TLP Repeat Illumination/Libration and Earthshine predictions for: Uruguay - Montevideo



Ill is percentage illumination of the Moon
*Indicates a repeat illumination and libration event to within +/- 1 deg for both
A non-* indicates just repeat illumination to within +/-0.5 deg


2020-Jan-01 UT 00:00-01:09 Ill=30% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-01 UT 22:57-01:14 Ill=38% Julius_Caesar observed by Colesanti_C on 1993-6-25 *

     On 25 Jun 1993 at UT 23:30-23:52 Carlos Colesanti (Mairinque, 
     Brazil) obtained two CCD images of Julius Caesar crater and 
     noticed a brilliant fuzzy area on the rim of the crater. This 
     appeared in both images and resembled a fuzzy white blob. Note 
     that this is a REA-Brazil observation. ALPO/BAA weight=1. 
     Cameron (2006) ID=463.


2020-Jan-01 UT 23:30-01:13 Ill=38% Aristarchus observed by Price_M on 1981-2-10

     On 1981 Feb 10 at UT21:46-21:49 P. Madej (Huddersfield, UK) found a 2nd 
     mag star-like point on the north east wall of Aristarchus crater. M. 
     Price (Camberley, UK) at 21:46 and 21:49. North (UK) detected flashes 
     from the central peak. Foley saw Aristarchus as a "translucent glow". 
     Moore, Pedler and Ratcliff could not find Aristarchus. Earlier though 
     Amery (Reading, UK) had found Aristarchus to be sharply defined. 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=122 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-01 UT 23:56-01:05 Ill=39% Ross_D observed by Arriola on 1967-10-10

     SE of Ross D 1967 Oct 10 UT 02:25-03:10 Observers: Harris 
     (Tucson, AZ?) Corralitos Obs (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector) 
     "Bright area moved 80km/hr towards SSE & expanded as contrast 
     reduced. Corralitos MB did not confirm" NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #1049. Reports in ALPO/BAA archive 
     mention observations from Edmund Arriola & Robert Moody, Jr. 
     02:40-03:10 (19" Whittier College, x170 & x400, T=4, S=2-3) & 
     Cross 02:25-02:38 (12" f/66 Cass, x400, T=6, S=1.5 to 1") - the 
     latter although seeing low visual activity, apparently according 
     to Harris, took some yellow light photos that showed high 
     activity? ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-01 UT 23:31-01:38 Ill=39% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-02 UT 23:04-00:59 Ill=48% Promontorium_Agassiz observed by Holden on 1888-7-16

     On 1888 Jul 16 at UT 05:35? Holden, at Lick observatory, CA, USA 
     saw a "Lunar Volcano, 1st magnitude star on the dark side. 
     Yellow light tinged with red from refractor's secondary spectrum 
     (facet glint? or peak catching sun before others? Hunt saw 
     similar phenomenon in 1863." Corliss states that it was later 
     revealed to be a mountain ridge near the southern termination of 
     the Alpes. Cameron 1978 catalog ID=357 and weight=1. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-02 UT 23:31-02:03 Ill=49% Earthshine: Quadrantids: ZHR=120 (vel=41km/s

2020-Jan-03 UT 22:57-23:15 Ill=57% Aristarchus observed by Emmett on 1824-7-4

     In 1824 Jul 04 at UT23:00? Emmett (England, UK) observed a star-like 
     light on the rim (in the dark). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=100 and the 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-03 UT 22:57-23:08 Ill=57% Plato observed by Markov on 1916-7-8

     Plato 1916 Jul 8 UT 19:00? Observed by Markov (Russia) "Light on the 
     shadow of the bands at the bottom (similar to #362)" NASA catalog 
     weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #364. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-03 UT 22:57-23:02 Ill=57% Plato observed by Kelsey on 1967-4-18

     Plato 1967 Apr 18 UT 03:10-04:00 Observed by Kelsey 
     (Riverside, CA, USA, 8" reflector x300, S=8, T-4-5). "Streak 
     on floor showed slight enhancement in red filter comp. to 
     blue. Later, a 2nd streak formed. Probably the sun shining 
     thru a valley in the rim. Red enhancement permanent? (Wise 
     suspected a blink here 6h earlier)." NASA catalog weight=3. 
     NASA catalog ID #1027. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-03 UT 22:57-00:45 Ill=57% Alphonsus observed by Cook_AC on 1990-2-3

     Alphonsus 1990 Feb 03 UT 18:00-18:23 Observed by A.C. Cook 
     (Frimley, UK, CCD video camera, seeing III-IV). At 18:06 W and 
     SE dark floor patches, equally dark, but at 18:10 and 18:23 the 
     W dark patch was the darker of the two?. Between 18:06 and 18:23 
     and a bright patch to the north of the central peak brightned 
     slightly wrt the its surroundings. However seeing conditions 
     worsened as the observing session progressed, and in view of 
     this the ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-03 UT 23:20-01:11 Ill=57% Plato observed by Fauth on 1907-1-22

     Plato 1907 Jan 22 UT 20:00 Observed by Fauth (Germany?) "Glow of light 
     in part of crater" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog 
     ID 327.


2020-Jan-04 UT 00:17-02:04 Ill=58% Tycho observed by Shaw_B on 2003-5-9

     Tycho 2003 May 09 UT 21:04 Observer Brendan Shaw (UK) "CCD 
     image of  central peak - Sun's altitude suggested that this 
     should not have been directly illuminated this early - may 
     have been from secandary reflectance off illuminated W wall?" 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-04 UT 00:43-02:28 Ill=58% Alphonsus observed by Brook_C on 1990-2-3

     Alphonsus 1990 Feb 03 UTC 20:05-21:22 Observed by Brook (Plymouth, UK, 
     10" reflector)  "Brightness variance noted". The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     does not have an entry for this observation. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-04 UT 01:20-02:28 Ill=58% Alphonsus observed by Smith_S on 1966-4-28

     Alphonsus 1966 Apr 28 UT 21:58 Observed by Smith (England, 10" 
     reflector) and Corralitos Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" 
     reflector+Moon Blink) "Reddish patches, (not confirmed at Corralitos 
     with MB tho they give feature as Gassendi in their report)." NASA 
     catalog weight=2. NASA catalog ID #930. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-03 UT 23:31-02:07 Ill=58% Earthshine: Quadrantids: ZHR=120 (vel=41km/s

2020-Jan-05 UT 00:12-01:42 Ill=67% Archimedes observed by Theiss on 1973-1-13

     Archimedes 1973 Jan 13 UTC 19:06-19:40 Observed by Theiss (51N, 9.67E, 
     75mm refractor) "Yellow to green colours at wall of Archimedes, became 
     stronger until 19:09UT, constant brightness until 19:10UT and 
     dissappeared at 19:16UT" Ref: Hilbrecht & Kuveler (1984) Moon & Planets 
     30, pp53-61.


2020-Jan-05 UT 00:36-02:06 Ill=67% Proclus observed by Krojer on 1973-1-13

     Proclus 1973 Jan 13 UTC 19:30-19:35 Observed by Krojer (48.25N, 11.5E, 
     60mm refractor) "North East wall of Proclus extraordinarilly bright, 
     observation interrupted by fog." Ref: Hilbrecht & Kuveler (1984) Moon & 
     Planets 30, pp53-61.


2020-Jan-05 UT 01:08-02:38 Ill=67% Censorinus observed by Leitzinger on 1973-1-13

     Censorinus 1973 Jan 13 UTC 20:02-20:14 Observed by Leitzinger (48.25N, 
     11.5E, 60mm refractor) "Censorinus Extraordinarily bright, pure white" 
     Ref: Hilbrecht & Kuveler (1984) Moon & Planets 30, pp53-61.


2020-Jan-05 UT 01:49-02:53 Ill=68% Alphonsus observed by Smith_S on 1966-4-29

     Alphonsus 1966 Apr 20 UT 22:28 Observed by Smith (Nottingham, 
     England, 10" reflector) Reddish patch possibly detected on SE 
     flank of central peaks, but more dubious than that from 28th 
     Apr. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-05 UT 01:56-02:53 Ill=68% Proclus observed by Schnuchel on 1973-1-13

     Proclus 1973 Jan 13 UTC 20:50 Observed by Schnuchel (13.25E, 52.5N, 
     7x50 binoculars?) "Proclus Brighter than Langrenus". Ref: Hilbrecht & 
     Kuveler Moon & Planets (1984) Vol 30, pp53-61.


2020-Jan-05 UT 02:39-02:40 Ill=68% Mons_Pico observed by Mobberley_M on 1987-3-9

     On 1987 Mar 09 at UT20:00 M. Mobberley (Sussex, UK) obtained some video 
     of Mons Pico - apparently these show the mountain with a puzzling 
     appearance (not sure whether it was the observer who claimed this or 
     some one who analyzed the tape). The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=300 and 
     the weight=5. ALPO/BAA=1. 


2020-Jan-05 UT 22:58-23:13 Ill=76% Unknown observed by Scarfe on 1964-1-24

     On 1964 Jan 24 at 20:00? Scarfe (UK) obtained spactra showing 
     luminescence? The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=796 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-05 UT 22:58-23:22 Ill=76% Plato observed by Beaumont_S on 1998-3-8

     Plato 1998 Mar 08 UT 19:30-20:10 S. Beaumont (Windermere, UK, 
     30cm reflector, Meade 23A and 38A filters, seeing III, 
     transparency fairly good, some haze) observed a whitish misty 
     effect seen bordering the shadows of the SE rim. It appeared 
     intermittently and was not seen in the violet or red filters. 
     Observers wonders if it could have been an effect associated 
     with the Earth's atmosphere, which was unsteady with some haze. 
     However, other craters appeared normal. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-06 UT 00:51-02:30 Ill=76% Gassendi observed by Sartory on 1966-4-30

     Gassendi 1966 Apr 30 UT 21:30-23:28 Observed by Sartory, 
     Ringsdore (England, 8.5" reflector, S=E), Moore, Moseley 
     (Armagh, Northern Ireland, 10" refractor, S=VG), Coralitos 
     Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector, Moon Blink) 
     "English moon blink system detected red spots with vis. 
     confirm. Ringsdore says no color but saw obscuration. (LRL 
     60-in photos showed nothing unusual by my casual inspection). 
     Indep. confirm. (even E. wall was in dark). Corralitos did 
     not confirm by MB." N.B. event had finished by the time 
     Corralitos came on-line. NASA catalog weight=5. NASA catalog 
     ID #931. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-06 UT 02:01-04:01 Ill=76% Sinus_Iridum observed by Brook_C on 1996-4-28 *

     Sinus Iridum 1996 Apr 28 UT 20:00 Observed by Brook (Plymouth, 
     UK, 60mm refractor, x112, seeing III, slight breeze, twilight) 
     "dark shaded area on floor ~1/4 diameter of Sinus Iridum on 
     western interior by rim" BAA Lunar Section Observation. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-06 UT 22:58-00:39 Ill=84% Gassendi observed by Sartory on 1966-5-1

     Gassendi 1966 May 01 UT 19:30-00:21 Observed by Sartory (UK, 
     8.5" reflector, x500, S=G), Moore, Moseley (Northern Ireland, 
     12.5" reflector x350, S=E) and by Corralitos Observatory 
     (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector + moon blink) "Eng. 
     moonblink & obscuration, also vis. confirm (Moore & Moseley 
     alerted by Sartory. Corralitos MB did not confirm. - but they 
     may not have been observing at the ame time?)." NASA catalog 
     weight=5. NASA catalog ID #932. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-06 UT 22:58-23:23 Ill=84% Gassendi observed by Robinson_JH on 1976-10-4

     Gassendi 1976 Oct 04 UT 20:55-20:58 Observed by Robinson (Devon, 
     England) - observer noted that the east outside wall was bright in red 
     and normal in blue. Note that the Moon was 30 deg above the horizon at 
     the time of the observation. The crater returned to normal at 20:58. 
     Also seen by Moore (Selsey, UK) and Foley (Kent, UK). At 21:25-21:50 D. 
     Sims (Dawlish, UK, 25cm reflector, x300, seeing IV and some cloud at 
     times) noticed a possible obscuration over the southern part of 
     Gassendi. He had been observing earlier at 18:40-19:30 but had not 
     detected a TLP in Gassendi then. 22:11UT Robinson notices that the spot 
     outside the east wall is again bright in red., though by 22:25 it had 
     faded  and was gone by 22:28UT. The Cameron 1978 catalog further 
     quotes: "Vivid red spots & general red color seen around rim by 2 obs. 
     At 2209h blood red small area was seen. 1 h later the most westerly 
     (IAU?) of the peaks had become hazy white all other areas were sharp. 
     (Indep. confirm.)." Cameron 1978 catalog weight=5 and catalog ID #1454. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-06 UT 22:58-22:59 Ill=84% Gassendi observed by Unknown_English_Observer on 1977-4-29

     On 1977 Apr 29 at UT21:40-23:20 an unknown UK observer reported a TLP 
     in Gassendi crater. The following are reports by observers attempting 
     to confirm activity: J.W. Napper (Didcot, UK, 30cm reflector, x287, 
     Wratten 25 and 44a, conditions clear 5+) received a telephone alert 
     call at 22:00 but the sky was cloudy until 22:30. An initial look 
     revealed nothing unusual, then at 22:54 he observed a colour blink just 
     inside the north wall, appearing bright in red and normal in blue or 
     white light. No loss of detail seen and the effect lasted only 2 
     minutes. A sketch was made. However the observer stresses that the very 
     bad seeing casts some doubt on this observation. L. Fitton observed 
     using a 8.5" reflector, with Moon blink device at x200, seeing was I-
     II. All areas negative, including Gassindi from 21:40-21:55 and again 
     22;00-22:25 and finally 22:50-23:30 negative. Mike Brown (Huntington, 
     York, UK, 30cm reflector, x220 and x350, seeing 3-4/5, and transparency 
     5/5) - observed from 22:00-23:25UT no colour seen, nor obsecuration, 
     all filters negative, despite seeing a lot of fine setail inside this 
     crater.


2020-Jan-06 UT 22:58-00:09 Ill=84% Proclus observed by Darling_D on 1987-10-4

     On 1987 Oct 04 at UT 02:20 D. Darling (sun Praire, WI, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x170, S=8, VG, T=5) obtained the brightest measurement he 
     had ever recorded on the northern rim of Proclus. Brightness 9 and 
     adjacent plain was of brightness 6.5. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=308 
     and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3. 


2020-Jan-07 UT 00:54-02:24 Ill=84% Plato observed by Graham_F on 1980-7-24

     On 1980 Jul 24 at UT02:00 F. Graham (East Pittsburgh, PA, USA, 6" 
     reflector) took some photos (albeit out of focus) that showed a bright 
     spot on the west rim. Cameron comments that this spot was sharp 
     compared to the rest of the photograph, so was probably a photographic 
     artifact. The effect was not seen in the finder scope. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=103 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-07 UT 01:18-03:05 Ill=84% Aristarchus observed by Paterson on 1966-5-1

     Aristarchus 1966 May 01 UT 21:55-22:45 Observed by Paterson, 
     Brown, Sartory, Ringsdore (England, 12" reflector x252 for the 
     former and 8.5"? reflector for the latter) "Eng. moon blink 
     system detected red spots with vis. by all but Ringsdore. Brown 
     saw intense white spot NW of crater wall" NASA catalog weight=5. 
     NASA catalog ID 933. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-07 UT 02:10-05:17 Ill=85% Aristarchus observed by Darling_D on 1989-9-12 *

     On 1989 Sep 12 at UT00:58-02:25 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x159, S=7/10) observed similar light conditions to 1989 Jul 
     15. At 02:00 he observed pink on the south west wall of Aristarchus 
     crater. At 01:24UT the Aristarchus ray was yellowish, however the 
     entire Moon had a grey-yellow tinge of colour. Chromatic aberation was 
     observed at 01:56UT. By comparison Gassendi was checked and had no 
     colour. At 02:10 the crater wall of Aristarchus was unusual and was 
     quite different in appearance to rims of other craters. The cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=375 and the weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2020-Jan-07 UT 22:58-23:35 Ill=91% Mare_Serenitatis observed by van_Son_M on 2004-5-2

     On 2004 May 02 at UT03:24 M. and L. van Son (Bremerton, WA, May 1st 
     7:24PM PST) saw a naked eye flash on the Moon. The observers were 
     glancing up at the Moon in daylight when they saw a bright white flash 
     (observer and his wife together) in the upper/mid Mare Serenitatis 
     region, west of the crater Posidonius. "Larger than how Venus appears".
     "It was a quick flash  like white, intense lightning. I'm not sure how 
     to report degrees of arc but if the face we see is 900, and we start 
     from the east then the flash occurred about 225 arc seconds to the 
     west. This was observed by the naked eye, with clear skies between us 
     and the moon." The observers checked for signs of aircraft vapour 
     trails but could not see any. There is a possibility that it could have 
     been sun glint from an Iridium satellite, but this needs to be checked 
     out and usually these last longer than the observed effect. It would be 
     useful to obtain whole Moon images under the same illunination and 
     libration so that we can judge this observation properly. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=4. 


2020-Jan-07 UT 23:26-00:25 Ill=91% Herodotus observed by Porta on 1965-6-11

     Herodotus 1965 Jun 11 UTC 21:35-21:40 Observed by Porta, Garau 
     (Mallorca, Baleares, 4" refractor x250) "Red glow in crater at 2140, 
     then clouds stopped obs. After clouds, floor was abnormal rose color" 
     NASA catalog weight=5. NASA catalog ID #879.
     ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-07 UT 23:31-01:24 Ill=91% Aristarchus observed by Sartory on 1966-5-2

     Cobra Head 1966 May 02 UT 20:05 Observed by Sartory (England, 8.5" 
     reflector x400) "Eng. moon blink detected red spots, seen visually 
     also". NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #934.


2020-Jan-07 UT 23:40-01:33 Ill=91% Gassendi observed by Sartory on 1966-5-2

     Gassendi 1966 May 02 UT 20:18-20:19 Observed by Sartory (England, 8.5" 
     reflector x400) "Eng. moon blink detected red spots, seen visually 
     also." NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID #935.


2020-Jan-08 UT 00:28-01:38 Ill=91% Aristarchus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1978-3-21

     On 1978 Mar 21 at UT 20:57 an Unknown observer observed a TLP in 
     Aristarchus crater. The details for this report are still being looked 
     up in the archives. In view of the uncertain details this TLP has been 
     given an ALPO/BAA weight of 1.


2020-Jan-08 UT 00:47-02:37 Ill=91% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1982-7-3

     Aristarchus 1982 Jul 03/04 UTC 20:55-01:08 Observed by Foley (Kent, UK, 
     Seeing Antoniadi III) "Brightness variance" - CED 3.6-4.1-4.9. When the 
     crater was dark it had a slate-blue-grey interior. Moore found the 
     crater to be exceptionally bright and this was confirmed by J.D. Cook 
     (CED 3.8-4.1). The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=174 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-08 UT 00:52-02:42 Ill=91% Mare_Frigoris observed by Cook_JD on 1982-7-3

     On 1982 Jul 03/04 at UT 20:45-01:08 J.D. Cook (Frimley, 
     Surrey, UK) found the Mare Frogoris area, north of Plato was 
     pink at 20:45UT. Saxton found flashes in Mare Frigoris and 
     near thye Alps. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=174 and the 
     weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-08 UT 00:52-02:42 Ill=91% Plato observed by Foley_PW on 1982-7-3

     Interior craterlets could not be seen and some of the walls and 
     exterior features were fuzzy. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-08 UT 01:05-03:03 Ill=91% Aristarchus observed by Osawa on 1951-9-13

     S. of Aristarchus 1951 Sep 13 UTC 14:00? Observed by Osawa (Japan, 6" 
     reflector) "Bownish-red color, blue on NW rim of A." NASA catalog 
     weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #546.


2020-Jan-08 UT 01:53-02:49 Ill=91% Herodotus observed by Porta on 1965-6-12

     On 1965 Jun 12 at UT > 00:00 an unknown observer (Porta?) reported that 
     the area of Herodotus and the Cobra Head expanded and the colour went 
     to rose. The next night the floor was normal. In filters, phenomenon 
     accentuated in orange. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=880 and weight=3. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-08 UT 04:43-05:57 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Azeau on 1971-9-2 *

     Aristarchus-Herodotus 1971 Sep 02 UTC 20:00 Observed by Ayeau 
     (Paris, France, 12" reflector, x100) "Brownish-red or maroon 
     seen on Aris. W.wall ridge to Herod. on S.wall of Herodotus" 
     NASA catalog weight=2. NASA catalog ID #1311. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-08 UT 23:25-00:49 Ill=96% Eratosthenes observed by Bartlett on 1954-7-14

     Eratothenes 1954 Jul 14 UT 04:18-05:00 Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, 
     MD, USA, 5" reflector, x150, S=4, T=3) "Violet glare on E. wall bright 
     spot (EWBS)" NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID #565. ALPO
     /BAA catalog weight=3.


2020-Jan-08 UT 23:25-00:15 Ill=96% Unknown observed by Scarfe on 1964-1-27

     On 1964 Jan 27 at 21:00? Scarfe (UK) obtained spactra showing 
     luminescence? The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=797 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-08 UT 23:25-00:29 Ill=96% Schiaparelli observed by Brierley_P on 2009-1-9

     On 2009 Jan 09 at UT 20:00 P. Brierley (UK) took a CCD image of the 
     Aristarchus area - P.Grego upon examining this comments that he thinks 
     that Schiaparelli crater looked "muted in brightness -- it is normally 
     quite bright to look at". Though Grego comments that it might have 
     something to do with the image processing aplied to the image. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-09 UT 01:00-02:56 Ill=96% Alphonsus observed by Smith_S on 1966-5-3

     Alphonsus 1966 May 03 UTC 21:30 Observed by Smith (England, 10" 
     reflector) and Corralitos Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" 
     reflector, Moonblink) "Reddish patches. Not confirmed by Corralitos MB 
     (but in their report they give the feature as Gassendi)." NASA catalog 
     weight=2. NASA catalog ID #936. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-09 UT 02:52-04:32 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Mobberley_M on 1987-3-13

     On 1987 Mar 13 at UT 20:52 M. Mobberley (Suffolk, UK, S=VG) obtained 
     some video that shows variation in Aristarchus crater e.g.  visual 
     oddity in the SE corner" (Foley was interpreting the video). H.Hatfield 
     took some film of the TLP (Unstudied yet). The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=
     301 and the weight=5.


2020-Jan-09 UT 02:52-04:32 Ill=96% Mons_Pico observed by Mobberley_M on 1987-3-13

     On 1987 Mar 13 at UT 20:52 M. Mobberley (Sussex, UK) found that Mons 
     Pico varied in its north east section. This was recorded on video tape. 
     The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=301 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-09 UT 04:20-05:04 Ill=97% Godin observed by Porter on 1973-7-14

     Godin UT 02:15-03:05 Observed by Porter (Narragansett, Rhode Island, 
     USA, 6" refletor, 45, 90x, S=P?, T=2) "Albedo change in some pts. 
     yellow-orange color on rim. Wondered if it were atmos. LTP albedo=
     7,7,7,6.5. Normal albedos=7,7.5,6.5,6.5 for same pts. Nearby plain 
     albedos =6. LTP from 0250-0300h. Intensity normal at first;pts in W. 
     decreased & N.pt increased. No difference in intensity in red filter 
     till suddenly it jumped out & became vis. above the high background 
     albedo. Sketch. He thinks it was atm. seeing" NASA catalog weight=2 
     (low). NASA catalog ID #1370.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:30-01:21 Ill=99% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Zlatinsky on 1903-4-11

     On 1903 Apr 11 at UT 23:44 Zlatinsky (Russia) observed the following 
     for Tycho? or Aristarchus?: "Dur. a lunar eclipse a bright extension of 
     lunar (rays?) in shadow for 30m until mid-ecl." was seen. W.W. Magness 
     (England, UK, 3" refractor) also saw two bright streaks of light, 
     either side of the uneclipsed crsecent of the Moon. The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=217 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:30-01:31 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Ward on 1906-8-4

     On 1906 Aug 04 at UT 12:30-13:30 Ward (England?) observed during a 
     lunar eclipse Aristarchus to shine conspicuously. Cameron says that UT 
     time is on the new system (as opposed to local time) with the mid 
     eclipse at 13:00UT. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=325 and the weight=1. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:30-02:08 Ill=99% Tycho observed by LeRoy on 1912-4-1

     On 1910 Apr 01 at UT 22:00-23:00 LeRoy (France?) during an eclipse, 
     observed Tycho to be visible as a very bright spot standing out in the 
     slate grey shadow. Apparently only Tycho was seen during the elipse. 
     The mid eclipse point was at 22:14UT. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=236 
     and the weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:30-01:53 Ill=99% Herodotus observed by Chernov on 1924-8-14

     1924 Aug 14 UT 20:00 Herodotus observed by Chernov (Russia, 2" 
     refractor?). Weak luminescence seen in mid lunar eclipe. 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=390 and weight=3. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:30-00:59 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Reid on 1950-9-26

     On 1950 Sep 26 at UT 02:52, 03:10 Reid (Montreal, Canada, 6" reflector 
     x48) and Venor (Montreal, Canada, 12" reflector) observed a 
     brightening, fading, and brightening in Aristarchus crater during 
     totality. There was a phosphorescent glow (date not given but times 
     match this eclipse). cameron suggests that this is a confirmation 
     report. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=538 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.  


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:30-01:32 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Olivarez_J on 1968-3-14

     Aristarchus 1968 Mar 14 UT 01:32-02:06 Observed by Olivarez, Maley, 
     Etheridge (Edinburgh, TX, USA, 17" reflector, x125 + Moon Blink) and 
     Corralitos Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector, Moon Blink)
     "S=5 (F-G) for the TX observations. "Trident Moon Blink on S. wall 
     creet & c.p. & white spots in crater. No color seen vis. Blink not seen 
     earlier or later. Other craters blinked some but not as strongly.
     Only Aris. areas blinked when Moon blink was moved around. Observers 
     consider blinks real. Alt. of moon was 50 deg. Drawings. Corralitos
     say they did not confirm, but they rep't Copernicus, not Aris." NASA 
     catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID #1062.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:30-00:40 Ill=99% Ross observed by Azeau on 1969-9-25

     On 1969 Sep 25 at 19:00?UT Azeau (Paris, France, 12" reflector, x100, 
     Seeing = good, altitude=20 deg) observed during an eclipse brilliant 
     points for 30 minutes in Ross. Cameron says that the date given 
     originally (16th Sep) was wrong because the age was 5 days and not full 
     Moon. There was however a peumbral eclipse on Sep 25th at 20:10 (max). 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1201 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:30-01:02 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Unknown_US_Observers on 1975-5-25

     On 1975 May 25 at UT 05:00-06:00 an unknown US observer took a 
     photograph of a lunar eclipse that shows Aristarchus gleaming white. 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1406 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:30-01:02 Ill=99% Romer observed by Unknown_US_Observers on 1975-5-25

     On 1975 May 25 at UT 05:00-06:00 an unknown US observer took a 
     photograph of a lunar eclipse that shows a bright spot on the east 
     (IAU?) rim of mare Serenitatis (Romer?). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=
     1406 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:30-01:18 Ill=99% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Varros_G on 2008-2-21

     eclipse an unconfirmed impact flash on the Moon. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:32-02:01 Ill=99% Unknown observed by Messier on 1783-9-10

     Moving glows seen around the middle of the
     disk during a lunar eclipse. It is possible
     that the TLP referred to might have been
     from the 1783 Mar 18 eclipse instead?


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:38-01:31 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Johnson_SJ on 1881-12-5

     On 1881 Dec 05 at UT 17:09 Johnson observed a dark lunar eclipse. 
     Aristarchus was seen as a white spot in the coppery disk and continued 
     so. Cameron comments that this is the normal apeparance in an eclipse? 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=226 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:38-02:24 Ill=99% Mare_Tranquillitatis observed by Searle_G on 1978-9-16

     On 1978 Sep 16 at UT 18:28-18:57 G.Searle (Concord, Sydney, NSW, 
     Australia, 8" reflector, x100, x160, S=III) observed a bright star-like 
     point on the western (IAU) edge of Mare Tranquilitatis (x100) that 
     appeared unlike any other crater and a check of the location revealed 
     no suitably bright crater in that region (from a map?). Changed to a 
     higher power (x160) and it was still there, but not as conspicuous. 
     Observer thinks that this may have been due to the Moon's low altitiude 
     (16 deg) and the seeing. At 18:35 he compared it to the brilliant 
     crater Proclus and found the star-like point to be 75% of the 
     brightness of Proclus. Ken Wallace (Australia) had been taking photos 
     and observed the object at 17:37.5UT. The object gradually faded over 
     the next 15 minutes and by 18:52UT could only be seen in averted vision 
     at x100. By 18:57UT it was gone. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=38 and 
     weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:51-01:49 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by Porta on 1954-1-19

     In 1954 Jan 19 at UT 03:00 Porta (Mallorca, Baleares, Spain, 3" 
     refractor, x50) observed the following during a total lunar eclipse: "3 
     brilliant yellowish-white spots between Picard & Peirce. Phosphor. 
     light distinguished easily against gray-green background of mare. 
     Irreg., intermittent. Did not perceive them all dur. totality. Next day 
     had impression that all of area was less clear & lightly veiled.". The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=561 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 00:59-02:40 Ill=99% Atlas observed by Haas_W on 1942-8-26

     On 1942 Aug 26 at UT 04:00 Haas (New Mexico?, USA, 12" 
     reflector?, very clear sky and good seeing) observed (during an 
     lunar eclipse) found an unmistakable lightening of a dark albedo 
     area in Atlas. This area returned to normal darkness during the 
     4 houres  after Atlas re-entered sunlight. Cameron says that the 
     mid eclipse was at 04:00. The Cameron 198 catalog ID=489 and 
     weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2020-Jan-10 UT 01:06-02:31 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Travnik on 1971-8-6

     Aristarchus 1971 Aug 06 UTC 03:45 Observed by Nelson Travnik 
     (Matias Barbosa, Minas, Brazil, 6" refractor) "Color photo 
     showing crater very bright comp. with all other features. 
     Says glare at Aris. (seen vis. ? Apollo 15 watch? Date typed 
     06-08-71. European format? if date = June 8, aux. data are 
     same except solar 3-.14+ & fates & times of Perigee, apogee, 
     & FM differ)." NASA catalog weight=5. NASA catalog ID #1304. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 01:22-02:19 Ill=99% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Dubois on 1954-1-19

     On 1954 Jan 18 at UT 23:30-03:30 Dubois (Floira, France) observed in 
     Oceanus_Procellarum and East Mare Fecunditatis, during a lunar eclpise 
     (mid eclipse at 03:00) a spectrographic excess luminescence: 1) waxing 
     totality max. sready near 445nm at 50' from centre of umbra; 2) waning 
     tolatity, 470-505nm, max near 490nm, 25% at 50' from centre of umbra. 
     Other observers noted a thin sliver of white on the edge of the Moon, 
     despite it being in totality. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=560 and 
     weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=5. 


2020-Jan-10 UT 01:40-03:26 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by McKim_R on 1978-9-16

     On 1978 Sep 16 at UT19:30 R. McKin (Colchester, Essex, UK, 216mm 
     reflector and binoculars) observed that Aristarchus, in the lighter 
     region, during the lunar eclipse, was duller than usual but no less 
     conspicuous than expected. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=38 and weight=5. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 02:49-03:45 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1964-5-26

     On 1964 May 26 UT 04:10-04:35 Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA, S=5, T=5). 
     observed that Aristarchus had a strong blue-violet glow on the east 
     wall and EWBS, with a strong violet tinge on the nimbus. Crater was 
     hazy, could not focus it in red, green or blue light. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID= and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 03:09-04:18 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Moore_P on 1982-1-9

     On 1982 Jan 09 at UT18:46-21:42 P. Moore, (Selsey, UK) and others found 
     that Aristarchus and Plato changed in brightness and colour during a 
     lunar eclipse. Aristarchus was especially bright during the lunar 
     eclipse. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=162 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 03:09-04:18 Ill=99% Censorinus observed by Moore_P on 1982-1-9

     On 1982 Jan 09 at UT 18:46-21:42 P. Moore (Selsey, UK) and other 
     observers noted Censorinus was exceptionally bright. Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=162 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=2.  


2020-Jan-10 UT 03:09-04:18 Ill=99% Le_Verrier observed by Henderson on 1982-1-9

     On 1982 Jan 09 at UT18:46-21:42 Henderson, Sykes and Radley saw an 
     obscuration near Le Verrier - a completely circular halo with dark mare 
     showing through it for a duration of 15 minutes. This was during a 
     total eclipse of the Moon. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=162 and weight=5. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 03:09-04:18 Ill=99% Plato observed by Moore_P on 1982-1-9

     On 1982 Jan 09 at UT21:37 P. Moore (Selsey, UK) observed that Plato 
     underwent brightness and colour changes, during a total lunar eclipse. 
     At 20:07UT Madej observed a "slight anomaly in Plato". Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=162 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 03:09-04:18 Ill=99% Schmidt observed by Mobberley_M on 1982-1-9

     On 1982 Jan 09 at UT 18:46-21:42 M.Mobberley (UK) observed that Schmidt 
     was very bright compared to its surroundings during a total lunar 
     eclipse. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=162 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 03:09-04:18 Ill=99% W_Limb observed by Bouron on 1982-1-9

     On 1982 Jan 09 at UT18:46-21:42 Bouron (UK?) observed that the west 
     limb, during a total lunar eclipse, had dark orange on it. Cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=162 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 03:18-05:05 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Mobberley_M on 1984-12-7

     On 1984 Dec 07 at UT 19:30-23:30 M. Mobberley (St Edmunds, UK, 
     seeing=IV-V, transparency=good, spurious colour seen) found 2 
     bright pathces on the east rim on alternate sides of a bright region. 
     The band from the central 16km wide region was dark on the east side. 
     Foley (Kent, UK, 12"reflector, seeing=II-III) found Aristarchus to be 
     not as bright as normal, apart from the band that Mobberley found (1 
     hour later). The dark regions were a murky green colour (bright through 
     green, blue and yellow filters and dark through red and orange 
     filters). Cook (Frimley, UK, transparency=excellent, CCD camera used) 
     found a bright "bulge"on the eastern side. Apparently data suggests 
     that the band was brighter in red than in near IR light. Cook's 
     calibrated brightness measurements suggest that there was no change in 
     brightness over the crater with time. Two other bright points were 
     seen: one at the Cobra's Head and another half way between the east rim 
     of Aristarchus and passes Herodotus. Wratten 29 (deep red), Wratten 87 
     (near IR) and combined Wratten 29 and Wratten 87 were used. In the red 
     Wratten 29 filter the brightness falls at22:20 at Shroters valley and 
     then rises in the bright ray. They return to normal at 22:30UT. There 
     was however a lot of measurement noise from the brightness readings of 
     points B and D. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=256 and the weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3. 


2020-Jan-10 UT 03:48-04:57 Ill=99% NE_Limb observed by Unknown_Observer on 1963-12-30

     On 1963 Dec 30 at UT11:00 many observers reported seeing a red glow on 
     the North East (IAU?) limb of the Moon. This was also captured on a 
     photograph. Cameron suggests eclipse geometry as an explanation. Thye 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=792 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 04:37-05:57 Ill=99% Mare_Fecunditatis observed by Dubois on 1953-1-29

     On 1953 Jan 29/30 UT 23:00?, 01:00? Dubois (Floirae, France) observed 
     excess luminescence, in Mare Fecunditatis, between 420nm and 470nm 
     (maximum at 435nm) and between 480nm and 520nm (maximum near 505nm). 
     20-60% during eclipse at 50' from the centre of the umbra, during a 
     lunar eclipse. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=557 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-10 UT 04:40-05:47 Ill=99% Mare_Fecunditatis observed by Emersen_G on 2000-1-21

     On 2000 Jan 21 UT04:40 G. Emersen (Golden, CO, USA, 30cm focal length 
     lens with Wratten 25 ref filter) took 43 CCD images of the eclipse of 
     the Moon and on one of them at 04:40UT (exposure 0.3 sec) a relatively 
     bright spot appeared in the southern part of Mare Fecunditatis. The 
     spot looks sharper than the rest of the Moon and so might be a cosmic 
     ray? CCD images taken from Washington D.C. by A.C. Cook at this time, 
     do not show this spot, however exposures were at intervals of 0.25 sec 
     and so might have missed this spot if it happened during image readout. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 04:42-05:57 Ill=99% N_Pole observed by Brown_G on 1953-1-29

     On 1953 Jan 29-30 UT 23:05-01:40 G. Brown (UK?) observed a white patch 
     of light of low brightness was seen to move around the north polar 
     area. Coloured bands were also seen on the Moon.


2020-Jan-10 UT 04:52-05:57 Ill=99% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Dorna on 1877-2-27

     On 1877 Feb 27 at UT19:19 Prof. Dorna (Turin, Italy) observed a 
     flickering light on the lunar surface during a lunar eclipse. The  
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=186 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 04:59-05:57 Ill=99% Moon observed by Rankin on 1848-3-19

     On 1848 at UT 21:00 Rankin and Chevallier (France?): Luminous pts. seen 
     during an eclipse. Cameron ays that year 1847 given by Middlehurst must 
     be wrong as age is 2.7 days for this date in 1847 and could not be 18-
     19 as in Middlehurst because eclipse is on the 19th at 21h (mid) in 
     1948.  aux. data here are for 1848. At 21:12 Forster (England) and 
     Bruges (France) observed rapid changes in red colour. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=126 and 127 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 05:06-05:57 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Jackson on 1913-3-22

     On 1915 Mar 22 at UT 11:30-12:30 Jackson (France?) observed Aristarchus 
     during a total lunar eclipse: "Dur. totality there remained vis. to the 
     NW a red luminous pt. not much larger than Mars & of the same color". 
     (date & time is old system and has been converted by Cameron). The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=343 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-10 UT 05:11-05:50 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by Brook_C on 2000-6-16

     On 2000 Jun 15 UT 20:37 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, 60mm 
     refractor, x117 & x40, seeing good, transparency excellent) 
     observed abright spot on the north rim of Mare Crisium (57E, 
     25N). It was comparable to the illuminated rim of Proclus in 
     brightness. No colour seen. The spot was not visible the next 
     night. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 05:13-05:57 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Swift_L on 1895-3-11

     On 1895 Mar 10 L. Swift et. al (Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ, USA) 
     and Elger et al. (England), observed during a total lunar eclipse that 
     Aristarchus was glowing with brilliance never seen before. This 
     attracted everyones attantion. It extended its radiance to adjecent 
     craters (e.g. Herodotus) all throughout totality. At the subsequent 
     eclipse in September 1895 it was seen to be inconspicuous. the Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=283 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-10 UT 05:34-05:57 Ill=100% Picard observed by Bogdanovich on 1927-12-8

     On 1927 Dec 08 at 20:00 Bogdanovich (Russia) Picard: "Crater, after 
     coming out of shadow after ech. was unsually hazy. next FM it was back 
     to normal". The cameron 1978 catalog ID= and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 05:49-05:57 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Stuyvaert_E on 1898-12-27

     On 1898 Dec 27 at UT 23:00-00:00 Stuyvaert (France?) found that 
     Aristarchus was brilliant during an eclipse. The Cameron 1978 catalog 
     ID=302 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-10 UT 05:52-05:57 Ill=100% Theaetetus observed by Cherboneaux on 1902-10-16

     Thaetetus 1902 Oct 16 UT 18:10? Observed by Cherboneaux 
     (Meudon, France, 33" refractor) "Unmistakable white cloud 
     formed close to it." NASA catalogue weight=3. NASA catalogue 
     ID #313. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-10 UT 05:54-05:57 Ill=100% Dionysius observed by Ellison on 1917-1-8

     On 1917 Jan 08 at UT 07:30-08:30 Ellison (England?) observed a 
     point on the rim of Dionysius that shone like a star for some 
     time after entering the shadow during an eclipse (mid eclipse at 
     07:42. date given as 1/7/17 19:30-20:30 local time). The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=366 and the weight=2, The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-11 UT 01:27-02:09 Ill=100% Tycho observed by Rey on 1905-8-16

     On 1905 Aug 15 at UT 03:30 Rey (Marseilles, France) observed Tycho 
     during a lunar eclipse to be visible, indeed it was described as 
     brilliant during the eclipse (mid eclipse 03:31UT). The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=322 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-11 UT 02:45-03:55 Ill=100% Plato observed by Moore_P on 1967-11-17

     Plato 1967 Nov 17 UTC 18:36-18:50 Observed by Moore, Moseley 
     (Armagh, Northern Ireland, 10" refractor x260) "Faint blink 
     under SW wall. Nothing seen vis. Gone by 1839h. Reappeared at 
     1841, then gone by 1850h. Checks till 0200h were neg. Obs. 
     dubious of reality of phen." NASA catalog weight=2. NASA catalog 
     ID #1054. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-11 UT 02:48-03:53 Ill=100% Kepler observed by Classen on 1967-10-19

     Kepler 1967 Oct 19 UTC 05:00 Observed by Classen (Pulnitz Obs. East 
     Germany, 8" reflector) and Corralitos Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 
     24" reflector + moonblink) "It was 1 mag brighter than aristarchus when 
     normally Aris. is 0.3mag. brighter than Kep. Corralitos MB did not 
     confirm." NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalogue ID #1052.


2020-Jan-11 UT 06:06-07:02 Ill=100% Linne observed by Frost on 1906-2-9

     On 1906 Feb 08 after a lunar eclipse, Frost and Stebbins determined 
     that Linne had enlarged by 1" in size.


2020-Jan-12 UT 02:14-03:46 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1954-7-17

     In 1954 Jul 17 at UT06:50-07:15 Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA, S=
     5, T=5-1) observed near Aristarchus: "Pale violet tint on 
     surface NE of crater, no color elsewhere". The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=568 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-12 UT 06:00-07:55 Ill=97% Lalande observed by Galgoey on 1973-7-17

     LaLande 1973 Jul 17 UT 03:30-03:45 Observed by Galgoey (Washington, NJ, 
     USA, 2" refractor x46, x117), S=VG, T=5) "Star-like pt., variations, 1-
     2s, seen only at 40x, not at higher powers. LTP albedo =10, normal=8, 
     nearby plain =6 (geom, instrum. & atm. & refl. material at site 
     effects?)" NASA catalog weight=1 (very low). NASA catalog ID #1371.


2020-Jan-12 UT 06:15-08:12 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1954-12-12

     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 5" reflector x180) "Strong violet glare on 
     E. rim, changing to brown. At 0220 dark viol. in nimbus, at 0235 
     viol. changed to brown. At 0255 viol. suddenly reappeared, but 
     faded to invis. at 0300. Again at 0308 reapp. Only time he ever 
     saw such color changes." NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID 
     583. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-13 UT 02:53-03:07 Ill=93% Plato observed by Haas_W on 1938-5-17

     Plato 1938 May 17 UTC 08:00 Observed by Haas? (New Mexico?, USA, 
     12" reflector?) "Floor-least bit greenish (other colors on other 
     dates, e.g. Je 23, 7/22/37, & 7/15/38)." NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). ALPO/BAA weight=2. NASA catalog ID #437.


2020-Jan-13 UT 02:53-03:46 Ill=93% Cleomedes observed by Mizon_R on 1991-12-23

     Cleomedes 1991 Dec 23 UTC 22:50 Observed by Mizon (Colehill, 
     Dorset,  UK, 8" f/6 reflector x216) "Oval or pear-shaped ashy 
     glow visible for 2 min, then vanished quite suddenly" - Ref. 
     personal communication received by BAA Lunar Section.


2020-Jan-13 UT 02:55-04:07 Ill=93% Swift observed by Wilkins_HP on 1934-12-23

     Peirce A (Swift=IAU name?) 1937 Dec 23 UTC 22:00 Observed by Wilkins 
     (England, UK, 12.5" reflector) "Obscuration on floor if crater. Crater 
     invis. (similar to #394, 396)." NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA 
     catalog ID #412.


2020-Jan-14 UT 03:27-03:33 Ill=85% Macrobius observed by Gray_R on 2005-10-21

     On 2005 Oct 21 at UT 13:07-14:27 R. Gray (Winnemucca, NV, USA, 15cm F/9 
     refractor, x228, seeing 4-5, transparency 5-6) observed a possible TLP 
     in Macrobius. His report is as follows: "Blinked Macrobius with Wratten 
     Filters Blue 38A and Red 29. Macrobius became almost invisible through 
     the Blue 38A and essentially the same as in white light through the Red 
     29. The interior of the crater was completely in shadow. The only part 
     of the east wall that was visible was an apparent high point still in
     the sun and seen as a bright point of light. This faded into darkness 
     before 13:56UT. No sign of any illumination of the east wall crater 
     interior or the interior of the west wall was seen during the
     observation period. The outer west wall was a rough looking, 
     complicated mix of deep shadow and illuminated sunlit terrain." The 
     observer concluded that there was not a TLP - although he did get a 
     filter reaction, this may have been due to the different densities of 
     the filters? ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-14 UT 03:34-03:49 Ill=85% Macrobius observed by Goodacre_W on 1898-12-31

     Macrobius 1898 Dec 31 UTC 20:00 Observed by Goodacre (Crouch End, 
     England, 12" reflector) "Interior nearly filled with shadow at sunset. 
     Inner E.wall very bright-a distinct penumbral fringe to black shad. 
     cast on it from W.wall. Seen best using high powers. (Firsoff & MBMW 
     give date as just 1895 but must be wrong-phase - see  app.ref.)" 
     NASA catalog weight=4 and catalog ID #304. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-14 UT 04:38-05:56 Ill=85% Proclus observed by Lucas_M on 1989-8-20

     On 1989 Aug 20 at UT13:55 M. Lucas (Melbourne, Australia, naked eye) 
     witnessed a "pin-point flash" in the middle of the lower right quadrant 
     of the Full Moon. Foley suspects that this was in the Proclus region? 
     The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=374 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2020-Jan-14 UT 07:19-08:48 Ill=84% Copernicus observed by De_Groof on 1989-1-26

     On 1989 Jan 26 at UT 03:45 De Groof (Belgium) noted a white few second 
     long flash from Copernicus crater. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=347 and 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-14 UT 08:49-00:00 Ill=84% Aristarchus observed by Maley on 1969-9-30

     Aristarchus 1969 Sep 30 UT 04:46-05:10 Observed by Maley, Saulietis 
     (Houston, TX, USA, 16" reflector, x130) "Intermittent blue color on SE 
     wall, verified by others. At 0500h, taking 10s to reach max. then 
     slowly disappeared. Gap appeared after 1st event. Drawing." NASA 
     catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID #1202. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2020-Jan-15 UT 03:59-05:33 Ill=76% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1991-7-31

     On 1991 Jul 31 at UT 07:50 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 3" 
     refractor) observed that the south floor of Aristarchus was wellow - 
     "almost gold, spilled over S wall on ray toward Herodotus". Cameron 
     comments that Bartlett often reported a yellow floor but not a spill of 
     the colour over to the external ray. Cameron also comments that 
     Louderback's refractor would refract more in blue light than in yellow, 
     therefore she did not think that it was due to chromatic aberation. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=431 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2020-Jan-15 UT 03:59-05:33 Ill=76% Mons_Piton observed by Louderback_D on 1991-7-31

     On 1991 Jul 31 at UT 07:50 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 3" 
     refractor) found that all of Mons Piton was "unusually dark". Points D, 
     C (E and S resp), usually brightest points, but this time were not 
     bright. "Whole mt was as dark as W wall usually is at this time. In 
     violet filter Piton disappeared completely, but was a little brighter 
     in red filter and points D & G showed. Color not seen by eye. No albedo 
     measured. Suggests red event." Cameron rules out chromatic aberation 
     from Louderback's refractor. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=431 and the 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-15 UT 07:37-08:04 Ill=75% Plato observed by Foley_PW on 1975-6-28

     Plato 1975 Jun 28/29 UT 23:00-01:20. Foley (Wilmington, UK, 12" 
     reflector, seeing, III, good clarity transparency). At 23:00, 
     00:30, and 01:15 blue was seen on the inner wall:floor southern 
     boundary, and red on the corresponding northern floor:wall 
     boundary. However by 01:20, blue was now on the S-NW floor:wall 
     boundary, and red on the NE-SE floor:wall boundary. Atmospheric 
     spectral dispersion existed in many regions, but did not change 
     like the colours in Plato. Similar appearance craters such as 
     Grimaldi, Schickard, and Riccioli, were checked for a similar 
     change in colour, but no change was noticed in these. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-16 UT 07:46-08:20 Ill=64% Plato observed by Foley_PW on 1975-6-29

     Plato 1975 Jun 29/30 UT 23:05-00:30. Foley (Wilmington, UK, 12" 
     reflector, seeing, III, good clarity transparency). At 23:05, 
     blue was seen on the inner wall:floor southern boundary, and red 
     on the corresponding northern floor:wall boundary. However by 
     00:30, blue was now on the W floor:wall boundary, and red on the 
     E floor:wall boundary. Atmospheric spectral dispersion existed 
     in many regions, but did not change like the colours in Plato. 
     Similar appearance craters such as Grimaldi, Schickard, and 
     Riccioli, were checked for a similar change in colour, but no 
     change was noticed in these. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-17 UT 05:42-06:42 Ill=53% Plato observed by Moore_P on 1991-12-28

     On 1991 Dec 28 at UT 02:10 P. Moore (Selsey, UK) could see no detail on 
     the floor of Plato crater. This report needs to be read in context with 
     the comments by Cameron for A.C. Cook's observation of the floor of 
     Plato on 1992 Jan 18 - Cameron 2006 catalog ID=438.


2020-Jan-17 UT 08:05-08:45 Ill=52% Pitatus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1974-6-12

     On 1974 Jun 12 at UT0256 an unknown observer noted a dark blob on the 
     northern edge of the floor of Pitatus crater. 


2020-Jan-18 UT 05:36-08:22 Ill=41% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-19 UT 07:46-08:54 Ill=30% Grimaldi observed by Beaumont_S on 1998-3-22

     Grimaldi 1998 Mar 22 UT05:15-06:00 S. Beaumont (Windermere, UK, 
     127mm rich field refractor, seeing III, transparency Good) 
     observed that the northern half of Grimaldi seemed much lighter 
     than the southern half. She comments that she has seen this 
     before in last quarter phases, but it was really quite marked 
     how lighter the northern half was on this occasion. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-19 UT 06:13-08:23 Ill=30% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-20 UT 06:54-08:24 Ill=21% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-20 UT 08:31-08:55 Ill=21% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1976-10-18

     Aristarchus 1976 Oct 18 UT 07:42 Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, 
     USA, 4.5" reflector and 3" refractor, S=3, T=5) "Inner E. wall 6 deg 
     with very large EWBS at 8deg. No viol. color anywhere & floor was gray 
     at 4 deg (very low). C.p. is only 8 deg. At base of c.p. between peak & 
     advancing shadow a very faint but definite red glow was seen. It was 
     also seen later in the 3" refr. Was confined to W.base of peak & no 
     color on E. base tho. carefully searched for. This red glow was unique 
     in his experience of 28 yrs. His obs. thru. col. 223deg saw nothing 
     more unusual." Cameron 1978 catalog weight=4 and ID #1455.


2020-Jan-21 UT 07:52-08:56 Ill=13% Aristarchus observed by Schmidling on 1964-6-6

     On 1964 Jun 28 at UT 08:20-09:10 Schmidling, St Clair, and Platt 
     (Riverdale, New York, USA, 8" reflector, x256) observed in the 
     Aristarchus, Herodotus, Schroter's valley area: two red spot glows, 
     glimmer, looked like ruby gems. Cameron says that the date was 
     predicted by Greenacre and looked for. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=817 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.  


2020-Jan-21 UT 07:39-08:25 Ill=13% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-27 UT 22:51-23:07 Ill=9% Sinus_Medii observed by Gregory_of_Tours on 557-12-11

     In about 557AD (Month, Day and UT unknown), Gregory of Tours 
     observed a light on the Moon near the centre. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1. Note some say this was during the Dec 11 lunar 
     eclipse.


2020-Jan-27 UT 22:51-23:07 Ill=9% Aristarchus observed by Piazzi_Smyth on 1835-12-22

     In 1835 Dec 22 at UT17:00-18:30 Piazzi-Smyth (Edinburgh, UK) at 18:30UT 
     observed near Aristarchus a bright spot of magnitude 9-10 and at 
     17:00UT Baily (England) observed a star-like point, in Aristarchus. 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=113-114 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3. 


2020-Jan-28 UT 22:51-23:22 Ill=15% Thales observed by Barnard on 1892-4-1

     Thales 1892 Apr 04 UT 04:00-04:30 Observed by Barnard (Lick 
     Observatory, CA, USA, 36" refractor?, S=4/5) "Filled with pale luminous 
     haze tho all surrounding features were sharp & normal. Walls also hazy 
     (Drawing)" NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalogue ID #276.


2020-Jan-28 UT 22:51-23:35 Ill=15% Promontorium_Laplace observed by Ashton on 1989-2-9

     On 1989 Feb 09 at UT 19:00 Ashton (Stafford, UK, seeing=V) observed a 
     "green glow in the "peninsular region" of Cape La Place (south of poss. 
     Helicon A?) and brown on the Earthlit limb. Foley (Kent, UK, 12" 
     reflector) noticed a "pin point glow surrounded by blue-green halo" 
     through a blue filter, but not seen through a red filter. He also 
     suspected some brightness variations. He noted that Aristarchus was 
     barely seen and Copernicus was only a faint smudge, presumably because 
     of the bright limb? J. Cook (Frimley, UK) observed a white glow in the 
     Cape region (made up of pin points?) - no other places had a similar 
     effect. P. Moore (Selsey, UK, 12" reflector) reported that nothing 
     unsual was to be seen anywhere on the Moon. M. Cook (Frimley, UK) found 
     a "bright point source near the tip of LaPlace perhaps maupertius D (or 
     LaPlace D?)." This was seen in a blue filter but not through a red 
     filter - the limb was also seen as bright and the cape as a faint 
     patch. Holmes (Lancashire, UK, 30"? reflector or refractor?) although 
     commenting that Aristarchus was a bit dull, could not see the Sinus 
     Iridum glow, North (UK) could only detect the vague presence of 
     Earthshine throug his finder scope, but not in his telecope. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=349 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-28 UT 23:23-23:39 Ill=15% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-29 UT 22:50-23:08 Ill=22% Proclus observed by Marchart on 1971-1-1

     Proclus 1971 Jan 01 UTC 19:00-20:25 Observed by Marchart (Aldershot, 
     England, 8" refractor x500). "Color patch on N wall, red & green on 
     inside, even tho eyepieces were rotated & changed. (chrom aberr. ?) 
     (experienced observer)." NASA catalog weight=1 (very low). NASA catalog 
     ID #1280.


2020-Jan-29 UT 22:50-23:14 Ill=22% N_Pole observed by Chernov_VM on 1977-9-17

     On 1977 Sep 17 at 16:30UT V.M. Chernov (Soviet Union) observed the 
     northern cusp of the Moon to be elongated more than 180deg ashen light. 
     This was 4.3 days after new Moon. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-29 UT 22:50-23:26 Ill=22% Endymion observed by Arsyukhin on 1982-5-27

     On 1982 May 27 at UT 17:05-17:35 E.V. Arsyukhin (Moscow, Russia, 3" 
     reflector) found Endymion had a dark spot in the middle for about 30 
     min. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=169 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2020-Jan-29 UT 22:50-23:21 Ill=22% Lacus_Somniorum observed by Arsyukhin on 1982-5-27

     On 1982 May 27 at UT 17:05-17:35 E.V. Arsyukhin (Moscow, Russia, 3"
     reflector) found Lacus Sominorum was very bright, misty and the colour 
     varied. It was back to normal on the 28th and abnormal on 29-31st. - 
     had a dark spot in the middle for about 30 min. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=169 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2020-Jan-29 UT 22:50-23:07 Ill=22% Aristarchus observed by Holmes_D on 1989-2-10

     On 1989 Feb 10 at UT 18:15-18:40 Holmes and Wooler (Lancashire, 
     UK, 22cm Newtonian, x155) found Aristarchus to be bright, but so 
     too was Prinz. However in a 2nd observing session at 21:05-21:10 
     an area near crater both regions werestill visible but fainter. 
     The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=350 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2020-Jan-29 UT 22:58-23:52 Ill=22% Prinz observed by Holmes_D on 1989-2-10

     On 1989 Feb 10 at UT 19:00? D. Holmes and Wooler (Lancashire, UK) found 
     area near Prinz to be bright, but so too was Aristarchus crater.  The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=350 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-29 UT 22:58-23:52 Ill=22% Proclus observed by Edmonds on 1989-2-10

     On 1989 Feb 10 at UT 19:00? Edmonds (England) observed a "bright red 
     coppery" colour in the northwestern part of Proclus crater. He checked 
     and found that there was no colour elsewhere, though he still suspects 
     that the effect was spurious colour. Cameron comments that usually blue 
     is seen in the north and red in the south if due to spurious colour. 
     The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=350 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2020-Jan-29 UT 23:22-00:06 Ill=22% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-30 UT 23:02-00:29 Ill=30% Aristarchus observed by Cook_JD on 1981-3-11

     A faint white pinpoint flash seen and also in the same position
     a whitish glow around the crater. No futher flashes seen after the
     first one. From UT2117-2130 the glow was still visible but faded
     making it more difficult to locate. When Foley observed he found 
     Aristarchus not very visible in Earthshine, despite Plato, Grimaldi,
     and several other features being visible. Both observers used
     12" reflectors. Cameron's 2006 catalog Extension ID=124 and 
     weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=3. 


2020-Jan-30 UT 23:05-23:44 Ill=30% Aristarchus observed by Miles_H on 1985-4-25

     On 1985 Apr 25 at UT 21:34-22:04 H. Miles (England) observed 
     Aristarchus within Earthshine. Foley (Kent, UK, 12" reflector) had 
     observed it one hour prior to Miles and found it to be both dull and 
     blue - with a bright patch west of the crater on Aristarchus Upsilon 
     Mountain. At 21:45UT 6 star-like flashes seen on the floor. They 
     occurred again a few minutes later and repeated at 22:04UT.By 21:45UT 
     the bright patch had gone though. Smith (England) had also apparently 
     seen the flashes and a further glow, albeit more north of the one seen 
     by Foley. Miles confirmed Smith's glow north of Aristarchus. 
     Peters did not see much, indeed found Aristarchus to be quite 
     faint (2130-2141). The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=264 and the 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2020-Jan-30 UT 23:05-23:44 Ill=30% Torricelli_B observed by Cook_MC on 1985-4-25

     Curious lack of detail, but this may have been related to
     the seeing. Of greater interest though was a dark blue
     splodge where the crater should have been. Shadow seen through
     this splodge, but no crater rim seen.


2020-Jan-30 UT 23:21-00:00 Ill=30% Proclus observed by Cook_MC on 1985-4-25

     Almost certainly the following was spurious colour and not
     a TLP. Proclus was found to be brighter than Censorinus. 
     Red was seen on the northern inner floor and blue on the
     edge of the external north rim NNE-NW. The rim to the SW
     could not be seen. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2020-Jan-30 UT 23:21-00:31 Ill=31% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2020-Jan-31 UT 22:48-23:41 Ill=39% Aristarchus observed by Butler_FC on 1981-3-12

     On 1981 Mar 12 at UT 19:25-20:30 Butler (of Brixton, UK, using a 
     10" reflector at 32-64x) noticed that Aristarchus was not 
     visible, although the Earthshine was very obvious. Foley (of 
     Kent, UK, and using  12" reflector) noticed that the crater was 
     only just visible but Plato could definitely be seen. Cameron's 
     2006 TLP extension catalog ID=125 and weight=0. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2020-Jan-31 UT 23:37-23:59 Ill=40% W_Limb observed by Vince_AW on 1948-4-15

     In 1948 Apr 15 at UT 20:00? Vince (England, UK) observed a bright spot, 
     about magnitude 3, in Earthshine, about 30deg north of Grimaldi., on 
     the west limb (90W, 25N). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=503 and the 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2020-Jan-31 UT 23:44-23:59 Ill=40% Mont_Blanc observed by Schroter on 1789-9-26

     On 1789 Sep 26 at UT 03:30 Schroter (Lillienthal, Germany) observed 
     close beneath Mons Blanc at the west foot, in the dark, a small 5th 
     magnitude, speck of light. Its round shadow was sometimes black, 
     sometimes grey. Cameron suspects that this is the same as her TLP 
     report No. 50. the Cameron 1978 catalog ID=62 and weight=4. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.