a very bright star-like area on the eastern wall but this was 
     not defined as it usually is. The crater was also very bright at 
     22:43UT using the 15" reflector available to these observers. At 
     01:07UT they used a Moon blink and discovered that the bright 
     region was bright in blue light and less bright in red - although 
     this was not a detactable blink when switching rapidly between 
     filters. They found that the crater had returned to normal by 
     01:15UT. M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, seeing III-IV) observed a large 
     diffuse spot on the east of the crater that was brighter in blue 
     than in red light and the CED device gave a high reading. J.D. 
     Cook (Frimley, UK, seeing III-IV) made a skecth that showed the 
     bright spot extended on the east wall - again the CED reading was 
     high and a lot of detail was visible on the floor. A.C. Cook 
     (Frimley, UK, seeing III-IV) also noted remarkable detail and the 
     bright (as confirmed by CED) blob on the eastern rim. G. North 
     (Sussex, UK, seeing III-II) also confirmed the bright blob on the 
     eastern wall. Wooller found the north west wall was a dirty 
     yellow colour - though no colour was seen elsewhere in or outside 
     the crater. Mosely found the crater to be bright and his sketch 
     revealed the extension of the bright blob on the eastern rim and 
     again a great deal of interior detail. Amery (Reading, UK, seeing 
     III) found Aristarchus to be "a brilliant splash against dulled 
     background in violet filter, especially polarizing filter. CED + 
     polarizer readings high, but not as high as previous night". 
     Mobberley (Suffolk, UK, seeing III-IV) remarked that "spurious 
     colour a total mess around Aristarchus & nothing abnormal seen". 
     A photograph was taken at 20:50UT reveals the  bright blob and 
     entire detail. Peters (Kent, UK, seeingIII-II) observed  
     Aristarchus with a UV screen from 20:15-21:23UT and comented that 
     althogh being very bright, there was no variation between white 
     and UV. It was checked with a Moon Blink device and the radial 
     bands were  clearly seen in white light, < in blue. The Cameron 
     2008 catalog ID=233 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2018-Sep-26 UT 23:06-23:37 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1964-10-23

     Aristarchus 1964 Oct 23 UTC 02:35-02:45 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 3" refractor, 133 & 200x, S=3-5, T=4) "South floor 
     region granulated, 6 deg bright with very faint trace of pale yellow 
     color; rest of crater 8 deg bright." NASA catalog weight=4 (good), NASA 
     catalog ID #859.


2018-Sep-27 UT 15:40-16:05 Ill=93% Gassendi observed by Moseley_T on 1966-9-2

     Gassendi 1966 Sep 02 UT 22:55-02:55 Observed by Moseley, Moore, 
     Gill, Harris, Frost and Hall (Armagh, Northern Ireland, 10" 
     refractor + Moon Blink, Seeing=fair) and by Cave (England using 
     a Moon blink) "Eng. Moonblink sys. detected red glows on c.p. & 
     around it; seen vis. too. (Corralitos obs.at the time? did not 
     see anything?)" Note that the Arnagh observers were all using 
     the same telesope, The observing times of M. Cave are not given 
     but they saw a blink SW of the central peaks. NASA catalog ID 
     972. NASA catalog weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-27 UT 15:40-16:38 Ill=93% Atlas observed by Pither_CM on 1969-8-1

     Atlas 1969 Aug 01 UT 03:36-04:00 Observed by Pither 
     (Nottinghamshire, England) NASA catalog reports: "Eng. moon 
     blink in crater at 0336h close to E. wall, NE of central 
     feature. Oval in shape & dirty brownish color & hazy. Started 
     fading at 0345h but may have been due to dawn, Neg results on 
     other features, (Apollo 11 watch)." 12" x450 reflector used. 
     NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog TLP ID No. #1195. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-27 UT 16:07-17:42 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by Pamplona on 1969-8-1

     Aristarchus 1969 Aug 01 UTC 04:40-05:38 Observed by C. Pamplona 
     e J. Barbosa(Fortaleza, Brazil using 12" x235 and 5" x100 
     reflectors) - NASA catalog reports: "Enhanced area in SE wall, 
     no pulsation, no color. Usually NW wall is brightest. After 
     0538h NW region was brightest again, (Apollo 11 watch, indep. 
     confirm. ?)" NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog TLP ID No. #
     1196. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-27 UT 16:26-18:22 Ill=93% Gassendi observed by Moore_P on 1966-9-3

     Gassendi 1966 Sep 03 UT 01:11-01:46 Observers: Moore (Armagh, N. 
     Ireland, 5 & 12" reflectors), Moseley (Armagh, N. Ireland, 10" 
     refractor), Corralitos Observatory (B.Middlehurst, Organ Pass, 
     NM, USA, 24" reflector), Cave , Gill (UK? 6" reflector x365), 
     "Eng. moon blink sys. detected red glows on c.p. & round it. 
     Independently seen by Cave. Not confirmed by Corralitos M.B." 
     NASA catalog ID#975, NASA weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2018-Sep-27 UT 17:32-21:26 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by Thomas on 1970-4-24 *

     Aristarchus 1970 Apr 24 UTC 07:00 
     Observed by Thomas


2018-Sep-27 UT 17:53-19:43 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by Scarfe on 1963-10-5

     In 1963 Oct 05/06 at UT 23:35-00:45 Scarfe (Cambridge, UK, 36" 
     reflector, transparency: hazy - high cirrus) observed very strong 
     luminescence at 50% of the total light (recorded photo-electrically) at 
     Hydrogen alpha (656nm), Sodium-D (589nm) and Fe(RMT 15) 539.71nm, 
     542.97nm, 543.45nm, 544.69nm, 550.15nm, and 550.68nm. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID= and weight=5. The effect was especially strong in 
     Aristarchus at 545.0nm. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=776 and weight=5. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=5.


2018-Sep-27 UT 17:53-19:43 Ill=93% Copernicus observed by Scarfe on 1963-10-5

     In 1963 Oct 05/06 at UT 23:35-00:45 Scarfe (Cambridge, UK, 36" 
     reflector, transparency: hazy - high cirrus) observed very strong 
     luminescence in Copernicus at 50% of the total light (recorded photo-
     electrically) at Hydrogen alpha (656nm), Sodium-D (589nm) and Fe(RMT 
     15) 539.71nm, 542.97nm, 543.45nm, 544.69nm, 550.15nm, and 550.68nm. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and weight=5. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=776 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2018-Sep-27 UT 17:53-19:43 Ill=93% Kepler observed by Scarfe on 1963-10-5

     In 1963 Oct 05/06 at UT 23:35-00:45 Scarfe (Cambridge, UK, 36" 
     reflector, transparency: hazy - high cirrus) observed very strong 
     luminescence in Kepler at 50% of the total light (recorded photo-
     electrically) at Hydrogen alpha (656nm), Sodium-D (589nm) and Fe(RMT 
     15) 539.71nm, 542.97nm, 543.45nm, 544.69nm, 550.15nm, and 550.68nm. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and weight=5. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=776 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-27 UT 19:12-21:04 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Kozyrev on 1961-11-25

     Aristarchus 1961 Nov 27 UTC 23:30 Observed by Kozyrev (Crimea, Soviet 
     Union) described in NASA catalog as: "Emission lines in spectrum of 
     c.p. in red & blue, H2 identified, (he had obtained C2 & Swan bands in 
     Alphonsus in '58 & '59" 50" reflector used. NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog TLP ID No. #755.


2018-Sep-27 UT 19:26-20:52 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Brook_C on 2009-6-11

     On 2009 Jun 11 at UT01:00-01:15 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, 2" refractor, 
     x25, seeing excellent and no cloud or haze) obsrved fluctuations in the 
     brightness of Aristarchus crater. No brightness fluctuations were seen 
     elsewhere. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-27 UT 23:21-00:12 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Gennatt on 1964-8-26

     Aristarchus 1964 Aug 26 UT 02:00-03:00 Observed by Genatt, Reid,
     (Greenbelt, MD, 16" reflector, x360, S=P-G), and Lindenblad 
     (Washington, DC, USA, 26" refractor) "Red and Blue bands. Grew 
     thinner & shorter. Alerted Naval Obs. One obs. tho't he saw 
     Phenom. but not sure. (confirmation ?). (prof. astronomers, but 
     not lunar observers)" NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA 
     catalog ID #844. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-27 UT 23:58-00:12 Ill=91% Unknown observed by Unknown_Observer on 1957-2-18

     In 1957 Feb 10 at UT 22:00 an unnamed observer repirted a TLP somewhere 
     on the Moon. The reference for this comes from: Palm, A. 1967, Icarus,&
     (2), p188-192. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=662 and weight=0. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-28 UT 16:33-19:30 Ill=86% Plato observed by Marshall_KP on 1982-9-7 *

     Plato 1982 Sep 07 UT 0330-0430. K.P. Marshall (Columbia, 12" 
     reflector, seeing III) saw no craterlets on the floor of Plato, 
     but what he considered unusual was an extremely bright short 
     section of the north rim of Plato - far brighter than, any other 
     part of the rim, and only slightly less bright than Mons Piton. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-28 UT 16:39-19:21 Ill=86% Aristarchus observed by Sekiguchi on 1970-3-26 *

     Near Aristarchus 1970 Mar 26 UT 17:00 Observed by Sekiguchi, 
     Maisumoto (Tokyo, Japan, 36" reflector) "Pts. N & S of crater 
     were brighter by 0.3 & 0.2 mag. respectively than normal -- 
     far beyond limits of error. Color index (CI) also showed less 
     depend. on phase by 0.1-0.2 mag. Did not show reddening dur. 
     enhancement. Polariz. was less by 1-2%. Photog. photom. 
     showed brightening over whole moon. Resolution = 2,3 km" NASA 
     catalog weight=5 and catalog ID #1236. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-28 UT 16:39-19:21 Ill=86% Kepler observed by Sekiguchi on 1970-3-26 *

     North of Kepler 1970 Mar 26 UT 17:00 Observed by Sekiguchi, Maisumoto 
     (Tokyo, Japan, 36" reflector) "Photog. photom. showed brightening over 
     whole moon. CI N. of Kepler enhanced by 0.5 mag. Resolution = 2,3 km" 
     NASA catalog weight=5 (Very high). NASA catalog ID #1236.


2018-Sep-28 UT 17:30-19:25 Ill=86% Plinius observed by Thury on 1889-9-13

     Plinius 1889 Sep 13 UTC 23:00? Observed by Thury (Geneva, 
     Switzerland) NASA Catalog Event #265, NASA Weight=3 (Average) 
     Event described as: "Unusual black spot with intensely white 4" 
     border over CP. Normal aspect is 2 craters. #260 says that 
     Gaudibert saw same thing in Sep. - confirmed". References: 
     Nature 41, 183, 1890 (April). The ALPO/BAA weight=1, this is 
     probably perfectly normal.


2018-Sep-28 UT 18:07-21:57 Ill=86% Plato observed by Lihou on 1886-10-16 *

     1886 Oct 16 UTC 22:00 Observed by Lihou (France?) "Unusual phenomena ? 
     (drawing)" Ref Sirius, Vol 20, 45 p69 (1887). NASA catalog weight=1 
     (very low). NASA catalog ID #252. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-28 UT 18:17-20:03 Ill=86% Plato observed by Markov on 1915-4-3

     Plato 1915 Apr 03 UTC 23:00? Observed by Markov (Russia) NASA 
     catalog describes observation: "Appearance of bright spots 
     that could even be seen in a 43mm (2-in) tube" 2" refractor 
     used. NASA catalog weight=2. NASA catalog TLP ID NO. #350. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-28 UT 20:46-22:38 Ill=85% Plato observed by Foley_PW on 1975-3-2

     On 1975 Mar 02 at UT05:00-06:18 P.W.Foley (Wilmington, Dartford, 
     Kent, UK, 12" reflector) observed blueness along the southern 
     wall of Plato. This is a BAA observation. Note that it
     is assumed that this is the same as Cameron's catalog 1975 
     Mar 02 UT 01:00 or 23:00 report by an Unknown English Observer 
     who  apparently observed colour in Plato (Red or violet). The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1402 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2018-Sep-29 UT 16:35-16:46 Ill=78% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1978-11-20

     Aristarchus 1978 Nov 20 UTC 03:00-05:00 Observed by Foley (Kent, UK, no 
     spurious colour, Seeing Antoniadi II and transparency good.) - 
     colouration seen: very bright violet spot on the north west interior. 
     No brightness variations seen. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=44 and 
     weight=. The ALPO/BAA weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-29 UT 16:55-18:44 Ill=78% Unknown observed by Von_Speisssen on 1888-11-23

     On 1888 Nov 23 at 16:15-17:00 UT Von Speissen & others of Berlin, 
     Germany, using a 3.5" refractor (x180), saw a "Triangular patch of 
     light (time in Middlehurst catalog wrong? Moonrise was at > 18:30h. If 
     year =1887, age=8.8 days & time OK. must be same observation as ID=256 
     in Cameron 1978 catalog - note similarity of names and also the 
     reference date). Cameron 1978 catalog ID=258 and weight=1.


2018-Sep-29 UT 19:07-21:04 Ill=77% Posidonius observed by Muller on 1890-10-3

     On 1890 Oct 03 at UT 22:00 Muller of Germany saw in Posidonius an 
     unusual shadow (Moon low? and crater in dark part-terminator 2 deg past 
     west wall - according to Cameron). Cameron 1978 catalog ID=267 and 
     weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-29 UT 20:05-20:49 Ill=77% Copernicus observed by Firsoff on 1955-5-12

     Copernicus 1955 May 12 UTC 03:40 Observed by Firsoff (Somerset, UK, 
     6.5" reflector x70) "Pico was invis. in violet filter. Copernicus was 
     bright in it." NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID #591.


2018-Sep-29 UT 20:05-20:49 Ill=77% Mons_Pico observed by Firsoff on 1955-5-12

     Mt Pico 1955 May 12 UTC 03:40 Observed by Firsoff (Somerset, UK, 
     6.5" reflector x70) "Pico was invis. in violet filter. Copernicus 
     was bright in it." NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID #591. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-29 UT 20:05-22:02 Ill=77% Agrippa observed by Bartlett on 1966-9-5

     Agrippa 1966 Sep 05 UTC 04:47-05:00 Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, 
     MD, USA, 5" reflector, 283x) "Within the wall shadow, the landslip was 
     faintly illum., est. at 4, & distinctly brownish". S=6-1, T=3-1. NASA 
     catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #975.


2018-Sep-29 UT 21:00-22:56 Ill=77% Mare_Tranquillitatis observed by Arkhipov on 1985-9-4

     On 1985 Sep 04 at UT 22:15 A.V. Arkhipov (Russia) detected a bright 
     flash in Mare Tranquilitatis that lasted < 1 second and had a diameter 
     of < 2 arc seconds i.e. the limit of seeing resolution. The Cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=280 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-29 UT 21:04-22:58 Ill=77% Aristarchus observed by Kozyrev on 1961-11-27

     Aristarchus 1961 Nov 27 UTC 23:30 Observed by Kozyrev (Crimea, Soviet 
     Union) described in NASA catalog as: "Emission lines in spectrum of 
     c.p. in red & blue, H2 identified, (he had obtained C2 & Swan bands in 
     Alphonsus in '58 & '59" 50" reflector used. NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog TLP ID No. #755.


2018-Sep-30 UT 18:38-20:24 Ill=68% Alphonsus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1958-12-2

     On 1958 Dec 02 at UT 06:00 an unknown observer detected a TLP on the 
     Moon. The reference for this is from Palm, 1967 Icarus. The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=709 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2018-Sep-30 UT 19:27-21:21 Ill=67% Plato observed by Foley_PW on 1975-3-4

     On 1975 Mar 04 at UT03:46-06:01 P.W.Foley (Wilmington, Dartford, 
     Kent, UK, 12" reflector) observed bluesness along the southern 
     wall of Plato.  This is a BAA observation. The Cameron 1978 
     catalogue ID is #1403 and has a weight of 1. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2018-Sep-30 UT 19:42-21:36 Ill=67% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1975-3-4

     On 1975 Mar 04 UT 04:01-05:30 P.W. Foley (Wilmington, Dartford, Kent, 
     UK, 12" reflector, seeing excellent, no turbulence, slight frost and 
     mist) had a suspicion of blue on the entire north wall of Aristarchus 
     crater - not seen visually but detected with a Moon Blink device. 
     Crater extremely bright and unable to penetrate it visually. 
     Surrounding areas charp. No red/orange on south wall. All other areas 
     proved negative. Photographs taken. No change in appearance over this 
     time. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2018-Sep-30 UT 20:09-21:33 Ill=67% Cassini observed by McLarin on 1965-10-16

     1965 Oct 16 UTC 08:05-10:00 Observed by McLarin (Huntsville, AL, 20" 
     reflector), Bates, Hall (Prt. Tobacco, MD, 16" reflector), Hardie 
     (Nashville, TE, 30" reflector) "Color flashing pulsations 
     intermittently detected by Trident MB device in Huntsville but not seen 
     in Md, or vis. by Hardie when alerted. Pulsations in Cassini different 
     from atmosphere" NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #906.


2018-Sep-30 UT 22:18-23:59 Ill=66% Montes_Spitzbergen observed by Madej_P on 1980-10-30

     On 1980 Oct 30 at UT03:19-03:41 P. Madej (Huddersfield, UK, 158mm f/4 
     reflector, seeing I-II, and transparency very good. Wratten 15 (yellow) 
     and Wratten 35 (purple) used. No spurious colour seen). At 03:19UT, the 
     observer noted that Mons Spitzbergen looked sharper at x52. At x72 
     bright flashes of a bright lunar gray to a light orange colour seen. 
     BAA Lunar Section TLP team alerted. At 03:32UT a yellow filter used and 
     the flashes were better seen, one flash approximately 20-30 sec apart. 
     At 03:31UT Madej used a purple filter and could not see Mons 
     Spitzbergen but did see the flashes (45-60 sec apart). cameron 2006 
     catalog TLP ID=118 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2018-Sep-30 UT 23:59-00:00 Ill=66% Plato observed by Butler_FC on 1980-10-30

     Plato 1980 Oct 30 UT 05:00-0704 Observed by F.C. Butler (SW 
     London, UK, seeing III, but worsening (but not as bad as IV) 
     towards the end of the observing period, transparency 100% 
     clear, 22cm Newtonian reflector, x144, x185). The floor seemed 
     quite devoid of detail, apart from a vague mottling seen during 
     the briefest moments of best seeing conditions. At the start of 
     the observing period he could just glimpse the central craterlet 
     at x185, but could not be sure. ALPO/BAA weight=1.