TLP Repeat Illumination/Libration and Earthshine predictions for: Portugal - Lisbon



Ill is percentage illumination of the Moon
*Indicates a repeat illumination and libration event to within +/- 1 deg for both
A non-* indicates just repeat illumination to within +/-0.5 deg


2019-Feb-07 UT 18:33-18:39 Ill=7% Earthshine: Alpha Centaurids: ZHR=6) vel=56km/s

2019-Feb-07 UT 19:47-20:03 Ill=7% Aristarchus observed by Celis on 1969-10-14 *

     On 1969 Oct 14 at UT 00:00-00:30 Celis et al. (Valparaiso, 
     Chile, seeing=good and transparency=good). observed Aristarchus 
     and found it to be: "Scintillating in irreg. way. Pulses of 1m 
     each time changing with normal & irreg. periods. Best time to 
     see this is 2-3d age. Brightenings comparable to 7.0-7.5 mag. 
     stars, at age 2.2d;7.6-8.0 mag. at age 3.0 & 8.5-9.0 mag. at 
     4.2d. Moon obs. from age 1d to 62d with several refr. & refl. in 
     program of obs. of scintillation in ashen light. 
     (Atmospheric?)". The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1203 and weight=1. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-08 UT 18:02-18:55 Ill=13% Picard observed by Unknown_English_Observer on 1909-5-23

     In 1909 May 23 at UT 18:00? an unknown English observer observed a 
     bright spot east of Picard. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=330 and the 
     weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-08 UT 18:02-18:12 Ill=13% Mare_Crisium observed by Moore_P on 1949-3-3

     Barker's Quadrangle (26W, 34S) 1949 Mar 03 UT 20:00 Observed by 
     Moore (England, 12" reflector) "Whole area hazy. (in Capuanus? 
     see Wilkins and Moore, The Moon, p124) (It may not be this 
     identification as 3 of 4 obs. are in dark, some nr. FQ so 
     doubtful it could be seen)." NASA catalog ID #516, weight=4. 
     ALPO/BAA wight=2.


2019-Feb-08 UT 18:02-18:56 Ill=13% Aristarchus observed by Bornhurst on 1965-12-27

     On 1965 Dec 27 at UT Bornhurst (Monterey Park, CA, USA, 10" reflector) 
     and (Harris (Whittier? CA, USA, 19" reflector?) observed brightening of 
     Aristarchus in Ashen light. Cameron says that this is an independent 
     confirmation? The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=918 and weight=4. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-08 UT 18:02-18:13 Ill=13% Aristarchus observed by Kalauch on 1982-5-26

     On 1982 May 26 at UT 20:25-20:40 Kalauch (Berlin?, Germany, 9" 
     refractor, x60, T=1(best) and scintilation=2) found Aristarhus to be 
     "very visible" in Earthshine - which was very clear. At 20:25 UT 
     Aristarchus was seen to blink irregularly and then it attained 
     magnitude 7 (red). Telescopes and eyepieces were changed but did not 
     effect the appearance. It disappered at 20:40UT. Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=168 and weight=2. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-08 UT 18:34-19:39 Ill=13% Earthshine: Alpha Centaurids: ZHR=6) vel=56km/s

2019-Feb-08 UT 20:27-21:00 Ill=13% Aristarchus observed by Amery_GW on 1983-2-16 *

     On 1983 Feb 15 at UT 18:00? G. Amery (Reading, UK) found that he could 
     not see Aristarchus in Earthshine, despite less normally priminent 
     features being clearly seen. This observation was confirmed. Other 
     observers were: Moore, Cooks, and Foley. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=
     203 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-09 UT 18:03-18:06 Ill=20% Mare_Nubium observed by Cook_AC on 1986-3-15

     On 1986 Mar 15 UT 19:51-19:55 A. Cook (Frimley, UK, Naked Eye 
     and 12" reflector, x60, seeing IV, transparancy poor) 
     observed a naked eye flash at 19:50.5 UT in the Mare Nubium 
     area. The flash was white in colour and lasted not longer 
     than 0.5 sec and was about magnitude 2 at most in brightness. 
     There was no rise or fade associated with this flash. Upon 
     checking the area with the telescope, the observer reproted 
     seeing a faint fuzzy small patch that came and went over 
     several seconds in the same general area - but this may have 
     been due to the seeing conditions and/or glare from the 
     bright side of the Moon. The patch area was about the same 
     size as Aristarchus, i.e. approx 40 km across. Note however 
     that observing conditons were too poor that night to see 
     Aristarchus. At later observing sessions from  20:30UT 
     onwards, the patch was not seen. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-09 UT 18:46-20:20 Ill=20% Aristarchus observed by Miles_H on 1990-1-1

     On 1990 Jan 01 at UT 16:55-18:45 H. Miles (Cornwall, UK) observed that 
     Aristarchus was seen in Earthshine at 16:55UT before the limb (was 
     visible in Earthshine?). "1705 Aris>>1723 fading 1727 > again." Then: 
     "1740 Aris << and just visible at 1845". Apparently Foley suspects that 
     Aristarchus had brightened up before 16:55UT (shwen H. Miles started to 
     observe) and then gradually retruned to normal. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=385 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-09 UT 19:20-20:37 Ill=20% Copernicus observed by Miles_H on 1990-1-1

     On 1990 Jan 01 at UT 17:29 H. Miles (Cornwall, UK) observed that 
     Copernicus had a faint glow in it. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=385 and 
     the weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-09 UT 19:46-21:58 Ill=20% Aristarchus observed by Amery_GW on 1983-2-17 *

     On 1983 Feb 17 at 19:00?UT G. Amery (Reading, UK) noticed that 
     Aristarchus was not visible in Earthshine, despite other less prominent 
     features being seen. The observation was confirmed by other observers. 
     The Cameron 2006 catalog extension ID=204 and the weight=2. The 
     ALPo/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-09 UT 19:46-21:58 Ill=20% Messier observed by Amery_GW on 1983-2-17 *

     On 1983 Feb 17 at 19:00?UT G. Amery (Reading, UK) noticed that 
     Messier was ill-defined. The Cameron 2006 catalog extension ID=204 and 
     the weight=2. The ALPo/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-09 UT 18:35-20:39 Ill=20% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Feb-10 UT 18:04-18:27 Ill=28% Aristarchus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Feb-10 UT 18:04-18:27 Ill=28% Campanus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johnson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Feb-10 UT 18:04-18:27 Ill=28% Hecataeus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Feb-10 UT 18:04-18:27 Ill=28% Hevelius observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Feb-10 UT 18:04-19:40 Ill=28% Santbech observed by Rogers_G on 1994-6-14 *

     On 1994 Jun 14 UT 21:45-22:00 G.Rogers (Crendon, UK, 3" Zeiss 
     refractor, sky conditions perfectly clear) reported seeing three 
     very large whitish clouds against the Moon. The strongest seemed 
     to "stem" from the vicinity of Santbech crater (crater 
     identified the next day from an atlas), and was a milk chocolate 
     colour near the stem. The other two large clouds were to the 
     north - in the general area of Mare Fecunditatis and Mare 
     Crisium though perhaps slightly further west and in contact with 
     the terminator? The effect was confirmed (independently) by 4 
     other observers using the same telescope. The telescope was 
     moved but the clouds remained in the same position over the 
     Moon. This report comes from The Astronomer Jan 2013 p 230. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-10 UT 19:00-20:29 Ill=29% Proclus observed by Darling_D on 1989-2-11

     On 1989 Feb 11 at UT23:30-01:39 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x159, seeing=7/10) observed a linear east to west feature in 
     Proclus. D. Weier (WI, USA, 11" reflector, x378) found the NNW part of 
     the crater to be brighter than expected and confirmed the prescence of 
     the east to west feature - this crossed the shadow on the east floor 
     and over into Mare Crisium. R. Manske (WI, USA) detected another 
     "streak" parallel to this. All observers suspect that the linear 
     features were due to raised topography on the floor of Proclus - 
     however Cameron comments that there does not seem to be any linear 
     features on the floor of Proclus to cause these effects. The Cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=351 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-10 UT 19:02-20:17 Ill=29% Kant observed by Trouvelot on 1873-1-4

     Kant 1873 Jan 04 UT 23:00? Observed by Trouvelot (Cambridge, Mass, 8" 
     refractor) "Luminous puplish vapors" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). 
     NASA catalog ID #180.


2019-Feb-10 UT 19:14-20:47 Ill=29% Aristarchus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Feb-10 UT 19:14-20:47 Ill=29% Campanus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Feb-10 UT 19:14-20:47 Ill=29% Hecataeus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Feb-10 UT 19:14-20:47 Ill=29% Hevelius observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Feb-10 UT 19:41-21:11 Ill=29% Aristarchus observed by Classen on 1967-4-15

     On 1967 Apr 15 at UT 19:15-21:00 Classen (Pulsnitz Observatory, East 
     Germany, 8" refractor) found that Aristarchus was very bright and the 
     atmospheric seeing was very good until 21:00UT. Nothing unsual was seen 
     on 16th and 17th April. Cameron reports that this was the first TLP 
     seen by this group. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1022 and the weight=3. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-10 UT 20:15-21:36 Ill=29% Aristarchus observed by Stretton on 1794-3-7

     On 1794 Mar 07 at UT 20:00 Stretton and Wilkins (England, UK) 
     observed Aristarchus appearing as a light like a star in 
     Earthsine to the naked eye(independent confirmation according 
     to Cameron?). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=73 and 74 and the 
     weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-10 UT 20:49-22:56 Ill=29% SW_Limb observed by Moeller_J on 2012-5-26 *

     On 2012 May 26 UT21:21 J. Moeller (Syracuse, NY, USA, using a 
     Konica Minolta DIMAGE Z5 digital camera, f/7.1, 1/250 sec 
     exposure, ISO-50, 69mm focal length, digital zoom x3) captured
     a hand held image of the Moon in daylight. On the SW limb of 
     the dark side of the Moon a bright spot can be seen. This has 
     a brightness comparable to that of Mare Serenitatis. There is 
     also a fainter dark blurred marking further inside the dark side. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-10 UT 18:36-21:38 Ill=29% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Feb-11 UT 18:05-19:19 Ill=38% Unknown observed by Gaboreau on 1895-9-25

     On 1895 Sep 25 at UT 20:00? Gaboreau (Paris, France) observed on the 
     Moon s shaft of light (same observation as Cameron's TLP report #281 
     and further more it is on the same day and month as it was back in 
     1893. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=286 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Feb-11 UT 18:37-22:38 Ill=39% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Feb-12 UT 18:07-18:26 Ill=48% Earthshine observed by Spellman_R on 2004-11-20

     2004 Nov 20 UT 03:12:29  R. Spellman (120mm F8.3 refractor at 
     prime focus,  PC23C CCTV camera, via a DVD recorder) recorded 
     a flash of light. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-12 UT 18:29-20:17 Ill=48% Ptolemaeus observed by Cook_AC on 1978-4-15

     Ptolemaeus 1978 Apr 15 UTC 21:54-22:20 Observed by A.Cook 
     (Frimley, Surrey, UK, 12" reflector x240, S=IV (Antoniadi)) 
     "Small triangular area on the NW floor of the crater, at the 
     foot of the rim, was slightly brighter in blue light than in red 
     (Moonblink used). Suspected this was due to the poor observing 
     conditions. Certainly blink reaction was not unmistakable". 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-12 UT 19:22-20:07 Ill=49% Archimedes observed by Hill_EG on 1966-3-29

     Archimedes 1966 Mar 29 UT 21:00 Observed by Hill (England, 24" 
     reflector, x250, S=E) "Brightening of E-W bands across floor. 
     (Obscuration accord. to Moore)" NASA catalog ID #923. NASA 
     catalog weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-12 UT 20:27-22:24 Ill=49% Mons_Pico observed by Quinn on 1986-11-9

     On 1986 Nov 09 at UT 23:00 Quinn (Glebview, IL, USA, 8" reflector, x49-
     x305) found īn the vicinity of an unnamed ridge points toward Pico- two 
     bright points about 5 magnitudes brighter than any other part of the 
     Moon. The Alpine valley points directly between these two points. "Came 
     from apparently featureless area. Both points about the same size, but 
     different shapes ~ width of alpine valley" The observer used 4 
     different eyepieces and the points were brightest in the lowest power. 
     Other specks of light could be seen in the darkness wound the N point. 
     The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=289 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Feb-12 UT 21:03-22:52 Ill=49% Archimedes observed by Burnerd on 1922-5-4

     In 1922 May 04 at UT Burnerd (England?) discovered three long mounds in 
     Archimedes crater (rays?). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=385 and weight=
     0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-12 UT 22:19-23:20 Ill=49% Alphonsus observed by Wise on 1967-4-17

     Alphonsus and limb 1967 Apr 17 UTC 21:30 Observed by Wise (England, 
     6.5" reflector, x90) "3 dark patches (Alphonsus) prominent. Suspected 
     red patch (blink ?). (indep. confirm. of Cross 1h later?)." NASA 
     catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1024.


2019-Feb-12 UT 22:19-23:20 Ill=49% Plato observed by Wise on 1967-4-17

     Plato 1967 Apr 17 UTC 21:30 Observed by Wise (England, 6.5" reflector, 
     x90) "Suspected a blink, (red?)" NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA 
     catalog ID #1025.


2019-Feb-12 UT 22:19-23:20 Ill=49% W_Limb observed by Wise on 1967-4-17

     On 1967 Apr 17 UT 21:30 Observed by Wise (England, 6.5" reflector, x90) 
     saw a brilliant object nr. E(ast. ?) limb (West Lim IAU?) for 15m. 
     Check on star maps neg. (indep. confirm. of Cross 1h later?)." NASA 
     catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1024.


2019-Feb-12 UT 22:23-23:37 Ill=49% Montes_Teneriffe observed by Hart_R on 1854-12-27

     nr. Plato in Teneriffe Mountains 1854 Dec 27 UT 18:00-23:00 
     Observed by Hart & others (Glasgow, Scotland, 10" reflector) "2 
     luminous fiery spots on bright side on either side of a ridge, 
     contrasting color. Seemed to be 2 active volcanoes. Ridge was 
     normal color. Spots were yellow or flame color. Never seen 
     before in 40 yrs. of observing." NASA catalog weight=4 (high). 
     NASA catalog ID #129. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-12 UT 22:27-23:37 Ill=49% Alphonsus observed by Jasmin_G on 2003-4-10

     On 2003 Apr 10 at 00:40UT a GLR observer G. Jasmin (Quebec, Canada, 
     using a 10" F-10 Schmidt Cassegrain) took a photograph of Alphonsus 
     crater on Kodak 400ASA film with an exposure of 1/30th sec. There was a 
     light visible (diameter 10 km) inside Alphonsus and the effect was 
     present for 5 minutes. The observer commented that they have seen a 
     light in this crater many times before, but never as long as 5 minutes.
     This report was submitted to the GLR group in Italy. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Feb-12 UT 22:44-23:37 Ill=50% Theaetetus observed by Moore_P on 1952-12-24

     Thaetetus 1952 Dec 24 UT 20:00? Observed by Moore (England?) 
     "Bright spot, hazy line of light" NASA catalog weight=4. NASA 
     catalog ID 556. ALPO/BAA weigh=2.


2019-Feb-12 UT 23:22-23:37 Ill=50% Plato observed by Lade on 1889-6-6

     On 1889 Jun 06 at 22:00 UT Lade of France (8" refractor) saw two 
     extremely bright spots (Plato B & D). Cameron 1978 catalog ID=262 and 
     weight=2. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-12 UT 23:27-23:37 Ill=50% Chacornac observed by Khachatryan_S on 2009-8-28

     On 2009 Aug 28 at UTC 17:00:15-17:00:42 S. Khachatryan (Yerevan, 
     Armenia, 127mm Maksutov-Cassegrain, x171, seeing 9 (1=worst and 10-
     best), Transparency 5-6 on a scale of 1 to 6) observed in the Chacornac 
     area a series of fiery sparks (dot like with tiny rays), slightly 
     elongated with the multitudinal rays orientated towards the south west 
     direction. The colour was mostly red, with some yellow. The final flash 
     was the most clear. The TLP was tiny in area, but "was distinctly 
     bright against any other object on the Moon". The positional 
     uncertainty of the location of the spark effect was approximately +/-
     150 km, based upon an examination of an atlas afterwards. Just prior to 
     the spark effect, something dark, small and fuzzy (only just discrnable 
     to the eye, through the eyepiece) was seen to pass from the west across 
     the Moon in a slight curve, round the surface of the Moon to the east 
     (post observation estimate: seen for 3.5 sec and covered roughly 8% of 
     the lunar diameter in that time). The area of the dark object was 
     comparable in size to (or slightly less than?) craters such as 
     Autolycus F (diameter 3km) or le Monnier E (diameter 4km) i.e. on the 
     limits of vision of the scope used. The location of the flash was not 
     exactly at the same location as the dark object passed across, but gave 
     the impression of starting from it? A back of the envelope calculation 
     of the lunar diameter covered in the time quoted gives an approximate 
     speed (at the lunar distance) of 80km/s or on the very high end of 
     typical meteor streams that pass by. At closer distances, and 
     recalculated velocities, it is unlikely to be a satellite in low Earth 
     orbit (20m/sec at 100km distance), but could perhaps be a bird or 
     insect at a few km range? So was this dark object something in our
     atmosphere by chance passing across the field of view close to the time 
     of the TLP flare or was at the lunar distance and related to the TLP? 
     Incidentally, no attempt was made during this observation to move the 
     scope to check that the TLP remained stationary against the Moon. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-12 UT 18:38-23:39 Ill=50% Earthshine: (radio) Chi Capricornids: ZHR=low

2019-Feb-13 UT 19:39-21:05 Ill=59% Aristarchus observed by Madej_P on 1984-12-31

     Although the crater was on the night side, a small bright spot
     was seen. This was blue, almost UV, and equivalent to a star of
     magnitude 2. It flashed over intervals of about 30 seconds
     and changed in colour from UV to blue. The BAA Lunar Section
     TLP network was alerted. Mobberly and J.Cook did not see much
     although J. Cook may have seen something, but located else where?
     Cameron lists this as a confirmed? observation? The Cameron
     2006 TLP xtension catalog has this TLP with an ID No. of 258
     and a weight of 4. The ALPO/BAA weight is 2.


2019-Feb-13 UT 19:45-20:21 Ill=59% Proclus observed by Farrant_M on 1967-4-18

     Proclus 1967 Apr 18 UTC 18:40-18:45 Observed by Farrant (Cambridge, 
     England, 8" reflector x175) "Crater appeared quite dark, even bright 
     ring was subdued & seemed thicker than normal. Drawing." NASA catalog 
     weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1028. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-13 UT 21:39-22:46 Ill=60% Plato observed by Moore_P on 1995-9-3

     On 1995 Sep 03 at UT19:40-20:15 P. Moore (Selsey, UK, 15" reflector at 
     x400) observed that the floor of Plato was much darker than he would 
     normally expect and futhermore no interior craterlets were seen. there 
     was however a white patch that was barely visible at the location of 
     the central craterlet should have been. G. North (UK) attempted to 
     observe nut the Moon was too low and seeing terrible. F. Doherty 
     reported Plato normal. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=475 and weight=3. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-13 UT 22:06-23:55 Ill=60% Linne observed by Tacchini on 1868-7-28

     Linne 1868 Jul 28 UT 20:00? Observed by Tacchini (Palermo, Italy) 
     "Shadow not so marked-had a light penumbra, indicated a feeble cavity. 
     Other craters had a black shad. On 29th appeared completely white. 
     Crater normal on 26th. (letter to Madler Sep. 16, 1868)." NASA 
     catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID #159.


2019-Feb-13 UT 22:18-23:39 Ill=60% Tycho observed by Albert_J on 2010-8-19

     On 2010 Aug 19 at UT 00:50-01:02 J.Albert (Lakeworth, FL, USA, 
     C11, Transparency 3, Seeing 7-8, 86F and very humid. Oberver 
     checking out repeat illumination condition appearence for Tycho 
     concerning LTP #468 in the 1978 Cameron catalog. Did not see the 
     effect from the original TLP report, but did see, immediately at 
     looking at Tycho a very faint hint of redness in a pencil thin 
     arc (< 1/4 circumference of the rim) confined to the top of the 
     rim of the well-lit north east wall. Coloured arc similar in 
     thickness to Rupes Recta, but not as sharply defined. The outer 
     (E) edge was perhaps sharper than the inner edge. The redness 
     was more on the inside of the top of the rim. The outside of the 
     rim was bright white. This effect was seen in three different 
     eyepieces, at 311x, 224x and 400x. Checked for the effect on 
     other craters nearby but could not see this effect anywhere 
     else. The colour had dissapeared by 01:02UT. The fade took about 
     1-2 minutes. Observation of Tycho continued until 01:06UT, but 
     all seemed normal. Quick checks were made again on Tycho 
     periodically until 02:50UT but the colour was not seen again. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-13 UT 23:12-00:39 Ill=60% Plato observed by Reese_EJ on 1949-3-9

     Plato 1949 Mar 09 UT 02:00-03:00 E.J.Reese (6" reflector x240) 
     and one hour later T.R.Hake (5" refractor x300) both unable to 
     see any detail on the floor of Plato, despite both being able to 
     see a "difficult to see" cleft near to the crater Connon. Reese 
     was able to see detail under similar illumination back in 1948 
     and 1947 and saw the floor craterlets in Plato clearly then. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2019-Feb-13 UT 23:20-23:37 Ill=60% Mare_Humorum observed by Dixon_M on 1989-2-15

     On 1989 Feb 15 at UT 03:15-03:30 M. Dixon (Palenque Ruins, Mexico, 7x35 
     binouculars) observed a point of light that was very bright in or near 
     Mare Humorum. It was visible for 5 minutes then vanished. The Cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=353 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2019-Feb-13 UT 23:37-23:59 Ill=61% Ross_D observed by Harris on 1964-2-22

     On 1964 Feb 22 at UT 05:00 Harris (Whittier, CA, 19" reflector, x100) 
     observed the appearance of a ring to the south east of Ross D. Cameron 
     says that 7 persons have seen this over a 2.5 year period. The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=801 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-14 UT 00:28-00:39 Ill=61% Copernicus observed by Firsoff on 1955-7-28

     Copernicus 1955 Jul 28 UT 20:20 Observed by Firsoff (Somerset, England, 
     6.5" reflector x200) "Great brilliance of the terraces in E(IAU?) wall 
     system(?) gets specular refl. (he gave 0820UT, but must have meant 
     2020" NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog No. #600.


2019-Feb-14 UT 18:09-18:13 Ill=70% Mare_Imbrium observed by Caruso_J on 1979-8-3

     A region of the Mare Imbrium was extremely bright, giving
     a reading of 8 out of 10 on the Elger scale. Cameron notes
     that from photos of the Full Moon, the area appears to
     normally be the brightness of Archimedes floor i.e. 3.5 out
     of 10 on the Elger scale. Atmospheric seeing was excellent
     and the observer could see a lot of fine detail with their
     2.4" and 3" refractors. Cameron 2006 catalog extension ID=62
     and weight=3.


2019-Feb-14 UT 19:51-21:41 Ill=70% Proclus observed by Cook_MC on 1982-2-3

     M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK) got an abnormally low brightness reading for
     Proclus, despite nearby Censorinus being normal. Crater Extinction
     Device used. The Cameron 2006 Extension catalog ID was 163 and the 
     weight was 3. The ALPO/BAA weight was 2 too.


2019-Feb-14 UT 21:34-21:53 Ill=71% Plato observed by Porter on 1976-9-4

     Plato 1976 Sep 04 UT 02:35-03:35 Observed by Porter 
     (Sarragansett?, Rhode Island, USA, 6" reflector x100, S=5, 
     T=?) "At 0235h albedo of floor was est. at 3. At 0325h the pt. 
     was albedo =1, 2 whole steps darker than earlier & noticeable 
     to the obs. 10-15 min later it returned to normal. (the few 
     meas. of albedo for this age were 1.5-2 which suggests that 
     the meas. of 3 was the anomalous one. Another pt. did 
     darken -- as reported). NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID 
     #1448. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-14 UT 23:13-00:42 Ill=71% Plato observed by Davies_H on 1988-10-20

     H. Davies (Llamandel, Swansea, UK, using a 3" refractor,
     detected a short duration reddish hue along the inner NE-NW? 
     rim (4-7 O'Clock location. Sketch supplied to Foley (BAA 
     coordinator). No similar effect seen elsewhere. A.C. Cook 
     (Frimley, UK) detected spurious colour on several craters, 
     including Plato that night. Cameron 2006 Catalog Extension ID=
     337 and weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-14 UT 23:31-01:09 Ill=71% Mare_Crisium observed by Arsyukhin on 1981-6-12

     Arsyukhin and others (Moscow, USSR), with naked eye and binouculars 
     saw three dark spots suddenly appear on Mare Crisium and disappear 
     approximately 30 minutes later. Cameron 2006 catalog extension ID=145
     and catalog weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-14 UT 23:31-01:09 Ill=71% Plato observed by Arsyukhin on 1981-6-12

     Arsyukhin and others (Moscow, USSR), with naked eye and binouculars 
     saw TLP activity in Plato that Cameron thinks confirms what UK
     observers saw later. Cameron 2006 catalog extension ID=145
     and catalog weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-15 UT 00:10-01:31 Ill=71% Alphonsus observed by Jenning on 1966-4-1

     Alphonsus 1966 Apr 01 UT(?) 03:00-03:20 Observed by Jenning, 
     Harris (Coral Estates, CA, USA, 12" reflector) "Red patch from 
     c.p. to W. wall (no confirm. from Corralitos obs. moon blink 
     device & obs. at that time)" NASA catalog weight=3. NASA 
     catalog ID #924. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-15 UT 01:01-01:29 Ill=72% Agrippa observed by Capron on 1878-12-4

     Agrippa and vicinity 1878 Dec 04 UT 20:00? Observed by Capron (France?) 
     "Odd, misty look as if vapor were in or about them" NASA catalog 
     weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #209.


2019-Feb-15 UT 01:05-01:42 Ill=72% Plato observed by North_G on 1980-7-22

     On 1980 Jul 22 at UT20:08-21:50 G.North (Sussex, UK, 8" reflector, x144 
     and x207, seeing III-V and transparency fair) suspected an obscuration 
     on the north and north west wall. The effect came and went. May have 
     been due to seeing and image contrast? Cameron 2006 catalog ID=101 and 
     weight=1. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-15 UT 18:10-19:50 Ill=80% Plato observed by Mobberley_M on 1982-6-2

     Plato 1982 Jun 02 UT 22:00. Mobberley could not see the 
     central craterlet on the floor of Plato tonight. Foley notes 
     that he could only just see the central craterlet on nights of 
     2-5th Jun and it was of reduced in brightness from normal. 
     North reported that the floor seemed nearly black, but 
     brighter in a green filter (x144 magnification used). All 
     three observers compared the Plato area to other areas for 
     reference. All the above seems normal, apart from the floor
     being brighter in the green filter. Cameron 2006 extension 
     catalog ID 170 and weight=5. BAA/ALPO weight=2.


2019-Feb-15 UT 20:51-21:31 Ill=80% Torricelli_B observed by Cook_MC on 1983-4-23

     A blue tinge was seen inside and outside the crater
     perimeter. The surrounding halo lost brightness that
     was observed on 1993 Jan 29. Observed on Apr 19, 20 and 28th.
     Cameron 2006 extension catalog ID=213 and weight=5.
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-15 UT 21:52-23:50 Ill=81% Torricelli_B observed by North_G on 1990-1-7

     On 1990 Jan 07 at UT 20:20-20:58 G.North (Herstmonceux, UK) thought 
     that he detected dullness in Torricelli B crater - Cameron comments 
     that this cannot be shadow). The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=386 and the 
     weight=3. ALPO\/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-15 UT 23:46-00:30 Ill=81% Plato observed by Watkins_E on 1971-9-30

     Plato 1971 Oct 30 UT 19:35-20:55 E.Watkins (Braintree, UK, 4.5" 
     reflector, x45,x150, x225), thought he saw a faint patch at 
     19:35 and it still was visible at 19:40. At 19:50-19:55 he saw 
     what may have been the remainder. At 20:55 he noticed a shadow 
     in the area. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-16 UT 00:52-04:09 Ill=81% Plato observed by Fauth on 1906-3-6 *

     Plato 1906 Mar 06 UT 22:00? Observed by Fauth (Germany? 6" refractor) 
     "Color (brightness?) greatly enhanced as it was to be on the next 
     nite" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #324.


2019-Feb-16 UT 01:59-02:45 Ill=82% Swift observed by Wilkins_HP on 1927-5-12

     Peice A (Swift=IAU name?) 1927 May 12 UT 22:03 Observed by Wilkins 
     (England, 15" reflector) "Complete obscuration of crater. Saw no trace 
     of it. It was vis. May 11 & faint on May 13. 3x in 1948 Moore saw whole 
     area misty gray & devoid of detail, whereas surroundings were sharp & 
     clear. Birt also found it invis. at times in late 1800's" NASA catalog 
     weight=4. NASA catalog ID #394. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-16 UT 02:08-02:45 Ill=82% Hyginus observed by Bradford on 1959-9-13

     Near Hyginus 1959 Sep 13 UT Observed by Bradford (S.Shields, 
     England, 15"? reflector), Feist, Lovas (Hungary), Moore, Wilkins 
     (Kent, England, 7" refractor, x500) "Obliterated by a hovering 
     cloud (Feist disagrees). Budapest obs. saw a cloud at 21:02:30, 
     lasting 5 m. Moore & Wilkins saw burst of light & dust cloud at 
     21:02:35 (confirm.) Drawing by Lovas." NASA catalog weight=5 and 
     catalog ID #722. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-16 UT 02:08-02:45 Ill=82% Littrow observed by Bradford on 1959-9-13

     Littrow, 1959 Sep 13 UT Observed by Bradford (S.Shields, 
     England, 15"? reflector), Feist, Lovas (Hungary), Moore, Wilkins (Kent, 
     England, 7" refractor, x500) "Obliterated by a hovering cloud (Feist 
     disagrees). Budapest obs. saw a cloud at 21:02:30, lasting 5 m. Moore & 
     Wilkins saw burst of light & dust cloud at 21:02:35 (confirm.) Drawing 
     by Lovas." NASA catalog weight=1 and catalog ID #722. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Feb-16 UT 02:18-02:45 Ill=82% Aristarchus observed by Weier_D on 1990-1-8

     On 1990 Jan 08 at UT00:55 D. Weier (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x159) observed an "anomalous black bar across Aris. Nearly 
     digonal to terminator." The nearby crater Prinz had curious shadow 
     patterns, perhaps related to the rising sun projecting shadows from the 
     eastern rim and "reflected down"? "At 0224 W wall had a break in it & a 
     diffuse glow where it should not be. Manske thinks it was Earthshine 
     effect. At 0305 Weier saw Manske's bar - with diffused light and 
     flicker like an aurora - like a gas with electric charge. At 0325 saw a 
     strange glow in Aris. but may be due to atm. though thought it to be a 
     LTP. Darling had never seen such effects before (flickering implies a 
     medium in it)." The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=387 and the weight=3. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-16 UT 18:11-18:57 Ill=88% Herodotus observed by Haas_W on 1954-8-11 *

     Observed by Haas (Las Cruces, NM, USA) "Temporary greyness seen in 
     interior shadow." ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-16 UT 18:11-19:03 Ill=88% Bailly observed by Miles_H on 1965-5-12

     On 1965 May 12 at UT 22:20 H. Miles (UK) found a possible 
     obscuration in Bailly crater. Most of the region was as sharp as 
     normal, but the central area was greyish and blurred. Although 
     the observer concerned considered themselves a non-experienced 
     observer, another BAA Lunar Section observer saw the same 
     effect. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-16 UT 18:11-18:40 Ill=88% Aristarchus observed by Moore_P on 1981-3-17

     Aristarchus 1981 Mar 17 UT 22:40-23:25 Observed by Moore 
     (Selsey, England, 15" reflector, seeing III) "Aristarchus very 
     bright according to Crater Extinction Device and a coloured 
     blink detected" BAA Lunar Section TLP report. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Feb-16 UT 18:13-20:11 Ill=88% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Gray_R on 2004-11-24

     Aristarchus Area 2004 Nov 22 UT 04:58-05:49 Observed by Gray 
     (Winemucca, NV, USA, 152mm f/9 refractor, seeing 4-5, trasparency 4-5, 
     x114, x228) "Blinked Herodotus with Wratten filters Blue 38A and Red 
     25. The illuminated west crater wall stood out brilliantly in blue 
     light, much more so than in white light. This was true also of 
     Aristarchus. Red light did not increase contrasts in Herodotus any more 
     than they were in white light. Shadows in Herodotus appeared as black 
     as the night west of the terminator and remained that way throughout 
     the observing period. No TLP seen in Herodotus tonight. A possible TLP 
     was seen to the west of Herodotus near the terminus of Schroters 
     Valley. It was noted at the beginning of the observing period that 
     there were four very bright spots of light, one near the end of 
     Schroters Valley, the other three grouped together a little farther 
     north. Although not far from the terminator they were definitely east 
     of it. It was noted that all of them nearly vanished in the Blue 38A 
     filter while Aristarchus and the rim of Herodotus gleamed brilliantly. 
     At 5:19UT it was noted that the most brilliant of the four lights, the 
     one near the terminus of Schroters Valley, had faded almost to 
     invisibility in white light. When first seen it had been brighter than 
     Aristarchus. It remained very dim after this through the remainder of 
     the observing period, and was unchanged at 7:35-7:49UT when I again 
     examined the area. The other three bright spots remained brilliant and 
     unchanged."


2019-Feb-16 UT 19:26-21:12 Ill=89% Aristarchus observed by Baumeister on 1973-8-10

     Aristarchus 1973 Aug 10 UTC 20:14 observed by Baumeister 
     (48.63N, 9.25E, 110mm reflector, T=2, S=2) "Orange to red 
     colours at the crater floor disappeared until 21:04" - 
     Hilbrecht and Kuveler, Earth, Moon & Planets, 30 (1984), 
     p53-61. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-16 UT 19:45-23:41 Ill=89% Encke_B observed by Blanco_J on 1990-9-1 *

     Blanco, J. Vidal, of Gijon, Spain (3" refractor x72)
     noticed an unfamiliar very bright center near to Encke. 
     Cameron suspects that this was Encke B crater
     on the basis that it is a prominent small crater
     near to Encke. Cameron 2006 catalog extension ID=410
     and weight=2. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-16 UT 20:02-21:48 Ill=89% Plato observed by Robinson_JH on 1973-8-10

     Plato 1973 Aug 10 UT 22:45 observed by Robinson (Devon, UK). 
     Observer noticed that the lighter areas on the floor were more 
     distinct in red than in the blue filter. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-16 UT 20:29-22:12 Ill=89% Proclus observed by Farrant_M on 1972-12-17

     Proclus 1972 Dec 17 UTC 18:30 Observed by Farrant (Cambridge, England, 
     8.5" reflector) "Crater appeared very bright (Apollo 17 Watch)." NASA 
     catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #1359.


2019-Feb-16 UT 20:31-21:43 Ill=89% Herodotus observed by Hill_H on 1966-11-24

     Herodotus 1966 Nov 24 UT 21:50 H.Hill (UK, 7.25" reflector, 
     x240), seeing 4-6/10, transparancy 4/5) sketched a central white 
     diffuse patch inside the floor of the crater, with a size of 
     about 1/7th the diameter of the crater. The eastern edge of the 
     white patch was encroached by the shadow of the eastern rim. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-16 UT 20:43-21:52 Ill=89% Proclus observed by Bartlett on 1976-9-6

     Proclus 1976 Sep 06 UT 02:00 Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA, 
     4.5" reflector 45-300x, S=3, T=5) "Nothing vis. on floor of 2deg 
     brightness. Usually floor ray & Proc. A are vis. at this col. & c.p. is 
     5 deg bright. (must have been 2 deg tonite)." NASA catalog weight=4. 
     NASA catalog ID #1450.


2019-Feb-16 UT 20:44-21:46 Ill=89% Torricelli_B observed by Cook_MC on 1983-4-24

     All observers saw a blue tinge seen inside and outside the 
     crater. Marshall observed a bright spot in the middle of 
     the crater floor and thought perhaps that it was a central
     peak. No central peak can be found on Lunar Orbiter images.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=214 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA
     weight=4.


2019-Feb-16 UT 21:05-21:47 Ill=89% Aristarchus observed by Budine on 1964-2-25

     Cobra Head, Aristarchus 1964 Feb 25 UT 02:37-02:38, 02:39-02:42 
     Observed by Budine (Binghamton, New York, USA, 4" refractor, x250, S=6, 
     T=4) "Red flashes" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #
     802.


2019-Feb-16 UT 23:16-01:05 Ill=89% Herodotus observed by Bartlett on 1949-11-3

     In 1949 Nov 03 UT 01:06 J.Bartlett (3.5" refractor, x100) noted that 
     the floor of Herodotus was very dark, the east wall was very bright, 
     and the floor contained a central bright peak. The BAA/ALPO weight=3.


2019-Feb-16 UT 23:23-00:00 Ill=89% Daniell observed by Crick on 1979-7-6

     Crick of Belgium noticed obscuration on a bright spot on
     the south east wall. This spot was quite prominent through a red 
     Wratten 25 filter. The floor was very dark. Other craters
     were checked and were normal. A sketch was supplied and the position 
     was the same as in other earlier reports. Cameron 2006 catalog 
     extension ID=60 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=3. 6" reflector 
     used. Seeing=II and transparency=good.


2019-Feb-16 UT 23:29-00:37 Ill=89% Plato observed by Cook_MC on 1987-2-10

     M. Cook of Frimley, "NE ray distinct & also floor E of
     it, not distinct as on Dec 13 & Jan 11, while March 10,
     11 & 12 seen by Price, North, Peters, Foley & M Cook, where
     rim was clear and sharp." - quote from the 2006 Cameron Catalog
     extyension - TLP ID=297 and weight=5. Cameron gives the
     observers confirming this TLP as: M. Cook, G. North and Davies..
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-16 UT 23:49-01:31 Ill=90% Aristillus observed by Berger on 1972-12-17

     Aristillus 1972 Dec 17 UTC 21:50-22:20 observed by Berger (51.5N, 9E, 
     60mm refractor, T=2, S=3) "Diffuse bright cloud in the NE corner of the 
     crater" - Hilbrecht and Kuveler, Earth, Moon & Planets, 30 (1984), p53-
     61.


2019-Feb-17 UT 00:10-01:16 Ill=90% Kepler observed by Lugo on 1954-11-7

     Kepler 1954 Nov 07 UTC 23:20 Observed by Lugo (Caracus, Venezula) 
     "Luminous pts. (MBMW say "bright pt.; just outside E.wall).
     NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #580.


2019-Feb-17 UT 00:50-01:50 Ill=90% Aristarchus observed by Lapshin on 1919-6-10

     Aristarchus 1919 Jun 10 UT 19:00-19:30 Observed by Lapshin 
     (Russia) a "Greenish-yellow light shone from inside the crater 
     for 1/2 hr. after which it returned to normal. Violet tint on W. 
     bank & surrounding area & the dark color of the saddle & dark 
     spot were distinct. Term. slightly E. of Herodotus. (Ast. E)=IAU 
     W." NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #372. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2019-Feb-17 UT 01:54-03:45 Ill=90% Plato observed by Fauth on 1906-3-7

     Plato 1906 Mar 07 UT 22:00? Observed by Fauth (Germany? 6" refractor) 
     "Color (brightness?) greatly enhanced as on the previous nite" NASA 
     catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #324.


2019-Feb-17 UT 03:30-03:45 Ill=90% Tycho observed by Moore_P on 1980-7-24

     On 1980 Jul 24 at UT22:10-22:55 P. Moore (Selsey, UK, 15" reflector, 
     x360 and x400) found an area just south east of the central peak (and 
     upto the wall) to be quite dark in blue light, but normal brightness in 
     red light or in white light. All other features were normal colour-
     wise. At 22:55UT Tycho was normal again. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=103 
     and weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-17 UT 03:34-03:45 Ill=90% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1984-1-15

     Foley (Kent, UK) saw the west wall dull and stongly coloured. Moore 
     (Sussex, UK) saw the wall as normal. However Cameron points out that 
     Foley (Kent, UK) is a lot more Blue/UV sensitive than Moore. Mosely 
     (Covington, UK) at 22:10 UT noticed a brightening on the East wall and 
     at 01:10-01:25 UT suspected that the interior had a weak yellow-green 
     cast to it. Cook (Frimley, UK) states that orange colour was within the
     interior crater, but green beyond the east rim at the 9 O'Clock and
     the south east corner to floor blue/mauvre beyond the northern rim 
     NW/WSW. Foley sstates that orange and blue/mauvre might be spurious 
     colour, but green one cannot get this way. Cameon suggests chromatic 
     aberatons as a possibility but thinks that the observers concerned were 
     experienced enough to recognize this if it were the cause. Cameron 2006 
     catalog extension ID=239 and weight=0. Moore used a 15?" refletor and 
     Foley used a 12" refletor. Mosely experienced II seeing and good 
     transparency. Cook had III seeing and also good transparency. P. 
     Grego made an observation this night too. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-17 UT 18:12-18:13 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Amery_GW on 1978-4-20

     Amery (Reading, England) saw blue in Aristarchus but a photograph did 
     not show the colour. Foley thinks this was spurious colour. Cameron 
     2006 extension catalog ID=27. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-17 UT 18:12-18:13 Ill=95% Promontorium_Laplace observed by Foley_PW on 1978-4-20

     Peter Foley observed a tiny yellow-brown region close
     to the tip of the cape, north east of the precipitous west
     edge, in the face of the north facing slope. The area
     concerned was diffuse and varied in density despite
     the surroundings not varying. Foley notcied no colour
     elsewhere on the Moon, though Amery thought that he saw
     some in Aristarchus, but Foley thinks this was spurious.
     Cameron 2006 catalog extension ID=27 and weight=5.
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-17 UT 18:12-18:16 Ill=95% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Darling_D on 1991-8-23

     Flashing spot at end of SV fluctuated. Herzog, Darling &
     Weier confirmed spot but not fluctuation. Spot brighter in red
     than blue, but Cobra Head was bright in blue. No other region was 
     abnormal.


2019-Feb-17 UT 19:44-21:33 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Cross on 1967-11-15

     Aristarchus-Cobra Head, 1967 Nov 15 UT 05:40-06:00 Observed by Cross, 
     Tombaugh (Las Cruces, NM, 12" reflector x800) and Harris (Tucson, AZ), 
     and Dunlap (Organ Pass, NM, 24" reflector with Moonblink). "Obs. 
     reddish color N. & E. of Aris. & more intense color nr. E.(IAU?) rim of 
     Cobra Head. Red color nr.C.H. confirmed by Tombaugh. Obtained 10 photos 
     between 0543-0549h in 3 spectral bands (blue, yellow, red, & integ. 
     light). No change dur. obs. per. but spot got smaller at moments of 
     good seeing. Isodensitometry of photos. At Corralitos 0152-0155 on 24-
     in image intensifier & filter sys. photoos at 0320-0330h. Harris at 
     Tucson got spectra. Neither of latter 2 show anything unusual. Its 
     edges were nebulous even at best seeing. Size @ that of Cobra's Head." 
     NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA catalog ID #1053.


2019-Feb-17 UT 19:56-21:54 Ill=95% Plato observed by Foley_PW on 1978-8-16

     Peter Foley (Kent, UK, 8" reflector, seeing=II) noticed that
     the floor beneath the north wall, and the area over the north
     wall were indistinct (almost out of focus). Despite looking
     elsewhere in the crater and surrounds, no other blurring
     (obscuration of detail) could be seen, indeed everywhere else
     was sharp and detailed. Foley tried several eyepieces but this
     made no difference. He used a crater extinction device but
     found no variations in brightness. There was a slight
     darkening when he used a red filter in the Moon Blink device.
     The obscuration effect weakened between UT20:56 and 21:10,
     was difficult to see at 21:13 and had finished by 00:15.
     Patrick Moore (12" reflector, Dublin, Ireland) saw nothing 
     unusual when he started observing at UT 22:00. Cameron says 
     "Photos marked at location of phenomenon". Cameron 2006 
     extension catalog ID=37 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-17 UT 21:19-23:10 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1979-8-6

     Aristarchus normal in red and blue filters however the
     Cobra Head part of Schroter's Valley was brighter in blue.
     Indeed it was very dull in red - Louderback says that this
     was not surprising as the whole areas around Aristarchus is
     brighter in blue. Louderback is an experienced observer
     of the Aristarchus area of more than 10 years. Cameron 2006
     extended catalogID=63 and weight=1. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-17 UT 21:36-22:30 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1985-12-25

     Louderback observed that the south west wall was a creamy deep yellow.
     There was also strong fluorescent blue on the west wall of the Cobra
     Head - Schroter's Valley area and this was similar to the violet glare
     seen on Aristarchus at times. Violet was seen between Aristarchus and
     the Cobra Head. Seeing coditions were poor. Brightening of a point
     near C occurred roughly every 10-15 seconds and lasted 0.5 sec -
     (Cameron concludes that this was not due to the Earth's atmosphere).
     A 0.2 step drop in brightness was seen on point A (twin spots).
     Point C had reduced by 0.6 steps. Elsewhere was stable in brightness.
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=281 and weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-17 UT 23:20-01:17 Ill=96% Plato observed by Schmidt_J on 1873-4-10

     Plato 1873 Apr 10 UTC 21:00? Observed by Schmidt (Athens, Greece, 6" 
     refractor) "Under high sun, 2 faint clouds in E. part of crater."


2019-Feb-18 UT 01:12-01:46 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1975-9-18

     Aristarchus 1975 Sep 18 UT 21:00? Observed by Foley (Kent, 
     England, 12" reflector) "Deep blue-viol. spot in NW (IAU?) 
     interior corner." NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1414. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-18 UT 03:26-04:24 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Cook_AC on 1989-10-13

     Aristarchus 1989 Oct 13 UTC 21:00 Observed by Cook (Frimley, Surrey, 
     UK, 20cm reflector (visual and video)) "Aristarchus had what appeared 
     to be a outline of a ghost crater on it's eastern side - quite large 
     and bright". Cameron 2006 extended catalog TLP ID No=378 and weight=5.
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-18 UT 03:50-04:42 Ill=96% Gassendi observed by Moore_P on 1976-10-6

     Gassendi 1976 Oct 04 UT 21:30 P. Moore (Selsey, UK, x400, 
     seeing poor) observed redness in the c.p. area. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Feb-18 UT 04:08-04:42 Ill=96% Plato observed by Amery_GW on 1981-6-15

     Plato 1981 Jun 15 UTC 21:30 Observed by Amery (Reading, England, 25cm 
     reflector, seeing Antoniadi IV-V) At the 4 O'Clock position on the 
     North West corner?, there was a dark smudge which reached from the 
     floor across and over the wall and onto the terrain outside the crater. 
     Foley, alerted by Amery, saw a dark show-like patch in the crater's 
     north west corner, again lying across the rim. 2006 Cameron catalog 
     extension ID=148 and weight=4. Foley used a 12" reflector and seeing 
     was III-V. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-18 UT 04:19-04:42 Ill=96% Plato observed by Pratt_H on 1870-5-13

     Plato 1870 May 13 UT 22:00? Observed by Pratt (---), Elger (Liverpool, 
     England), (Gledhill (Brighton, England) "Extraordinary display of 
     lights. 27 seen by Pratt, 28 by Elger, only 4 by Gledhill. (independ. 
     confirm. ?" NASA catalog weight=5 (very good) NASA catalog ID #168.
     A bit more of a detailed report is as follows: "Upon the 13th of May, 
     1870, there was an "extraordinary display," according to Birt: 27 
     lights were seen by Pratt, and 28 by Elger, but only 4 by Gledhill, in 
     Brighton. Atmospheric conditions may have made this difference, or the 
     lights may have run up and down a scale from 4 to 28. As to 
     independence of sunlight, Pratt says (Rept. B.A., 1871-88), at to this 
     display, that only the fixed, charted points so shone, and that other 
     parts of the crater were not illuminated, as they would have been to an 
     incidence common throughout.(30) In Pratt's opinion, and, I think, in 
     the opinion of the other observers, these lights were volcanic." 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Feb-18 UT 18:13-18:18 Ill=99% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Pickering_WH on 1892-5-10 *

     On 1892 May 10th at 19:00UT? Pickering, based at Arequipa. Peru, using 
     a 12" reflector, saw varitions in vapor col. Drawings were made. Time 
     calculated from the given colongitude. Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and 
     weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-18 UT 18:58-19:48 Ill=99% Plato observed by Haas_W on 1937-7-22

     Plato 1937 Jul 22 UT 06:20 Observed by Haas (Alliance, Ohio, 
     USA, 12" reflector?) "Floor distinctly greenish, but was gray on 
     June 23, 1937 at 0430 & col.84 (normal?)" NASA catalog weight=4 
     (high). NASA catalog ID #421. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-18 UT 19:14-21:09 Ill=99% Plato observed by Chapman on 1982-6-5

     On 1982 Jun 05 at 22:00? UT, Chapman (UK, using a 12" reflector), again 
     using a x2 yellow filter, noticed that the central craterlet 
     detectabilty changed such that sometimes it was visible and sometimes 
     not. Foley (Kent, UK)noticed that the central craterlet could only just 
     be seen between June 2 to June 5 and was much less discernable than 
     during the previous lunation. No CED brightness measurements made. The 
     floor of Plato was noted to be very dark though. Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=172 and weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-18 UT 20:57-22:25 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Weresuik on 1965-5-15

     Aristarchus 1965 May 15 UTC 01:40-02:15 Observed by Weresuik, McClench, 
     Johnson (Pt. Tobacco, MD, USA, 16" reflector x240, S=F, T=G) and Delano 
     (Massachusetts, USA, 12" reflector). "Crater had color(red?) detected 
     by Trident MB & photos were obtained. There were pulsations. Delano saw 
     E. wall of crater unusually bright (confirm. if at same time)." NASA 
     catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA catalog ID #876.


2019-Feb-18 UT 21:28-23:26 Ill=99% Bailly observed by Lord_CJR on 1974-10-29

     Bailly 1974 Oct 29 22:00-23:00 Observed by Lord (St Annes-on-
     Sea, UK), 25cm reflector, x125 & x400,seeing III, transparency 
     5/5. South west floor was darker in a blue filter than in 
     other filters. Observer thought this was due to a natural 
     green colour  here. Had seen this on 3 other occasions under 
     early morning illumination. ALPO/BAA weight=1,


2019-Feb-18 UT 23:11-00:43 Ill=99% Eratosthenes observed by Bartlett on 1976-9-8

     Eratosthenes 1976 Sep 08 UTC 04:29 Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, 
     USA, 4.5" reflector 45-225x, S=5-4, T=5) "Psuedo-shadow X3 was present 
     but X disappeared from wall(same intensity?) which was rated 4 deg. 
     Disappearance of X so unexpected that he examined inner S wall very 
     carefully & was certain it was free from psuedo-shad. Had vanished 
     within 24h. Other pseudo-shadows showed no change. X reappeared next 
     nite. (X must have been 4deg; &this is much higher than any other 
     meas.). Variability of wall shadows may habe been what Pickering saw, 
     suggests Bartlett." Cameron 1978 TLP catalog weight=4 and catalog ID
     1452. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-18 UT 23:55-01:09 Ill=99% Madler observed by Haas_W on 1940-9-16

     Madler 1940 Sep 16 UT 02:10 Observed by Haas (New Mexico? USA, 
     12"  reflector?) "Bright spot on S. rim was I=5.8 comp. with 8.9 
     on Aug 17 (see #470)." NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID #
     473. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-19 UT 05:07-05:32 Ill=100% Unknown observed by Scarfe on 1964-1-28

     On 1964 Jan 28 at 21:00? Scarfe (UK) obtained spactra showing 
     luminescence? The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=798 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-19 UT 20:11-20:45 Ill=100% Plato observed by Livesey_R on 1973-8-13

     Plato 1973 Aug 13 UT 22:25-22:35 observed by Pedler (Devon, UK). 
     Observer noticed a slight blink on a lighter patch on the floor 
     just beneath the south(?) rim using Moon blink filters. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-19 UT 21:05-22:09 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Darling_D on 1989-10-15

     David Darling observed bright glittering on Aristarchus. This
     was followed by a flare up in brightness at 00:38:05 UT in the
     comet-like ray area of the crater equivalent in intensity to the
     central peak. Then he saw another one on the north east rim of 
     Aristarchus of the same brightness. A third flare was seen at
     00:49UT in south of Herodotus, on the comet-like ray. Another
     two flares were observed at 00:56UT on the north west rim of
     Aristarchus. Darling suspects that these effects were due
     to seeing effects and Cameron agrees. However Weier suspects
     that they were TLP? Brightness measurements by Weier were for
     the south west rim of Herodotus 8.0, for a spot at the Cobra's
     Head 9.0 and 7.5 for C.H. Cameron apparently did not see the flashes
     but did suspect that the interior of Aristarchus was a bit unusual. 
     Don Spain did not see anything unsual at all. Cameron 2006 extended
     catalog ID=380 and the observation weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2019-Feb-19 UT 21:32-22:41 Ill=100% Herodotus observed by Kilburn_K on 1971-12-2

     Herodotus 1971 Dec 02 UT 20:40 Observed by Kilburn 
     (Manchester, UK, 8" refractor, x130, Transparency very good 
     with a thin mist, seeing excellent, x130). Bright point 
     (considerably brighter than its surroundings) was seen on the 
     SE of the illuminated floor of Herodotus in white light. It 
     was quite close to the crater rim. The spot had no colour. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-19 UT 22:08-23:10 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Farrant_M on 1967-12-16

     Aristarchus 1967 Dec 16 UTC 22:00? Observed by Farrant (Cambridge, 
     England, 8" reflector) "Crater took on an unusual appearance on inner 
     NE (ast. ?) wall. Showed a very pale blue & the opposite wall a pale 
     red color seen in no other features. Lasted only 10m & survived a 
     change of eyepieces." Seeing=I (Antoniadi). NASA catalof weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #1056.


2019-Feb-19 UT 22:09-00:05 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Coates_J on 1978-8-18

     On 1978 Aug 18 at UT 22:00 Coates (England?, UK, 3" refractor, 
     seeing=II) found that the inner bands of Aristarchus were hard to see, 
     this was odd because the seeing conditions were good and he usually 
     sees them? However he did not believe that there was any obscuration 
     going on. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=37 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Feb-19 UT 23:36-00:23 Ill=100% Moon observed by deMoraes on 1893-4-1

     On 1893 Apr 01 at UT 22:00 deMoraes of the Azores, Portugal, saw a 
     shaft of light projecting from the Moon. Cameron 1978 catalog ID=280 
     and weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-20 UT 01:46-03:32 Ill=100% Manilius observed by Firsoff on 1955-8-3

     Manillus 1955 Aug 03 UTC 21:00 Observed by Firsoff (Sommerset, England, 
     6.5" reflector, x200) "Maniluus very bright in all colors, especially 
     blue, extraordinarily so" NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID 
     #602.


2019-Feb-20 UT 01:46-03:32 Ill=100% Timocharis observed by Firsoff on 1955-8-3

     Timocharis 1955 Aug 03 UTC 21:00 Observed by Firsoff (Sommerset, 
     England, 6.5" reflector, x200) "Crater was bright in blue, seemed large 
     & diffused." NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #602.


2019-Feb-20 UT 02:55-04:51 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Porter on 1978-8-19

     On 1978 Aug 19 at UT02:45-04:00 Porter (Naragansetts, RI, USA, using a 
     6" reflector, Seing = 6/10) noticed blue on the north east corner of 
     Aristarchus and an orange glow on the south east wall. They detected no 
     movement or change in brightness. The observer used both eyes, to make 
     sure it was not an eye defect, and three filters: red Wratten 25, blue 
     Wratten 82 and Violet Wratten 47. Porter found that the colours faded 
     for a duration of 5 minutes and then returned. Their right eye gave a 
     good view and using their left eye they suspected that it was 0.5 steps 
     brighter than the remainder of the crater. The suspected colour 
     remained visible, even under moments of good seeing conditions. The 
     colour eventually faded over time and was eventually gone. Porter 
     reportd seein gcolour here on the following night. Apparently other 
     bright spots showed no colour. Fitton suggests that the filters used 
     confirm that the south east wass was definitely red in colour. The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=37 and the weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-20 UT 03:58-05:52 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Coates_J on 1973-11-10

     Aristarchus 1973 Nov 10 UTC 20:00? Observed by Coates (England, 8" 
     reflector x200, Moon at gigh altitude above horizon). "Attracted to 
     crater because of an orange hue extending towards Herod. Has seen this 
     at other times. Thinks not a LTP, but actual color on ground."NASA 
     catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #1381.


2019-Feb-20 UT 04:00-07:26 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1954-11-11 *

     Observed by Bartlett (Batimore, MD, USA, S=4, T=5) "E.wall? blue 
     glare. He was uncertain @it. Couln't focus it. Herodotus 
     unaffected." NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID 581. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-20 UT 05:32-06:16 Ill=99% Picard observed by Ingall on 1865-9-5

     Conspicuous bright spot seen on 6th. Also seen on 7th, absent on 8th.
     Cloud-like effect where light had been (on 8th). Cameron 1978 catalog
     TLP ID No.=139 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-21 UT 00:50-02:25 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1992-7-16

     On 1992 Jul 16 at UT 03:32-09:31 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     3" refractor, x134) detected yellow on the southern rim of Aristarchus, 
     and the colour looked "darker" through a yellow filter and the region 
     was "duller" than normal. The region was 1 intesnsity step brighter on 
     the 2nd measurement, "on all points in it". The comet tail-like ray had 
     3 sections and was "mottled" in appearance. Finally the Cobra Head 
     region had possible variations in brightness. The cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=451 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.  


2019-Feb-21 UT 02:11-03:02 Ill=97% Copernicus observed by Robinson_JH on 1975-7-24

     Copernicus 1975 Jul 24 UT 22:52 Observed by Robinson (Teignmouth, 
     England, 10" ? reflector or 4" refractor?) "Copernicus indistinct in 
     red and blue filters" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID 
     #1409.


2019-Feb-21 UT 02:11-03:02 Ill=97% Fracastorius observed by Robinson_JH on 1975-7-24

     Fracastorius 1975 Jul 24 UT 22:52 Observed by Robinson (Teignmouth, 
     England, 10" ? reflector or 4" refractor?) "Fracastorius had a blink 
     (red or blue?)" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1409.


2019-Feb-21 UT 02:11-03:02 Ill=97% Tycho observed by Robinson_JH on 1975-7-24

     Tycho 1975 Jul 24 UT 22:52 Observed by Robinson (Teignmouth, England, 
     10" ? reflector or 4" refractor?) "Tycho indistinct in red and blue 
     filters" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1409.


2019-Feb-21 UT 02:51-04:37 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1954-11-12

     Aristarchus 1954 Nov 12 UTC 02:20-03:05 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, S=5-6, T=3-4) "Blue-violet glare on EWBS & 
     whole length of E. wall. Suspected viol. tint on VA; uncertain @ 
     m" NASA catalog weight=4. This had faded later by 05:07. NASA 
     catalog ID #582. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-21 UT 03:26-04:28 Ill=97% Promontorium_Agarum observed by Moore_P on 1996-7-31

     On 1996 Jul 31 at 22:40UT P. Moore (Selsey, UK, 15" reflector, x300) 
     noticed a lack of detail in the Cape Agarum area - he would normally 
     have expected to have seen some craterlets. However he would not rate 
     this observation much because the seeing was only III and he does not 
     think that it was an obscuration. However just in case he wanted to 
     record this report in the archives. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-21 UT 04:37-06:33 Ill=96% Proclus observed by Savill_AM on 1973-11-11

     Proclus 1973 Nov 11 UT 20:40-23:05 Observed by Savill 
     (Cambridge, England, 12" refractor, x100?), Young (Yorks, 
     England), Pedler (Bristol, England, 6" reflector?), Livesey 
     (Scotland). "At 100x showed a bright spot in S.part of crater. 
     At 300x was vis. but power too high. In 8-in refr. at 170x, at 
     2055h 2 spots present. Confirmed by Young. Seeing was 
     improving. At 2104h in 12-in refr. at 260x the lower spot 
     seemed distinctly enlarged & vaporous. Decided it was due to 
     poor seeing. Later the 2 spots were better defined & separated 
     but lower moved away fr. larger one & they seemed more 
     separated than earlier. Obs. ended at 2305h when they decided 
     it was not an LTP. but was 2 craters instead of humps. There 
     were neg. repts. from others at the same time. (there are no 
     craters in Proclus)." NASA catalog weight=2. NASA catalog ID #
     1382. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-21 UT 05:04-06:53 Ill=96% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Gruithuisen_F on 1824-11-8

     Schroter's Valley: Cobra Head 1824 Nov 08 UTC 00:00? Observed by 
     Gruithuisen (Munich, Germany) "Mingling of all colors in small spots. 
     Described a violet glimmer near Cobra Head & plateau that spreads; 
     starts just after sunrise. Cameron 1978 catalog weight=4 and catalog 
     ID=103. The ALPO/BAA catalog weight=3.


2019-Feb-21 UT 05:36-06:54 Ill=96% Picard observed by Ingall on 1865-9-6

     Conspicuous bright spot seen on 6th. Also seen on 7th, absent on 8th.
     Cloud-like effect where light had been (on 8th). Cameron 1978 catalog
     TLP ID No.=139 and weight=3.


2019-Feb-21 UT 05:58-06:54 Ill=96% Plato observed by Gledhill on 1870-3-18

     Plato 1870 Mar 19 UT 00:00? Observed by Gledhill? (halifax, England, 
     9" refractor) "Same group (of craters) as in Feb. illuminated. (if 
     phase same as Apr. 1970 then date is Mar 19" NASA catalog weight=2 
     (low). NASA catalog ID #165.


2019-Feb-21 UT 22:38-23:02 Ill=92% Plato observed by Haas_W on 1938-6-15

     Plato 1938 Jun 15 UTC 08:00 Observed by Haas? (New Mexico?, 12?" 
     reflector) "NW. end of floor had intensity I=2.0, but on 7/15/38, I=
     3.7, conditions similar." NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID 
     #439.


2019-Feb-21 UT 22:38-23:11 Ill=92% Plato observed by Taylor_DB on 1971-12-4

     Plato 1971 Dec 05 UT21:00-21:10 D.B.Taylor (Dundee, UK, 10" 
     refractor, conditions poor and turbulent). Observer suspected 
     colour orange colour near bright spot on north wall. Observation 
     ceased due to being clouded out. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-21 UT 23:16-23:39 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Corralitos on 1968-12-7

     Aristarchus 1968 Dec 07 UT 07:00? observed by Corralitos Observatory 
     (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector+Moon Blink) "Bluing around 3 
     craters, strongest at Aris. Lasted several days. Photos show 30% more 
     intensity in blue filter than in red or neutral. Moon's declination 
     northerly. Obs. think it was due to atm. effects" NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very high). NASA catalog ID #1105.


2019-Feb-21 UT 23:16-23:39 Ill=92% Kepler observed by Corralitos on 1968-12-7

     On 1968 Dec 07 at UT 07:00? Corralitos Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, 
     USA, 24" reflector and Moon Blink device) observed a bluing around 
     three craters, one of which was Kepler. This effect lasted several 
     days. Photographs were taken that show30% more intensity in the blue 
     filter than in red or neutral. The Moon's decination was northerly. The 
     observers suspect that it was an atmospheric efect and not a TLP. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1105 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-21 UT 23:56-01:22 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Pedler_J on 1990-1-13

     On 1990 Jan 13 at UT 22:15-23:05 J. Pedler (Bristol, UK, seeing=III and 
     transparency=excellent, no spurious colour) detected a blue region on 
     the north of Aristarchus, varying in sharpness/diffuseness. The crater 
     rim in this region could not be descerned. Eleswhere the crater rim was 
     normal as too were other features. When a Moon blink device was used, 
     no colour blink was detected, however through the blue filter the 
     suspected area was bright and the crater rim indistinct. Whereas 
     through the red filter the area looked perfectly normal. At 22:30UT the 
     effect had vanished and everywhere was normal. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=388 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-22 UT 01:58-03:24 Ill=91% Proclus observed by Bartlett on 1956-7-25

     Proclus 1956 Jul 25 UTC 06:16-06:33 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 5" reflector, x180, S=3-5, T=4) "C.p. 
     distinctly vis. within floor shadeo, est. 5 deg bright but no 
     trace of it at col. 122.37deg in Oct, '55(Oct. 4?)." NASA 
     catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #645. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Feb-22 UT 02:08-04:04 Ill=91% Mare_Crisium observed by Eysenhard on 1774-7-25

     Four bright spots seen in Mare Crisium. There was also peculiar 
     behaviour of the terminator. Source: Midlehurst 1968 catalog TLP ID=16. 
     Ref Web 1962 p62-76. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-22 UT 02:56-04:20 Ill=91% Aristarchus observed by Cook_MC on 1990-1-14

     On 1990 Jan 14 at UT 01:14-01:55 M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, seeing=poor) 
     observed that Aristarchus did not appear normal for this illumination. 
     the northern half of Aristarchus was "2x>" than the southern half of 
     the crater. There were two white patches of apron material near to the 
     crater Herodotus that were 50% of the brightness of the southern half 
     of Aristarchus. Furthermore the southern half of Aristarchus had a 
     circle - "dull patch on inner S wall with a bright point shining 
     through it. (Bartlett's EWBS?)". The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=389 and 
     the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-22 UT 05:41-07:23 Ill=90% Picard observed by Ingall on 1865-9-7

     Conspicuous bright spot seen on 6th. Also seen on 7th, absent on 8th.
     Cloud-like effect where light had been (on 8th). Cameron 1978 catalog
     TLP ID No.=139 and weight=3.


2019-Feb-22 UT 05:48-07:23 Ill=90% Daniell observed by Krieger on 1894-2-23

     Daniell 1894 Feb 23 UT 00:00? Observed by Krieger (Germany) 
     "Strong, brownish-red coppery hue." NASA catalog weight=4 and 
     catalog ID #281. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-22 UT 05:48-07:23 Ill=90% Posidonius observed by Krieger on 1894-2-23

     1894 Feb 23 UT 00:00(?) Posidonius N. Wall observed by 
     Krieger (Germany) "Strong, brownish-red coppery hue." NASA 
     catalog weight=4 and catalog ID #281. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-23 UT 03:51-04:38 Ill=83% Aristarchus observed by Kozyrev on 1955-10-4

     On 1955 Oct 04 UT 22:00 Dubois and Kozyrev (Crimea, Soviet Union, 
     50" reflector) observed the following in Aristarchus crater: "Low 
     disprsion (d=.13 whereas on Oct 28 & Nov d=0.03) Spectogram showing 
     emiss. in central part nr. H&K". Cameron says that this is a 
     confirmation of the previous Bartlett TLP? The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=
     619 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=5.


2019-Feb-24 UT 01:04-01:42 Ill=74% Aristillus observed by Haas_W on 1939-9-3

     Aristillus 1939 Sep 03 UT 05:00 Observed by Haas? (New 
     Mexico?) "Dark area in W. part of floor was I=4.0, comp. with 
     I=1.3, & I=3.7 (see #450, & #454). Used different telescope, 
     but can't explain diff. in albedo, since phase is similar in 2 
     & dist. from term. similar in all (normal?)." NASA catalog 
     weight=4. NASA catalog ID #459. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-24 UT 01:36-02:35 Ill=74% Aristillus observed by Haas_W on 1939-7-6

     Aristillus 1939 Jul 06 UT 05:00 Observed by Haas? (NM?, USA, 
     12" reflector?) "Dark area in W. part of floor was I=1.3 but 
     other dates were brighter. or same. yet cond. similar (see #
     454, 459 & 461)" NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID #450. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-24 UT 02:16-03:22 Ill=74% Fracastorius observed by Robinson_JH on 1975-7-27

     Fracastorius 1975 Jul 27 UT 22:45 Observed by Robinson (Teignmouth, 
     England) "Blink seen. Floor brighter in red than in blue. Suspects 
     colour is spurious". NASA catalog weight=1 (very low). NASA catalog ID 
     #1410.


2019-Feb-24 UT 02:16-03:22 Ill=74% Plato observed by Robinson_JH on 1975-7-27

     Plato 1975 Jul 27 UT 22:45 Observed by Robinson (Teignmouth, England) 
     "Blink seen. Floors brighter in red than in blue". NASA catalog weight=
     1 (very low). NASA catalog ID #1410.


2019-Feb-24 UT 02:16-03:22 Ill=74% Theophilus observed by Robinson_JH on 1975-7-27

     Theophilus 1975 Jul 27 UT 22:45 Observed by Robinson (Teignmouth, 
     England) "Blink seen. Floor brighter in red than in blue". NASA catalog 
     weight=1 (very low). NASa catalog ID #1410.


2019-Feb-24 UT 02:26-03:19 Ill=74% Aristarchus observed by Dachille on 1957-10-13

     Observed by Dachille & daughter (Univ. Park, Pennsylvania, 10.5"
     reflector, x75) "Flash -- then a brownish - red color patch. Alt. @
     20deg. (MBMW has Oct. 12, but is 13th UT)". NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very good). NASA catalog ID #674.


2019-Feb-24 UT 02:41-04:32 Ill=74% Puiseux observed by Madej_P on 1979-7-14

     On 1979 Jul 14 at UT 00:24-01:10 P. Madej (Huddersfield, UK, 15cm 
     reflector, x35, x52, x73 and x110, seeing IV-V, transparency very 
     good). Note that the observing date was also written as Jul 18th in the 
     original report? Puiseaux was very clear in white light, but could not 
     see the cenrtral peak. The central peak though was visible through a 
     Waretten 15 (yellow) filter. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-24 UT 04:57-06:55 Ill=73% Plato observed by Pickering_WH on 1904-8-1

     On 1904 Aug 01 at 05:00? Pickering (Echo Mt., CA, USA) UT Plato: 
     "Bright hazy obj., 2" diam. on floor, Obs before & after were normal". 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=318 and the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3. 


2019-Feb-24 UT 05:12-07:04 Ill=73% Messier_A observed by Moore_P on 1951-10-20

     Messier A 1951 Oct 20 UT 00:00? Observed by Moore (England) 
     "Brilliant white circular patch in it. has seen it & Messier 
     blurred several times." NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA 
     catalog ID #545 Note that the date and time given are probably 
     wrong as the Sun is ~7deg below the local horizon at this time. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1 to reflect this error.


2019-Feb-24 UT 06:29-07:18 Ill=73% Aristarchus observed by Haas_W on 1957-10-13

     Aristarchus 1957 Oct 13 UT 07:00?$ W.Haas, according to the 1978 
     NASA Catalog is supposed to have seen a bright spot of light -- 
     "explosion" in this crater. Confirmation of activity
     in Aristarchus - Three independent observations within 4 hours.
     Cameron 1978 catalog weight=5 and TLP ID No.=676. Private
     comunication with Haas shows that he recorded nothing unusual
     on the 12th or 13th. Therefore an ALPO/BAA weight of 1 has
     been given until this matter is cleared up.


2019-Feb-25 UT 02:16-02:48 Ill=64% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1956-7-28

     Aristarchus 1956 Jul 28 UT 05:20-05:55 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 5" reflector, x180, S=5, T=4) "Vivid blue-
     viol. gl. on c.p., band across E. floor, & EWBS, E. & NE wall". 
     N.B. The effect had vanished by 07:20UT. NASA catalog weight=4. 
     NASA catalog ID 646. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-25 UT 03:35-04:45 Ill=63% E_Limb observed by Fraser on 1975-7-29

     On 1975 Jul 29 at UT 00:00 Fraser (England, 6" reflector, x70) and 
     Howick (England, 3.5" reflector) observed the occultation of 51 Pisc. 
     at emersion - Fraser saw a flash or spike of liht which proceeded 
     emersion of primary by 0.4sec. The 9.0 mag companion appeared some 
     moments later. Howick at 1 km away, with 3.5" reflector noted nothing 
     unusual. Cameron says that no 3rd companion is known. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=1411 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-25 UT 05:01-07:19 Ill=63% Calippus observed by Moore_P on 1952-9-9 *

     Callipus 1952 Sep 09 UT 21:00-21:20 Observed by Moore (England) 
     "Hazy broad line of light seen fr. NW wall to SE wall over shad. 
     floor. Gone next nite at 0120. He gave low wt. to obs. (sunlight 
     between peaks?)." NASA catalog weight=1. NASA catalog ID #553. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-25 UT 06:09-07:03 Ill=63% Aristarchus observed by Garbett_P on 1976-8-15

     Aristarchus 1976 Aug 15 UT 23:00-23:45 Observed by Garbott (2) 
     (Bedfordshire, England, 10" reflector x500, seeing Antoniadi I) 
     and by Moore (Sussex, England, 15" reflector, x360, seeing 
     Antoniadi IV) "Noted blue color on N. wall extending toward 
     Herod. Also saw orange color in S. region. Confirmed by father. 
     (similar to many of Bartlett's rept's.), More noted nothing 
     unusual at 2320h." NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID #1444. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-25 UT 06:43-07:19 Ill=62% Aristarchus observed by Stochard on 1862-11-12

     Stochard of Dublin, Ireland, saw naked eye at 10:30UT on
     1862 Nov 12 Aristarchus as extraordinarily bright as a bright
     spot on the Moon. This was seen in daylight with the waning
     crescent. Cameron 2006 extension catalog ID=6 and weight=3.
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Feb-25 UT 06:43-07:10 Ill=62% Cabeus observed by LCROSS on 2009-10-9

     On 2009 Oct 09 UT11:00-11:04 NASA's LCROSS upper centaur stage, 
     followed 4 min later by the observation spacecraft, is due to impact 
     into a the crater Cabeus in the hope of kicking up some dust and 
     possible frozen volatiles. Note that this description is intended for 
     observers on the date of impact and it is doubtful that any new
     science could be achieved by re-observing the same area months
     after the impact. If you are observing on the date of impact, then 
     please observe around 11:00-11:04UT and ignore the predicted times in 
     the headings. However this report is included as techniqcally
     if something is seen it is a TLP, albeit man-made! For those observing 
     on the date in question here are a few observing tips to maximize 
     the science of your observations: (1) If you are imaging, then please 
     try to obtain images before the impact because you can then subtract 
     these from images taken during the impact and hence show up faint 
     changes that you might normally miss. (2) If you have a spare scope and 
     camera,use this to observe through filters such as UBVR or I, or if you
     have narrow band interference filters, try observing in
     say Hydrogen Alpha, Methane, OH, or indeed any volatile that you 
     might expect to see in a comet (the main source of water at the poles).
     (3) Please try checking the area long after the impact, just in
     case other effects might trigger a TLP. (4) Please go to some trouble 
     to ensure accurate timings- these will be essential in order to 
     understand the sequence of events - assuming any are seen. Timings can 
     be obtained using a short wave radio or via a GPS. Note that you should 
     always use UT or UTC. (5) Please send any observations that you make 
     into the upload section of the LCROSS campaign observers web site. If 
     you belong to an astronomical society e.g. BAA or ALPO, then do please 
     send copies of your observations to the Lunar Sections of your society 
     or club. (6) Finally this desription will be updated a day or two after 
     the planned impact.


2019-Feb-25 UT 06:56-07:19 Ill=62% Cabeus observed by Grego_P on 2009-9-9

     On 2009 Sep 09 UT23:31:43 P.Grego (St Dennis, Cornwall, UK, seeing II-
     III) suspected a flash south of Cabeus, just beyond the terminator.
     It was not bright, and lasted a fraction of a second. Thinks it might
     have been illusory as he saw some fainter flashes (cosmic rays?) 
     during that nights observing session. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Feb-26 UT 03:40-05:04 Ill=53% Kepler observed by deBerard on 1966-12-4

     Kepler 1966 DEc 04 UTC 05:10 Observed by de Beraud (Flossmoore, 
     Ilinois, USA, 6" reflector, x360, S=G) "Saw a bright area thru. blue 
     filter but could not see it in red filter. Decided it was a bluish 
     phenomenon." NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1001.


2019-Feb-26 UT 06:41-07:09 Ill=52% Aristarchus observed by Cowan on 1974-9-8

     Aristarchus 1974 Sep 08 UT 04:45-06:30 Observed by Cowan and Johnson 
     (Dublin, TX, 8" reflector, x59, x152, S=7) "Saw a bright luminous, 
     blue, misty cloud on th NE rim. Obscur. for 1st hr. then gave way to 
     pink & features became vis. Cloud was tear-drop shape. No movement to 
     glow. Pink cloud glowed too. Very tenuous by 0130h. (Nakamura says 
     there were no seismic events within several hrs. of this time). Another 
     person saw it without being advised as the where it was." NASA catalog 
     weight=5. NASA catalog ID #1393. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Feb-27 UT 05:38-06:40 Ill=42% Wargentin observed by Gaudibert_CM on 1878-10-18

     On 1878 Oct 18 at UT 21:00? Gaudibert (France?, 4"refractor) observed 
     Webb's white spot on SW border of Wargentin to be brilliant, however 
     this had vanished by Oct 19. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=204 and the 
     weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-27 UT 06:34-07:16 Ill=42% Tycho observed by Carvalho_F on 2006-1-22

     Tycho 2006 Jan 22 UT 06:34-06:36 Observed by Fabio Carvalho 
     (Assis, Sao Paulo Brazil, 25cm f/6 Newtonian) "Green colouration 
     seen on a rim of Tycho, effect remained visible for only 2 
     minutes. Attempts to image it shortly afterwards failed as it 
     had finished by then" An REA-Brasil observational report. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-27 UT 04:34-06:47 Ill=42% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Feb-27 UT 06:59-07:16 Ill=42% Tycho observed by Cook_MC on 2009-9-11

     On 2009 Sep 11/12 UT23:28-00:00 M.C. Cook (Mundesley, UK, 90mm Questar,
     x80 and x190, seeing II and transparency moderate-poor) observed
     pink on the north west rim of Tycho and green-blue on the inner
     SW rim. No sign of colour elsewhere on the Moon except for the
     S-E rim of Plato that was red. The Moon was about 20 deg in altitude
     at the time. The effect had gone by the end of the observing period. 
     A simulation of spurious colour in different directions 
     was generated by the BAA Lunar Section and found to possibly account 
     for these colours, although there should have been some strong colours 
     seen elsewhere in Tycho and none were. The BAA/ALPO weight=2.


2019-Feb-28 UT 05:37-06:44 Ill=33% Wargentin observed by Gaudibert_CM on 1878-10-19

     On 1878 Oct 18 at UT 21:00? Gaudibert (France?, 4" refractor) observed 
     Webb's white spot on SW border of Wargentin that had been brilliant the 
     previous night, had completely vanished tonight. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=204 and the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Feb-28 UT 05:35-06:46 Ill=32% Earthshine: sporadic meteors