TLP Repeat Illumination/Libration and Earthshine predictions for: China - Hong_Kong



Ill is percentage illumination of the Moon
*Indicates a repeat illumination and libration event to within +/- 1 deg for both
A non-* indicates just repeat illumination to within +/-0.5 deg


2019-Oct-01 UT 10:09-10:44 Ill=10% Aristarchus observed by Classen on 1976-3-3

     On 1976 Mar 03 at UT 17:30-18:30 Classen? (Budapest, Hungary, 8" 
     refractor, 14" reflector) observed Aristarchus to have a point-like 
     brightness -- white. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1429 and weight=3. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-01 UT 10:35-10:46 Ill=10% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Oct-02 UT 10:08-11:11 Ill=18% Aristarchus observed by Cross on 1969-5-20

     On 1969 May 20 at UT 03:18-04:27 Cross (Las Cruces, NM, USA 6" 
     refractor), Olivarez (Spain?), Kohlenberger, Gibson, Miller, Duarte and 
     Harris (CA, USA) observed brightenings, pulsations, scintillations in 
     Aristarchus crater. Cameron says independent confirmation seen by 4 
     observers, 1-2 magnitude increases, ranged between 1-30sec. Most active 
     period was 03:18-03:20UT, 04:17-04:27UT (Las Cruces). Calkins (West 
     Covins, CA, USA) UT 03:40-04:25 saw one major brightening up 2 
     magnitudes above steady state lasting 0.2 to 1.5 sec and another slow 
     brightening lasting 5-10 seconds. Kelsey (CA, USA) saw at 03:43-03:48UT 
     some brightenings. These observations were made during the Apollo 10 
     watch. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1127 and 1128 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Oct-02 UT 10:08-10:22 Ill=18% Aristarchus observed by Celis on 1970-6-7

     On 1970 Jun 07 at UT 23:00-23:30 Celis et al. (Paso Hondo, Chile, 2.5" 
     refractor, seeing=good?) observed bluish star-like points in 
     Aristarchus that formed intermittently. The atmosphere was not 
     turbulent. Cameron comments that maybe this a confirmation of Bartha's 
     earlier TLP report?. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1259 and weight=3. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-02 UT 10:11-11:26 Ill=18% W_Limb observed by Harrison_H on 1877-6-14

     On 1877 Jun 14 at UT 20:00 Harrison (USA?) noted on the western limb 
     variations of brilliancy along the dark limb reembled light of a moving 
     mirror held to a strong light against shadow of a dark ha.. Faint 
     greenish-blue streamers resembling terr. aurora streamers. He thought 
     they were same cause on the Moon. The Cameron 1978 catalog weight=3 and 
     ID=192. 


2019-Oct-02 UT 10:23-11:26 Ill=18% Reiner observed by Bell on 1973-5-6

     On 1973 May 06 at Ut 04:48 Bell (Lodi, CA, USA, 8.5" reflector x142) 
     saw a slow brightness increase in Reiner to magnitude 6, when suddenly 
     in the north east (IAU?) quadrant of the floor there was a very bright 
     pin-point blue-white flash of magntude 2 for approximately 0.5seconds. 
     After this the bright glowing of the crater diminished over about 15-
     20 sec befofre returning to normal. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1366 
     and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-02 UT 10:29-11:26 Ill=18% Plato observed by Selivanov on 1919-3-5

     Plato 1919 Mar 05 UT 17:19:17:34 Observed by Selivanov, Tartakov 
     (Russia, 4" refractor? x150) "Crater seemed to be an intense green in 
     the background of Ashen light. Slightly to the left (east?) of it's 
     centre a bright spot that sparkled with a phosphor. light, lighting up 
     the whole crater so that its W. edge could be seen. Light did not 
     change for the whole time." NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog 
     ID #371.


2019-Oct-02 UT 10:32-11:26 Ill=18% Mare_Crisium observed by Prvost on 1972-3-18

     Mare Crisium 1972 Mar 18 UT 19:06-21:00 Obsevred by Prvost and Dorchain 
     (Belgium, 3.5" reflector, 168x and 336x) "at 1906h Pruvust rep'ted 2 
     pts. moving from Aout to Prom. Olivium. Minutes later, Dorchain saw a 
     new pt. Others saw nothing unusual fr. 1912-2100h (Fitton, Ash, Peters, 
     Watkins,et al in England - but this was later than the event)" NASA 
     catalog weight=2 (poor). NASA catalog ID #1325.


2019-Oct-02 UT 11:00-11:26 Ill=18% W_Limb observed by Johnson_LT on 1949-5-31

     In 1949 May 31 UT02:37 LT Johnson observed a flash near the W 
     limb of the Moon at the same latitude as Riccioli. No colour 
     seen, the magnitude was 9-10, and duration < 0.5 sec.  If there 
     was any motion then it must have been < 24 km. He wasn't looking 
     at it when it happened, so the motion aspect is uncertain. 
     Indeed he was not absolutely certain if it was on the limb, or 
     just inside or outside? The BAA/ALPO weight=1.


2019-Oct-02 UT 10:34-11:28 Ill=18% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Oct-03 UT 10:07-11:07 Ill=27% Aristarchus observed by Malakhov on 1939-2-23

     On 1939 Feb 23 at UT17:00 Malakhov, Filippoova (Russia) observed an 
     intensive luminescence in background of ashen light that had ceased in 
     March, in Aristarchus (confirmed of Andrenko - says Cameron). Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=446 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-03 UT 10:07-11:36 Ill=27% Aristarchus observed by Kohlenberger on 1969-5-21

     On 1969 May 21 at UT 03:40-04:25 Kohlenberger (Fullerton, CA, 12" 
     reflector), Harris, Miller (Torrence, CA, 12" reflector), Bell and 
     Calkins (Ojai, Duarts, CA, USA), Kelsey (West Covins, CA, Riverside, 
     CA, USA) observed scintillations in Aristarchus - Cameron says 
     independent observations?). Members of Astronet took part in this 
     observation. Kelsey saw a brightening but not on the order of seconds 
     as others reported. Cameron suspects an atmospheric effect and also 
     comments that this was during the Apollo 10 watch. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=1130 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-03 UT 10:07-10:55 Ill=27% Aristarchus observed by Celis on 1970-6-8

     On 1970 Jun 08/09 at UT 23:30-00:00 Celis (Quilpue, Chile, 3" 
     refractor, x60, seeing=good?) observed lots of activity in the 
     Aristarchus region - blue luminous star-like points, frequently 
     appearing. Cameron comments that maybe atmospheric effects. The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=1260 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-03 UT 10:31-11:52 Ill=27% Aristarchus observed by Gamma on 1881-2-3

     On 1881 May 04 UT 20:00 "Gamma" a psuedonym for an astronomer 
     (Germany?) observed Aristarchus to be be a very bright 8th magnitude 
     star with pulsations. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=221 and the weight=3. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-03 UT 12:01-12:10 Ill=28% Grimaldi observed by Harris on 1969-7-19

     On 1969 Jul 19 at UT 03:53-04:19 Harris (Torrence, CA, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector), Bell (Duarte, CA, USA, 4.5" reflector), and Miller (Ojai, 
     CA, USA). "Harris saw 20 brightenings or light flashes, lasting fr, 1/2 
     to 3s at 03:53:56 (1/2s), 03:54:19 (1s), 03:54:55 (2s), 03:55:06, 
     03:56:54, 03:56:56, 03:58:37, 03:59:58, 04:07:28, 04:15:00, 04:16:02, 
     04:16:45, 04:20:29, 04:21:14. First 4 were confirmed by Bell, Harris 
     also saw 100 mi(160km) long limb brightening (blue) between Aris & 
     Grimaldi, due W. of Aris., brighter than Aris. At 04:14 saw the 
     brightening 1/2 way between Aris. & Grim. as pinkish or orange. Miller 
     at 0417h saw a star-like pulse in W. (IAU?) rim of Grimaldi. (confirm. 
     of Harris'04:16:45 obs. ? Apollo 11 watch)." The Cameron 1978 catalog 
     ID=1161a and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-03 UT 12:01-12:10 Ill=28% W_Limb observed by Harris on 1969-7-19

     On 1969 Jul 19 at UT 03:53-04:19 Harris (Torrence, CA, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector), Bell (Duarte, CA, USA, 4.5" reflector), and Miller (Ojai, 
     CA, USA). "Harris saw 20 brightenings or light flashes, lasting fr, 1/2 
     to 3s at 03:53:56 (1/2s), 03:54:19 (1s), 03:54:55 (2s), 03:55:06, 
     03:56:54, 03:56:56, 03:58:37, 03:59:58, 04:07:28, 04:15:00, 04:16:02, 
     04:16:45, 04:20:29, 04:21:14. First 4 were confirmedby Bell, Harris 
     also saw 100 mi(160km) long limb brightening (blue) between Aris & 
     Grimaldi, due W. of Aris., brighter than Aris. At 04:14 saw the 
     brightening 1/2 way between Aris. & Grim. as pinkish or orange. Miller 
     at 0417h saw a star-like pulse in W. (IAU?) rim of Grimaldi. (confirm. 
     of Harris'04:16:45 obs. ? Apollo 11 watch)." The Cameron 1978 catalog 
     ID=1161a and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-03 UT 10:33-12:12 Ill=28% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Oct-03 UT 13:01-13:27 Ill=28% Janssen observed by Marshall_KP on 1983-9-11 *

     On 1983 Sep 11 at UT 23:52 K.P. Marshall (Columbia, 12" 
     reflector, x268, seeing II), whilst sketching the crater Janssen 
     noticed a tenuous red patch on the southern junction of the 
     valley which joins Fabricius to A. Nothing resembling this found 
     on nearby areas. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-04 UT 10:06-10:47 Ill=37% Jansen observed by Jean on 1969-7-20

     Jansen-Maskelyne 1969 Jul 20 UT 00:53-01:00 Observed by Jean and Collak 
     (Montreal, Canada, 4" refractor and 6" reflector) "Jean and Collack 
     noted obscur. between Jansen and Maskel. from term. No features 
     discernible here whereas Proc. & Theoph. were already vis." NASA 
     catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #1169.


2019-Oct-04 UT 10:06-10:47 Ill=37% Langrenus observed by McNamara on 1969-7-20

     Near Langrenus 1969 Jul 20 UT 00:53-01:00 Observed by McNamara (Canada, 
     6" reflector) "McNamara saw a flash nr. Lang. (meteor?) Apollo 11 
     watch)" NASA catalog weight=0 (very unreliable). NASA catalog ID #1169.


2019-Oct-04 UT 10:06-10:44 Ill=37% Aristarchus observed by Celis on 1970-6-9

     On 1970 Jun 09 at UT 23:15-23:30 Celis (Quilpue, Chile, 3" 
     refractor, x60, seeing=good) observed in the Aristarchus region: 
     "Brilliant blue star-like, uninterrupted. The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=1260 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-04 UT 10:06-11:05 Ill=37% Klein observed by Fitton on 1971-4-30

     Klein (in Albategnius) 1971 Apr 31 UT 21:30 - 1971 May 01 UT 
     00:00 Observed by Fitton (England, 8" reflector, x200, filters) 
     "Attention distracted from Ptolemaeus to Klein where floor was 
     not normal. It had a pink line at foot of inner N. wall which 
     was bright in sunlight. Pink extended from N. to W. pt. Floor in 
     NW quad. was reddish-brown. All similarly illum. craters were 
     examined & no trace. Klein shifted to all parts of lens but 
     color persisted, but could not be induced in other craters. At 
     2230h floor took on more color in NW. In filters floor detail 
     vis. in red, almost invis. in blue, c.p. barely vis. Color 
     bright in red, & black in blue filter. In white light looked 
     like atm. above surface. Ptol. was equal in red & blue, & also 
     other craters. All seemed normal again on May 2nd. (date in ref. 
     gives Apr 30, Moore gives Apr 31? Ap 30 wrong as feature not 
     illum on that date, not even illum. on 5/2/71!)" NASA catalog 
     weight=4. NASA catalog ID #1292. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-04 UT 10:07-12:01 Ill=37% Proclus observed by Marshall_KP on 1982-10-22

     On 1982 Oct 22 at UT23:45-00:10 K. Marshall (Medellin, Columbia) found 
     the W-NW rim of Proclus was both red and very bright, No similar colour 
     effect was seen elsewhere on the Moon. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=187 
     and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-04 UT 10:17-12:11 Ill=37% Posidonius observed by Marshall_KP on 1982-10-22

     On 1982 Oct 22 at UT23:55 K. Marshall (Medellin, Columbia) found 
     the NE cleft in Posidonius to be abnormally bright, much more so 
     than the walls of the crater. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-04 UT 10:19-12:14 Ill=37% W_Limb observed by Harrison_H on 1877-6-16

     On 1877 Jun 16 at UT 20:00 Harrison (USA?) noted on the western limb 
     variations of brilliancy along the dark limb reembled light of a moving 
     mirror held to a strong light against shadow of a dark ha.. Faint 
     greenish-blue streamers resembling terr. aurora streamers. He thought 
     they were same cause on the Moon. The effect was brighter two days 
     earlier. The Cameron 1978 catalog weight=3 and ID=192. 


2019-Oct-04 UT 10:24-12:15 Ill=37% Proclus observed by Cook_MC on 2009-3-31

     On 2009 Mar 31 at UT 19:26-19:50 Cook M.C. (Mundesley, UK, 90mm 
     Questar reflector, x130, seeing II-III, transparency poor to 
     moderate). The crater had it's north-east to west wall 
     illuminated and a central feature on the floor, faintly seen. The 
     crater itself though was much brighter in a red filter, bright in 
     a wellow filter, but dull in a blue filter. Possible variation 
     seen whilst using the red filter, but this may have been due to 
     haze. All other features behaved normally. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-04 UT 10:35-12:07 Ill=37% Aristarchus observed by Madej_P on 1984-9-30

     On 1984 Sep 30 at UT17:30-18:45 P. Madej (Huddersfield, UK, 83x, 
     seeing=I-II, transparency very good and no spurious colour) "Twilight 
     Earthsine at 1732, 83x light-darker blue by 1800. Looked like a star of 
     mag. 3-4 with no variations. Spot moved slightly from side to side, not 
     connected with alignment or optical. Luminescence may have expanded and 
     contracted, but not sure. Other regions in Earthsine not seen. 
     (Mobberley) saw Earthshine with naked eye. Aris seen before clouds 
     came. Earthsine > normal T=E. (Foley) took CED readings which confirm 
     the brilliance of it. No other features could be measured in 
     Earthshine."The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=250 and the weight=0. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-04 UT 10:38-12:28 Ill=37% Aristarchus observed by Harris on 1969-5-22

     On 1969 May 22 at UT04:28-05:06 Harris (Tucson, AZ, USA, 21" 
     reflector), Ricke (8" reflector), and Cameron (Greenbelt, MD, USA, 21" 
     reflector, x40 and x250) observed "Brightenings & pulsations. 1st per. 
     0428-0440h(R&H); then 0500(R). 3rd per. 0506h(H). Pulsations 
     intermittent & increase @ 1/2 mag. except 1 was 1-2 mag. greater. 
     (atmosp. ?). Cameron at 0130-0330 did not see Aris. in 12-in refl. at 
     40x or 250x, & saw nothing abnormal. (Apollo 10 watch)". The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=1133 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-04 UT 11:40-12:58 Ill=37% Burg observed by Moore_P on 1972-5-18

     Burg 1972 May 18 UT 20:50-21:45, 22:15-23:00 Observed by Moore 
     (Selsey, England, 12.5" reflector, x350, S=3-4), and Fitton 
     (Lancashire, England, 8.5" reflectpr, x200) "Suspected floor 
     brightening at 2050h with a luminous strip to the SW. Persisted 
     for sometime. Faded at 2110h & invis. at 2145h. Fitton from 
     2215h-2300h saw nothing unusual, (after event tho.)" NASA 
     catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1333. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-04 UT 12:08-12:58 Ill=38% Proclus observed by Gergoulis on 1969-7-20

     Proclus 1969 Jul 20 UT 03:55-04:15 Observed by Gergoulis, Morley, 
     Sevra, Skinner, and Naumann (Edinburg, TX, 17" reflector, x169) " Texas 
     group got a blink (red, Trident MB) on NW wall. Varied extremely. 
     Increased in brightness in red. Clouds stopped obs. 5 confirmed 
     visualy. (moon nr. horizon, Apollo 11 watch. No blink if spurious?)." 
     NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1170.


2019-Oct-04 UT 12:38-12:58 Ill=38% Aristarchus observed by Kozyrev on 1968-6-1

     On 1968 Jun 01 at UT 21:00? Kozyrev (Crimea?, Soviet Union)
     Gas luminescence seen in Aristarchus crater. The Cameron 1978 catalog 
     ID=1075 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-04 UT 10:32-13:00 Ill=38% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Oct-05 UT 10:05-10:35 Ill=47% Biela observed by Skinner on 1969-5-23

     Biela, Maskelyne 1969 May 23 UTC 02:32-03:00 Observed by 
     Skinner, Perez, Barry, Bernie, Madison (Edinburgh, TX, USA) 
     described in NASA catalog as: "Bright W.rim & 2 spots on N. 
     &SE rim had blink (red -- Trident MB device) & event was in 
     progress at start of obs. Saw nothing without image tube. 
     Could not focus camera so no photos. Blink had ceased when 
     image tube was replaced. Temporary bright reddish spot nr. 
     Mask. photographed, (Apollo 10 watch). 17" reflector used. 
     NASA catalog weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=5.


2019-Oct-05 UT 10:05-11:07 Ill=47% Manzinus observed by Jean on 1969-5-23

     On 1969 May 23 at UT03:04-03:10 Jean (Montreal, Canada, 4" refractor, 
     seeing=good, transparency=3.) observed a white patch on the southern 
     horn of the Moon. It enlarged and became coloured pink and blue without 
     filters and reddish in a yellow filter(?). At 03:10UT the area became 
     as normal as the rest of the environment. Other observers participating 
     were: Rousseau (Canada, 8" reflector), Collier (Canada, 5.25" 
     refractor) and Dumas, St. Cyr (Canada, 5.25" refractor). Cameron 
     suspects a real event mixed in with Chromatic Aberation? Apollo 10 
     watch. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=1138 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Oct-05 UT 10:05-10:35 Ill=47% Maskelyne observed by Skinner on 1969-5-23

     Maskelyne 1969 May 23 UT 02:32-03:00 Observed by Skinner, Perez, 
     Barry, Bernie, Madison (Edinburgh, TX, USA) descibed in NASA 
     catalog as: "Temporary bright reddish spot nr. Mask. 
     photographed, (Apollo 10 watch). 17" reflector used. NASA 
     catalog weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Oct-05 UT 10:05-10:37 Ill=47% Maurolycus observed by Staedke on 1971-5-1

     On 1971 May 01 at UT21:00-21:50 Staedke, Jorgensen (Berlin, Germany, 
     x40 with filters) observed on Maurolycus a coloured, luminous 
     projection from the crater into and through the small crater on the 
     north rim. Colour of a dark candlelight then red. Length at diameter of 
     small crater. a drawing was supplied. Cameron 1978 catalog ID 1293 and 
     weight=2.


2019-Oct-05 UT 10:05-11:05 Ill=47% Mare_Crisium observed by Engels on 1972-5-19

     On 1972 May 19 UT 18:24 observed by Engels (52deg 40'N 9deg 5E, using 
     10x50 binouculars, transparency 2 out of 5, seeing unknown), a orange 
     to yellow bright flash was seen, lasting 0.1 sec at the southern rim of 
     Mare Crisium. Published in Hilbrecht and Kuveler, Moon and Planets, 30 
     (1984) p53-61. ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2019-Oct-05 UT 10:05-10:51 Ill=47% Maurolycus observed by Braga_R on 2012-2-28

     On 2012 Feb 28 R. Braga (Italy, Seeing III, Transparency very 
     good, AOG 100mm) UT 19:45-20:00 noted that only the tip of the 
     central peak was visible. Most of the crater was in darkness. 
     When viewed through a red filter, the central peak was visble, 
     but when viewed through a blue filter it was invisible. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-05 UT 10:10-12:02 Ill=47% Aristarchus observed by Wald on 1969-5-23

     On 1969 May 23 at UT 03:58-04:17 Wald (Zurich, Switzerland), E. & L. 
     Cross (Las Cruces, NM, USA, 6" reflector, x120, S=F, T=VG). "Crater 
     pulsations (Wald). Variations suspected at 0318, 0320-25 by E. Cross, 
     0417-27 by E. & L. Cross saw non-periodic short var., sudden increases 
     1-2 mag. & sudden to slow, 1-30s decreases to normal 0441-0446. 
     (confirm. ?Apollo 10 watch)". The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1139 and the 
     weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Oct-05 UT 10:57-12:50 Ill=47% Mare_Crisium observed by Brook_C on 2009-4-1

     On 2009 Apr 01 at UT 20:00-20:30 C. Brook (PLymouth, UK, 
     5" refractor, x40 and x100, using red and blue gelatine 
     Edmund Optics filters observed that a few bright areas
     in the centre of mare Crisium were brighter in red at 
     the start of the observing session than in blue, although 
     not at a higher magnification. The observation ended when 
     seeing worsened. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-05 UT 11:10-12:58 Ill=48% Barrow observed by Burton_M on 1972-5-19

     Barrow 1972 May 19 UT 20:17 M.Burton (UK, 13.5-inch Cassegrain 
     reflector, x180, seeing IV-III, Transparency: Fair) noted that 
     the E. side of the crater wall was brilliant. There was also a 
     luminous streak across the floor from E-W. No colour was 
     detected using a Mon Blink device. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-05 UT 11:22-11:48 Ill=48% Carlini observed by Williams_AS on 1865-11-24

     On 1865 Nov 24 at 20:00? UT Williams and others (England, UK, 4" 
     telescope) saw in Earthshine that Carlini was had a distinct 8th 
     magnitude star-like speck in it. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=140 and 
     the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-05 UT 11:23-13:17 Ill=48% Earthshine observed by Harrison_H on 1877-6-17

     On 1877 Jun 17 at UT 21:00? Harrison (USA?) observed a light point on 
     the Earthlit side of the Moon. He also observed a luminous point that 
     could not be identified (Cameron speculates that this could be a 
     confirtmation of Denett's Bessel observation?). The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=195 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-05 UT 11:40-13:32 Ill=48% Rabbi_Levi observed by Perez on 1969-5-23

     Rabi Levi 1969 May 23 UT 05:28-05:35 Observed by Perez, Gay, Skinner, 
     Floodine (Edinburgh, TX, USA, 17" reflector) "3 small craters in it, 
     middle one had a blink (Trident MB --red) very bright & the NW crater 
     of the 3 had a dimmer blink. A few bright flashes were seen vis. by 3 
     obs. without the image tube, lasting 15s. Clouded out at 0525h, (alt. 
     of moon was very low--atm?, ? Apollo 10 watch)." NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #1140.


2019-Oct-05 UT 12:53-13:48 Ill=48% Bessel observed by Dennett_F on 1877-6-17

     Bessel 1877 Jun 17 UT 22:30 Observed by Denett (England?, 2.75" 
     reflector) "Tho't he could detect a minute pt. of light shining out of 
     dark crater. (no high peaks in Bessel to catch light.)" NASA catalog 
     weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #194. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-05 UT 13:07-13:48 Ill=48% Aristarchus observed by Bornhurst on 1965-8-4

     On 1965 Aug 04 at UT 04:02-04:04 Bornhurst (Monterey Park, CA, USA, 
     10" reflector, x240, S=F-G) observed some star-like flashes in 
     Aristarchus in ashen light. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=889 and the 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-05 UT 13:31-13:48 Ill=48% Unknown observed by Unknown_Observer on 1965-10-2

     On 1965 Oct 02 at 04:00UT an unknown observer saw a TLP (feature name 
     not given in the Cameron catalog - nor a description or reference). The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=898 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weigh=1.


2019-Oct-05 UT 10:31-13:50 Ill=48% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Oct-06 UT 10:04-11:42 Ill=57% Agrippa observed by Bartlett on 1961-10-17

     Agrippa 1961 Oct 17 UTC 00:32-00:52 Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, 
     MD, USA) described in NASA catalog as: "Shadow of c.p. medium gray, 
     compared with black wall of shadow" 5" reflector x180. NASA catalog 
     weight=4 (high)


2019-Oct-06 UT 10:04-10:47 Ill=57% Aristarchus observed by Ricker on 1969-5-24

     On 1969 May 24 at UT 02:40 Ricker (Marquette, MI, USA, 10" reflector) 
     and Kelsey (Riverside, CA, USA, 8"? reflector). Ricker saw pulsations 
     in Aristarchus, partly confirmed by Kelsey. Cameron comments that it is 
     suprising that Aristarchus could be seen at first quarter - Apollo 10 
     watch. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1142 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=4.


2019-Oct-06 UT 10:04-10:30 Ill=57% Proclus observed by Classen on 1969-7-22

     Proclus 1969 Jul 22 UT 00:30? 01:15-01:25 observed by Classen 
     (Pulsnitz, E.Germany, 8" reflector), Leroy (Pittsburgh, 21.5" reflector 
     x310) and Cutter (Pennyslyvania) "Brightening of crater (Classen). 
     Alternatate brighening of S.part of crater at 15s intervals (too long
     interval for atm.) while N. half remained constant. Leroy confirmed 
     Cutter. (Both confirmed Classen Apollo 11 watch)." NASA catalog weight=
     5. NASA catalog weight=1151. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-06 UT 10:07-11:53 Ill=57% Theophilus observed by Haiduk on 1972-5-20

     Theophilus 1972 May 20 UTC 19:10-19:59 Observed by Haiduk (13.25E, 
     52.5N, 75mm refractor) "Well visible brihtening on the SW wall" S=2, T=
     3 Ref: Hilbrecht & Kuveler Moon & Planets (1984) Vol 30, pp53-61.


2019-Oct-06 UT 10:23-10:47 Ill=57% Ptolemaeus observed by Travnik on 1970-4-14

     ------------
     Ptolemeus 1970 Apr 14 UT 00:45-01:30 Observed by Nelson Travnik 
     and Sergio Vianna (Matias Barbosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil, 4" 
     refractor, x250, x400, - observing onditions very good, Kodak 
     Wratten 15 and 23 filters used) "A kind of glimmering mist 
     lifted and wafted inside the shady hollow of the crater (Apollo 
     13 watch)" NASA catalog weight=3 NASA catalog ID #1248. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Oct-06 UT 11:09-12:55 Ill=58% Proclus observed by Jewitt on 1972-3-22

     Proclus 1972 Mar 22 UT 19:50-21:55 Observed by Jewitt 
     (Middlesex, England, 6" reflector x150, S=7, T=4), Beddoes 
     (England), and Moore (Selsey, England, 12.5" reflector, x250, 
     x460, S=E, S=F) "At 1905h noted c.p. was invis. under all 
     magnifications. At 2050h saw minute star-like flash @ 0.5s 
     duration, followed by another 10s later, & another one 10s after 
     that. Occurred on N. crater floor. Proc. C was vis. Was using 
     blink device. Beddoe saw nothing unusual from 1850-1900h (prior 
     to event). Moore alerted, saw nothing unusual from 2100h on 
     (after flash. c.p. variation similar to rep'ts by Bartlett e.g. 
     ID=1309." NASA catalog weight=2. NASA catalog ID 1327. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Oct-06 UT 11:13-13:11 Ill=58% Piazzi_Smyth observed by Darling_D on 1991-4-22

     On 1991 Apr 22 at UT 01:10-01:22 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5", x99, seeing=7/10) observed that Piazzi-Smyth was 
     bright in red light but fuzzy in blue light. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=424 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3. 


2019-Oct-06 UT 11:21-13:13 Ill=58% Ross_D observed by Harris on 1969-5-24

     SE of Ross D 1969 May 24 UT 05:06-05:20 Observed by Harris 
     (Tucson, AZ, USA, 21" reflector, S=F-P) "Multiple albedo 
     changes, 2 bright areas vis. at 05:06, reduced at 0508h 
     Whittier, CA, USA, 19" refractor?) NASA catalog weight=0 (very 
     unreliable). NASA catalog ID #874. However a letter by Harris 
     states: Variable transparency - colourless bright area SE of 
     Ross D with variable condensation. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-06 UT 11:48-13:41 Ill=58% Vallis_Alpes observed by Unknown_English_Observer on 1993-3-30

     On 1993 Mar 30 at UT 19:30 an unknown British observer (Reading, UK) 
     noted that the crater at the end of the Alpine valley looked unusual. 
     However M. Cook (Frimley, UK) also observed the feature but found 
     nothing unusual. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=457 and weight=0. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-06 UT 11:53-13:46 Ill=58% Alphonsus observed by Knott_J on 1993-3-30

     On 1993 Mar 30 at UT19:35-21:15 J. Knott (England, UK, 8.5" reflector, 
     x180 and x216, seeing=II and Transparency=good) observed at 19:35 the 
     central peak of Alphonsus appeared to be extra bright although was 
     normal later, however the observer suspects that this was a contrast 
     related and was not confident to send out a TLP alert. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=458a and 458b and weights=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-06 UT 11:55-13:52 Ill=58% Linne observed by Schmidt_J on 1866-12-14

     Linne 1866 Dec 14 UT 20:00? Observed by Schmidt? (Athens, Greece?, 7" 
     refractor?) "Seen as a white spot, had been a fine black spot before as 
     seen by Schmidt. (Also Buckingham in Dec. 1866; also D 16,25th,27th, -- 
     not LTP?" NASA catalog weight=0 (probably not a TLP. NASA catalog ID 
     146.


2019-Oct-06 UT 12:07-14:04 Ill=58% Atlas observed by Darling_D on 1991-4-22

     On 1991 Apr 22 at UT 02:03-02:14 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5", x99, seeing 7/10) found, using a red and blue Moonblink 
     device that Atlas crater gave a blink, the dark spots inside the 
     crater have a dark nucleus in the blue filter. This effect was 
     not detected earlier that night. The Cameron 2006 catalog then 
     says "Atlas normal". The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=424 and the 
     weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-06 UT 12:14-14:11 Ill=58% Atlas observed by Theiss on 1973-4-10

     Atlas 1973 Apr 10 UT 18:37-19:49 Observed by Theiss (51N, 9.67E, 75mm 
     refractor, T=2, S=3) "N. wall of Atlas was yellow-green, several 
     magnifications tested with the same results"  - Hilbrecht and Kuveler, 
     Earth, Moon & Planets, 30 (1984), p53-61


2019-Oct-06 UT 12:21-13:47 Ill=58% Torricelli_B observed by Gray_R on 2002-10-14

     Torricelli B 2002 Oct 14 UT 02:58-03:43 Observed by Gray (Winnemucca, 
     NV, USA, 152mm refractor x114, x305, seeing Antoniadi III, transparency 
     good) "I was out this morning (2:58-3:43 UT, October 14, 2002) 
     observing Torricelli B. At 3:17 UT the west sunlit wall of the crater 
     brightened from an intensity (Elger Scale) of 5.0 to 9.0. In actual 
     terms it went from slightly less bright than the walls of Picard to as 
     bright as the sunlit west wall of Dionysius. This was observed at 114x 
     in white light, where all three craters were in the field of view 
     simultaneously. This event lasted less than a minute and no comparable
     brightening in Dionysius or Picard was seen. The wall of Torricelli B 
     returned to 5.0 in brightness. I continued to observe Torricelli B in 
     white light until 3:43 UT, but the brightness remained at 5.0. Before 
     the brightening I tried blinking Torricelli with the following 
     combinations of filters: Wratten Red 25 and Blue 38A, Red 25 and Blue 
     80, and Red 25 and Schott BG38 (Blue Green). Nothing showed up more 
     prominently in any combination except the Red 25-Blue 38A combination, 
     where Torricelli B became invisible in the Blue, probably because of 
     the filter density. Both the Blue 80 and Schott BG 38 seemed closer in
     density to the Red 25 than the Blue 38A is. I could not see any details 
     inside Torricelli B during this session, including the bright spot on 
     the NE rim." The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-06 UT 12:42-14:35 Ill=58% Mare_Crisium observed by Brook_C on 2009-4-2

     On 2009 Apr 02 at UT 21:45-22:05 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, 
     5" refractor, x40 and x100, using red and blue gelatine 
     Edmund Optics filters (rose No. 47 and blue No. 80), 
     transparency poor due to thick haze. seeing was excellent) 
     observed that that the rays that crossed Mare Cisrium from
     Proclus were brighter in red light than in blue. A similar 
     effect was also observed, to a lesser extent south of the
     Mare. Non-mare Crisium rays from Proclus did not have this effect. 
     The TLP was not seen at the higher magnification of x100.
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-06 UT 13:10-14:33 Ill=58% Beer observed by Darling_D on 1978-11-8

     On 1978 Nov 08 at UT03:00 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x95, seeing 8/10) saw near Beer and Theophilus (11W, 30N) a 
     bright flash inside the dark area. It appeared like a diamond twinkling 
     in sunlight and was somewhat dazzling to the eyes. Cameron wonders in 
     this was a meteor? The Cameron 2005 TLP catalog ID=39 and weight=2. 
     This is an ALPO observation. The ALPO/BAA weight is 3.


2019-Oct-06 UT 13:30-14:42 Ill=58% Mons_Piton observed by Schneller on 1960-12-26

     Piton 1960 Dec 26 ? UT 00:00? Observed by Schneller (Cleveland, OH, 
     USA, 8" Reflector, x53), "Red obscuration; less intense than Nov. (date 
     not given, but discussion suggests near SR, therefore Dec 28th most 
     likely date -- ancill. data given for 28th)." NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #732.


2019-Oct-06 UT 13:55-14:42 Ill=58% Aristillus observed by Pasternak on 1973-4-10

     Aristillus 1973 Apr 10 UT 20:18-20:24 Observed by Pasternak (53.33N, 
     7.5E, 75mm refractor, T=3, S=3) "Faint reddish area at the SE wall of 
     Aristillus"  - Hilbrecht and Kuveler, Earth, Moon & Planets, 30 (1984), 
     p53-61.


2019-Oct-06 UT 14:12-16:00 Ill=58% Archimedes observed by Try on 2001-9-25 *

     Near archimedes 2001 Sep 25 UT 08:30 Observed by Try (Whangarei, New 
     Zealand, 4" f/10 reflector) "observed two possible L.T.Ps. on the edge 
     of the terminator near the crater Archimedes. They appeared to be two 
     bright points of light about the size of Mount Piton. They seem to 
     form a triangle with Mount Piton. He observed them for two hours and 
     they were still visible when he ended his observing session.  He was 
     observing with a 4" f10 reflector. Then Moon age was 7.9 days old and 
     the colongitude was 4.83. submitted a drawing showing the area where 
     the lights were observed." ALPO report. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-07 UT 10:03-10:48 Ill=67% Yerkes observed by Jean on 1969-7-23

     Mare Crisium 1969 Jul 23 UT 00:45-00:55, 01:23-01:34  Observed by Jean 
     (Montreal, Canada, 4" refractor) and Chilton and Speck (Hamilton, 
     Canada, 10" reflector) "Bright area, radial rays in Cris. (nr. Yerkes?, 
     if so confirm. fr. Chilton & Speck). Chilton (confirmed by Speck) saw 
     reddening in Yerkes. Phenom. ended at 0134h. It recurred at times 
     thereafter, but never as strong (Apollo 11 watch)." NASA catalog 
     weight=2 (poor). NASA catalog ID #1152.


2019-Oct-07 UT 10:03-11:26 Ill=67% Yerkes observed by Jean on 1969-7-23

     Yerkes 1969 Jul 23 UT 00:45-00:55, 01:23-01:34  Observed by Jean 
     (Montreal, Canada, 4" refractor) and Chilton and Speck (Hamilton, 
     Canada, 10" reflector) "Bright area, radial rays in Cris. (nr. Yerkes?, 
     if so confirm. fr. Chilton & Speck). Chilton (confirmed by Speck) saw 
     reddening in Yerkes. Phenom. ended at 0134h. It recurred at times 
     thereafter, but never as strong (Apollo 11 watch)." NASA catalog 
     weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #1152.


2019-Oct-07 UT 10:07-11:53 Ill=67% Agrippa observed by Bartlett on 1961-10-18

     Agrippa 1961 Oct 18 UT 00:43-01:00 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 5" reflector x180, S=2-3, T=5) "Shadow of 
     c.p. remained grayish, wall shad. normal black. Not due to 
     seeing as wall & landslide shad. not affected. Not caused by 
     refl. sunlight because other similar obs. showed different 
     aspects." NASA catalog weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=2. NASA 
     catalog ID #750.


2019-Oct-07 UT 10:11-12:04 Ill=67% Aristarchus observed by Ricke on 1969-5-25

     On 1969 May 25 at UT03:53-05:47 Ricke (Tucson, AZ, USA, 8" reflector), 
     Leasure (Tucson, AZ, USA), Freuland (Tucson, AZ, USA), Sheridan 
     (Wyoming, USA), and Harris, Tucson, AZ, USA). "At 0353h saw brightening 
     of 1s intermittent pulsations of 1 mag., confirmed by Leasure at 0357; 
     0400 Freuland saw brightening. At 0514h Ricke, 1 mag, at 0515h-0530 -- 
     low amp. variations seen by Ricke & Harris. At 0525h Sheridan saw 
     bright. & puls. Harris at 0546h-47h saw 2 brightenings in crater. 
     (Apollo 10 watch seen in dark at gibbous phase!). (indep. 
     confirmation?)". The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1146 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Oct-07 UT 10:29-12:16 Ill=67% Eratosthenes observed by Bartlett on 1961-10-18

     Eratosthenes 1961 Oct 18 UT 01:05-01:25 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 5" reflector x180, S=P, T=G) "Fluorescent 
     violet on inner W(IAU) wall (reported as bright spot in MB). 
     NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID #751.


2019-Oct-07 UT 10:42-12:29 Ill=67% Proclus observed by Rudolphi on 1972-3-23

     1972 Mar 23 UT 19:24 Observer: Rudolphi (48.58N, 10E, 60mm refractor, 
     Transparency=2) "Pure white very bright event" Ref: Hilbrecht & Kuveler 
     - Earth, Moon & Planets (30) pp53-61.


2019-Oct-07 UT 10:52-12:45 Ill=67% Ross_D observed by Cross on 1969-5-25

     Ross D 1969 May 25 UT 04:34-04:38 Observed by Cross (Las Cruces, NM, USA, 6" f/17 refractor) "Bright spot adjacent to 
     NE segment of crater, 1.5-2" at greatest extent & much 
     brighter than rim of Ross D. Fuzziness here & extensive 
     obscur. of detail E. of Ross D (Apollo 10 watch)" NASA 
     catalog weight=3, NASA catalog ID #1147. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-07 UT 10:55-12:25 Ill=67% Schroter observed by Gruithuisen_F on 1839-7-19

     Schroter 1839 Jul 19 UT 22:00? Observed by Gruihuisen (Munich, Germany) 
     "Dark mist" NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID #119. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-07 UT 10:56-11:37 Ill=67% Eratosthenes observed by daSilva on 1970-4-15

     Eratosthenes 1970 Apr 15 UTC 01:25-01:42 Observed by daSilva 
     (Brazil, 10" reflector x200 & 20" refractor x224, Seeing=good, 
     Transparency=Good). "Vis. blink? on lower c.p. Ilum. walls were 
     yellowish-white C.p. diamond brightness with a pt. flashing. 
     Turbulent atms. impeded confirm. Other features were normal 
     (Apollo 13 watch. S-IVB impact at 0109h, took 70 s to reach A12 
     Alsep."  NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1252. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2019-Oct-07 UT 11:30-13:24 Ill=67% Alphonsus observed by Blair_G on 1980-10-17

     On 1980 Oct 17 at UT18:40-19:10 G. Blair (Weir, Renfrewshire, 
     Scotland, UK, 22cm reflector, seeing II, transparency excellent, 
     no spurious colour) noticed at 18:40UT that the bright central 
     peak of Alphonsus was elongated. At 18:41UT, at higher power, 
     the central peak separated from a bright point of light, 
     intensity about that of a 6th magnitude star. at 18:43UT a 
     filter check was made of the suspect point and surrounding 
     regions - slightly nrighter in red. At 18:50UT intensity of 
     bright point reduced to equivalent of 4th magnitude star. Noted 
     that Earthshine was the brightest that he had ever seen it. At 
     19:03 UT losing the Moon behind a chimney. UT 19:10 brief 
     appearance, bright point still seen at 4th magnitude. 19:27UT 
     the Moon disappears again. 20:15UT reappearance of the Moon and 
     Alphonsus appeared normal. The ALPO/BAA weight=2. This is a BAA 
     Lunar section observation.


2019-Oct-07 UT 11:53-13:45 Ill=67% Alphonsus observed by Knott_J on 1993-3-31

     On 1993 Mar 31 at UT19:35-21:15 J. Knott (England, UK, 8.5" reflector, 
     x180 and x216, seeing=II and Transparency=good) the central peak of 
     Alphonsus appeared to be bright but the observer was not confident 
     enough to initiate a TLP alert. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=458b and 
     weights=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=0.


2019-Oct-07 UT 13:51-14:38 Ill=68% Plato observed by Moore_P on 1952-4-3

     Plato 1952 Apr 03 UT 20:45-21:30 Observed by Wilkins and Moore 
     (Meudon, France, 33" x460) whilst checking up on a 1923 28" 
     refractor sketch by W.H. Stevenson's, thry failed to detect a 
     prominent floor craterlet (featured in the 1923 sketch) just 
     inside the W wall. They suspected an obscuration. 
     Interestingly the whole floor was was reported to be lacking 
     in detail many hours later as observed by Cragg in the USA. 
     NASA catalog weight=5. NASA catalog TLP ID No. #550. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Oct-07 UT 14:31-15:36 Ill=68% Torricelli_B observed by North_G on 1989-6-12

     On 1989 Jun 12 at UT 21:18-22:25 G. North (Herstmonceaux, UK, 
     Coude, seeing=V) noted at 21:18UT that Torricelli B was 
     "barely visible"- possibly this was seeing related. M. Cook 
     (Frimley, UK, 8" reflector, seeing=IV) found Toricelli B to be 
     Űxtremely dull - impossible to judge shadows on floor in 
     contrast to Cens." Holmes (Rockdale, England, UK, 8" 
     reflector, seeing=II-III) at UT21:30 also found Toricelli B 
     difficult to find at magnifications less than 200x. Cameron 
     comments that "Dulling is common on it at high Sun but 
     illumination doesn't seem to be the cause or related". The 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=365 and weight=5. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-07 UT 15:08-15:36 Ill=68% Plato observed by Cross on 1970-4-15

     Plato 1970 Apr 15 UT 05:38-05:40,05:51-05:53 Observed by Cross 
     (Las Cruces, NM, USA, 108mm Schiefspiegler or 152mm refractor, 
     S=6, T=5.5=VG). The observer noted a lack of detail inside the 
     crater floor, despite visibility of detail outside the crater. 
     Spectra were normal for color. (obs. similar to historic 
     reports. Apollo 13 watch?)" NASA catalog weight=1 and catalog ID 
     #1253. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-08 UT 10:02-10:34 Ill=76% Tycho observed by Barcroft on 1940-12-9

     Tycho 1940 Dec 09 UTC 04:00? Observer Barcroft (Madera, CA, USA). The 
     NASA catalog states: "Some luminosity on W. rim of outer slope". 6" 
     reflector used. NASA TLP catalog assigns a weight of 3 (average). NASA 
     catalog TLP ID No. #481.


2019-Oct-08 UT 10:02-11:06 Ill=76% Alphonsus observed by Fournier on 1969-7-24

     Alphonsus 1969 Jul 24 UT 01:00-02:35 Observed by Fournier (Lowell, 6" 
     reflector x158) and Dillon (Massachuchusets, USA) "Fournier saw obscur. 
     & red in crater. 1 of the dark halos (NE) was very difficult to detect 
     -- seemed to be a whitish mist. Detail best seen in blue & green 
     filters. Dillon found halo much lighter than usual, with sharp boundary 
     washed out. Halo was darker thru blue filter, indicating red when it's 
     normally bluisg-green. Next nite it was normal. Worsening weather 
     stopped obs. (confirmation. Apollo 11 watch)." NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very good). NASA catalog ID #1185.


2019-Oct-08 UT 10:02-11:28 Ill=76% Proclus observed by Miles_H on 1987-7-5

     On 1987 Jul 05 at UT 21:18-21:38 H. Miles (Cornwall, UK, Moon's 
     altitude 19 deg) found the north west rim of Proclus was very bright 
     and when he alternated between red and blue filters got a colour blink 
     reaction. There is no Cameron 2006 catalog entry for this TLP report. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-08 UT 10:02-00:00 Ill=76% Bullialdus observed by Darling_D on 1990-4-5

     On 1990 Apr 05 at UT 00:43-01:46 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 3" 
     refractor, x90) observed that Bullialdus (the crater was in shadow) was 
     pink in colour on the edge of its wall. The effect lasted from 01:15-
     01:44UT and he could discern the terrace on the western wall. 
     Comparisons were made to Tycho and Copernicus - all of which were 
     normal. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=399 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2019-Oct-08 UT 10:44-12:39 Ill=76% Bullialdus observed by Amery_GW on 1980-10-18

     Bullialdus 1980 Oct 18 UT 20:15-20:25 Observed bt Amery 
     (Reading, England, 10" reflector) "Colour blink reaction in 
     English Moon Blink Device" BAA Lunar Section report. Cameron 
     suggsets that this might be a permanent coloured blink area. 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=115 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-08 UT 10:44-12:39 Ill=76% Fracastorius observed by Robinson_JH on 1980-10-18

     Fracastorius 1980 Oct 18 UT 17:55-18:15 Observed by Robinson (Devon, 
     England, 260mm Newtonian, Seeing III, Transparency poor) "Colour blink 
     reaction in English Moon Blink Device - inner wall brighter in red than 
     in blue light, despite other features appearing normal. BAA Lunar 
     Section report. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=115 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Oct-08 UT 10:44-12:39 Ill=76% Manilius observed by Robinson_JH on 1980-10-18

     Manilius 1980 Oct 18 UT 17:55-18:15 Observed bt Robinson (Devon, 
     England, 260mm Newtonian, Seeing III, Transparency poor) "Colour blink 
     reaction in English Moon Blink Device - crater surrounds bright in red 
     and dull in blue light" BAA Lunar Section report. Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=115 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-08 UT 10:44-12:39 Ill=76% Plato observed by Robinson_JH on 1980-10-18

     Plato 1980 Oct 18 UT 17:55-18:15 Observed bt Robinson (Devon, England, 
     260mm Newtonian, Seeing III, Transparency poor) "Colour blink reaction 
     in English Moon Blink Device - floor patches easily seen in red, not 
     so well seen in blue" BAA Lunar Section report. Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=115 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-08 UT 10:58-12:53 Ill=76% Mons_La_Hire observed by Wilkins_HP on 1922-11-28

     La Hire 1922 Nov 28 UT 22:00? Observer Wilkins (England). NASA 
     catalog states: "Shadow cut thru by white streak (real LTP?. 
     Pickering's atlas shows same phase & col. & shadow is all 
     dark; elong. in peaks are N-S not E-W)" 15" reflectore used. 
     NASA Catalog assigns a weight of 4. NASA catalog TLP ID No. #
     388. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-08 UT 11:14-12:58 Ill=76% Manilius observed by Kern on 1972-5-22

     Manilius 1972 May 22 UTC 20:10-20:40 observed by Kern (48deg 45'N, 8deg 
     45'E, 60mm refractor) "The SW inner wall became brighter at times" - 
     Hilbrecht and Kuveler, Earth, Moon & Planets, 30 (1984), p53-61.


2019-Oct-08 UT 11:27-13:21 Ill=76% Plato observed by Brook_C on 2009-4-4

     On 2009 Apr 04 at UT 20:30-20:45 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK) observed a 
     slight pinkish mottling on the floor of Plato. The effect was no longer 
     visible after 20:45UT. A telephone alert was put out to M. Cook and G. 
     North. The former saw no colour, but this was after the event finished. 
     The latter observer reported cloudy conditions. A.Cook was probably 
     observing at the same time as C. Brook, via a couple of remotely 
     controlled telescopes in Aberystwyth. The results (time lapse imagery 
     through narrow band filters) will be examined at a later date.


2019-Oct-08 UT 11:55-13:43 Ill=76% Plato observed by Burton_M on 1972-3-24

     Plato 1972 Mar 24/25 UT 20:38-00:00 Observed by M.Burton (UK, 
     13.5" reflector, seeing IV-V, Transparency Fair, x180) UT20:38-
     20:45 floor was darker in a red filter than in a blue. UT20:47-
     20:56 JS Burgess (seeing 2/5, x200, with and without filters) 
     found everything normal (with and without filters). UT20:00-
     20:07 and 21:30-21:35 A.J. Beddoes found everything normal (with 
     and without filters). However at 23:10 L.Fitton suspected that 
     the E (IAU?) floor of Plato had a red-brown cast, but could not 
     be quite sure. UT23:54-00:00 M.Burton, detected the floor was 
     darker in red than in blue light. Burton did not detect any 
     colour without the use of filters on either of the two occasions 
     that he detecetd a blink. In view of the fact that two observers 
     did not detect anything, albeit not concurrently with the TLP 
     reports, this TLP is being given an ALPO/BAA weight of 1.


2019-Oct-08 UT 12:04-14:01 Ill=76% Eudoxus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1882-2-27

     On 1882 Feb 27 at UT 18:30-19:30 an unknown observer reported an 
     unusual shadow in Eudoxus. Apparently the shadow was seen to be normal 
     on 1882 Feb 25 at UT 20:30-20:45. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=228 and 
     weight=3. Reference: Sirius Vol 15, 167, 1882. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-08 UT 12:23-15:19 Ill=76% Eimmart observed by Pickering_WH on 1913-6-14 *

     Eimmart 1913 Apr 14 UT 01:00 Observed by Pickering (Mandeville, 
     Jamaica, 6.5" reflector) "By this date crater was clear  & at an albedo 
     ~5?. Drawings compare Jan. 16 & Aug.9, 1913." NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #344.


2019-Oct-08 UT 12:37-14:31 Ill=76% Plato observed by Cook_MC on 2009-4-4

     On 2009 Apr 04 at UT 21:40 M.C Cook (Mundesley, UK) after receiving a 
     telephone alert call, examined Plato crater. Although she did not 
     report C. Brook's slight mottled pink on the floor of Plato, she did 
     report through that the floor patches looked darker than normal, 
     especially in blue light and in red they were not visible at all. In 
     white light they were darker than normal. A.C. Cook was probably 
     observing at the same time via a couple of remotely controlled 
     telescopes in Aberystwyth. The results (time lapse imagery 
     through narrow band filters) will be examined at a later date.
     Note that this observation was made after C. Brook said that he could
     no longer see his TLP. Therefore this constitutes a different TLP
     as there had been a gap of 1 hour since the last TLP report.


2019-Oct-08 UT 13:41-15:16 Ill=76% Pytheas observed by Robotham on 1982-8-29

     On 1982 Aug 29 at UT 02:13-02:30 Robotham (Springfield, ON, 
     Canada, x97 and x160) found that the west rim of Pytheas crater 
     was very bright, especially at lower magnifications, being one of 
     the brightest spots on the Moon. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=182 
     and weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-08 UT 14:21-16:17 Ill=76% Agrippa observed by Bartlett on 1966-8-26

     Agrippa 1966 Aug 26 UTC 01:52-02:24 Observer: Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 5" reflector x437) "Shadow of C.p. was 
     grayish, wall shad. was normal black, C.p.itself barely disting. 
     from floor" S=5, T=3. NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog 
     ID #966. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-08 UT 15:38-17:46 Ill=77% Agrippa observed by Bartlett on 1967-7-17 *

     Shadow of central peak barely distinguishable.
     Residual wall shadow normal black. Landslip very
     conspicuous, 10 deg bright. Cameron 1978 catalog
     TLP ID=1040 and weight=4. Cameron 2006 Catalog
     Extension ID=12 and weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-08 UT 16:00-16:31 Ill=77% Plato observed by Albert_J on 2009-4-5

     On 2009 Apr 05 at UT 01:03-01:31, 01:44 and 02:30 J. Albert 
     (FL, USA, 11"  reflector, x224 and x311, transparency 4-3 
     and seeing 5-6/10) noted a tiny point on the south east
     rim of Plato, adjacent to the east wall shadow. It was
     first seen at x311 without filters, then in both Wratten
     25 (red) and Wratten 38A (blue) - it was faintest in the
     latter. The spot was probably a high point on the south east
     rim. By 01:28UT the spot was no longer visible in the blue
     filter, but could still be seen well in red and white light.
     No change was seen during rechecks at 01:44 or 02:30. The
     observer considers that this was not a TLP as it was on the
     limits of detectability and anyway observing conditions were
     poor. The ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2019-Oct-09 UT 10:01-11:53 Ill=83% Parry observed by Porter on 1974-4-3

     Parry 1974 April 03 UT 01:10-01:45 Observed by Porter (Narragansett, 
     Rhode Island, USA, 6" reflector, S=F, T=2) "Darkening of floor & 
     brightening of central crater. Pulsations for 1 min. Albedo of LTP=2
     (fl.), 6.5 (c.p.). Normal floor=3?. Floor seemed darker than earlier & 
     approached surrounding plain(=2) while N-S streak seemed more 
     conspicuous. Pulsations same freq. as star excursions so prob. due to 
     terr. atm. aberr. Streak most conspicuous at 0145h" NASA catalog 
     weight=2 (poor). NASA catalog ID #1391.


2019-Oct-09 UT 10:01-11:11 Ill=83% Mons_Piton observed by Louderback_D on 1983-8-19

     On 1983 Aug 19 at UT 07:15-07:30 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     3" refractor, x150) found that the direct sunlit side of Mons Piton 
     mountain (E) was brighter than (his designated) points C and D and this 
     happened at the same time as some "blurring"at 07:15UT. The darker 
     side, between C, A and B were not so dark through a red filter as 
     through a blue filter (this was the opposite of what had been seen 
     before at a high sun angle). Louderback suspects that there had been a 
     colour change since he last observed. He also noted that in red light 
     the whole lunar disk appeared fuzzy and out of focus. Louderback noted 
     a 1 sec brightness on the east slope and the whole mountain sharp in 
     blue light. The Moon's altitude was low though. Brightness measurements 
     were 4 in blue light and >= 4.6 in red light and "so illdefined almost 
     blended into plain". Cameon commnets that a telescope colour/focussing 
     issue may have been at work here! The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=226 and 
     weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-09 UT 10:01-10:48 Ill=83% Campanus observed by Bush_S on 2014-1-11

     Campanus 2014 Jan 11 UT 22:00-22:30 S.Bush (UK, 6" SCT, x180, 
     seeing average) made a sketch of the Campanus and Mercator 
     craters. He found that the central peak of Campanus difficult 
     to resolve and the floors of both craters were devoid of 
     detail. Mercator was the lighter shade of the two floors. 
     Earlier at 19:47 UT M.Brown (Huntingdon, UK) imaged this 
     region and using Registax resolved details on the floors of 
     both craters, though Mercator clearly was slightly lighter in 
     floor shade and had less detail on its floor than Campanus. 
     The most likely explanation was that it was just seeing 
     effects blocking the visibility of detail - this of course is 
     less of a problem for a Registax usid on the CCD image. 
     However just to be sure this observation is being given an 
     ALPO/BAA TLP weight of 1, to encourage visual observers to 
     attempt this observation under similar illumination and 
     seeing.


2019-Oct-09 UT 10:54-12:23 Ill=83% Aristarchus observed by daSilva on 1969-7-25

     Aristarchus 1969 Jul 25 UT 02:15-03:00 Observed by Jose L. da 
     Silva (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 13" refractor) "Unusual 
     brightness whole time in center of W. inner slope; rest of 
     crater & Herodotus appeared normal. SW to NW inner slope had 
     pronounced brightness. Aris. still in dark! Apollo 11 watch)." 
     NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID=1186. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-09 UT 11:39-13:36 Ill=83% N_Pole observed by HMS_Coronation on 1875-7-14

     In 1875 Jul 14 at 02:00UT Davidson and Loftus (HMS Coronation, Gulf of 
     Siam Champion Bay, long 99deg, using naked eye and binoculars) observed 
     "a luminous projections from upper (N?) limb. Phenom. was absent there 
     on next nite, but a smaller 1 at another pt. (not an LTP? - but many 
     such repts)". The Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2019-Oct-09 UT 12:22-14:19 Ill=84% Gassendi observed by Darling_D on 1991-4-25

     On 1991 Apr 25 at UT 02:14-02:37 UT D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, 
     USA, 12.5" reflector, x64, S=7/10, T=4) found that after 
     sketching Gassendi, that at 02:14 the central peak was very 
     bright in red light, and barely detectable in blue light. By 
     02:26UT a strong blink was noticed on the NW rim, being very 
     bright in the red filter. Effect still present at 02:32UT. The 
     effect was not seen earlier at 01:57UT. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=425 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-09 UT 12:35-13:36 Ill=84% Alphonsus observed by Hole_G on 1959-2-18

     Alphonsus 1959 Feb 18 UT 21:00? Observed by hole (Brighton, 
     England, 24" reflector) "Red patch (Moore in Survey of the Moon 
     says Jan. '59). Moore says, Warner, in Eng. saw it bright red in 
     an 18-in refr. Hedervari & Botha in Hungary saw red patch & 
     several in US (indep. confirm. ?)" NASA catalog weight=5. NASA 
     catalog ID #714. ALPO/BAA weight=5.


2019-Oct-09 UT 12:42-14:39 Ill=84% Atlas observed by Darling_D on 1991-4-25

     On 1991 Apr 25 at UT 02:34-02:37 UT D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, 
     USA, 12.5" reflector, x64) found that Atlas had spots in 
     it that were "more intense in blue". No blinks were detected 
     elsewhere on the Moon apart from Gassendi. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=425 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-09 UT 14:40-16:18 Ill=84% Plato observed by Crick on 1979-12-29

     On 1979 Dec 29 at UT 17:45-18:20 Crick (Merchtem, Belgium, 6" 
     reflector, x140, seeing=III) found a violet spot in the NW inner wall. 
     The floor was obscured of detail on the northern half. All other 
     regions studied appeared normal. Observer unsure if this was a TLP or 
     spurious colour. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=80 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2019-Oct-09 UT 17:04-17:25 Ill=84% Gassendi observed by Cook_AC on 1979-12-29

     Gassendi 1979 Dec 29 UTC 20:09-22:04 - Observer: Cook (Frimley, Surrey, 
     UK) "Colour seen - almost certainly spurious colour and not a TLP".
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-10 UT 10:00-11:27 Ill=90% South observed by Maw on 1913-6-15

     40-54W, 54N-60N i.e. nr. South? or J.Herschel 1913 Jun 15 UT 
     22:00? Observer: Maw (Surrey, UK, 6" & 8" refractors) "Small 
     distinct redish spot which became diffused into a patch as 
     term. advanced on the plateau NE of the crater South. When the 
     plateau was on the term. (Goodacre says the crater was 
     J.Herschel for same date -- 2 different spots or misident. for 
     one?" NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #345. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Oct-10 UT 10:00-10:40 Ill=90% Aristarchus observed by no on 1969-5-28

     On 1969 May 28 at UT 02:18 Delano (Taunton? MA, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x300, seeing=fair and transparency=good) through the 
     red filter at 02:18UT saw a bright area on the west wall of 
     Aristarchus crater become 2x brighter than normal then faded 
     back to normal in < 1 min duration. The spot was 8km centred on 
     sigma=0.682 and eta=0.397. No events seen at Kepler (Apollo 10 
     watch). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1149 and weight=4. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2019-Oct-10 UT 10:00-10:55 Ill=90% Aristarchus observed by no on 1969-5-28

     On 1969 May 28 at UT 02:18 Delano (Taunton? MA, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x300) suspected a short duration flare up on the W 
     wall of Aristarchus at 0.682 and 0.397, but it may have been due 
     to poor seeing. No events seen at Kepler (Apollo 10 watch). The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1149 and weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-10 UT 10:00-10:34 Ill=90% Aristarchus observed by Fitton on 1975-2-22

     On 1975 Feb 22 at 19:00-22:50 Fitton (Lancashire, UK, 8" reflector, 
     seeing=II-III-I) saw Aristarchus (at 19:00UT) blue, with no obscuration 
     visible in white, red or blue filters. This was not a telescopic 
     effect. "Obs. 4.5h. Says it & next 5 nites obs. were due to high 
     pressure system W. of obs.". Foley found nothing unsual in Aristarchus 
     in his observing session, which overlapped Fittons. The 1978 catalog 
     ID=1396 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-10 UT 10:00-10:34 Ill=90% Prinz observed by Foley_PW on 1975-2-22

     On 1975 Feb 22 at 20:04-22:50 P.W. Foley (Kent, UK, 12" reflector, 
     seeing=good) observed Prinz to have a diffuse white obsecuration. There 
     were pulsations of 30-50sec intervals. Effect ceased at 22:50UT and 
     indeed was fading earlier from 22:35UT. Photgraphs were taken but 
     showed nothing unusual and no colour. Aristarchus was also negative.
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1396 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-10 UT 10:00-11:02 Ill=90% Gassendi observed by Foley_PW on 1978-1-20 *

     On 1978 Jan 20 at UT19:10 P.W. Foley (Kent, UK, 12" reflector) observed 
     a red spot at the southern edge of Gassendi C. P. Moore (Slesey, UK, 
     15" reflector, S=II-III) reported nothing unusual 17:00-17:50. Turner 
     and others reported negative at 22:01. Pedler (UK, 12.5" reflector, 
     S=III-IV) though detected a yellow-orange tint on the east floor of 
     Gassendi A but the effect faded during poor seeing moments. Cameron 
     2005 catalog ID=24 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-10 UT 10:00-10:52 Ill=90% Bullialdus observed by Cook_AC on 1980-12-18

     On 1980 Dec 18 at UT20:46-23:58 A.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, 12" reflector, 
     40-250x, S=IV and transparency good) found the north west wall to be 
     brighter in red than in blue light, however the effect faded during 
     21:29-21:41UT and was gone by 22:40UT. There was however spurious 
     colour on the north west wall. M. Cook (Frimley, UK) found the central 
     peak to be both bright and diffuse, and brighter in red than in blue 
     light during 20:52-20:57UT, however at "22:53-23:58 c.p. very bright & 
     previous area decreased in size. No detail in white or red, just 
     visible in blue. Sketch (J. Cook) Orange out on NW rim & on NW side of 
     c.p. Similar effects seen on  other craters. (madej) c.p. & W. rim wall 
     very sharp. c.p. disappears in yellow but still seen in purple. 
     (pedler) c.p. > red than blue but no obstruction. W wall interior 
     dusky, darker in blue." A.C. Cook's photo depicts the central peak as 
     very bright. Cameron 2006 catalog TLP ID=120 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Oct-10 UT 11:14-12:40 Ill=90% Aristarchus observed by Migon on 1969-7-26

     Aristarchus 1969 Jul 26 UT 02:30-03:00 Observed by Mauro Migon 
     (19" refractor), Julio Nogueira (10" refractor), Wairy Cardoso 
     (13" refractor) all from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil "Crater was 
     gray-bluish, different from any other region & unusually bright. 
     Cardoso saw brightening, used blue, red, green & neutral 
     filters. Apollo 11 watch, Jose da Silva says obs. no good, obs. 
     was inexperienced. However it is similar to many other obs. with 
     much experience)." NASA catalog weight=2. NASA catalog ID 
     No. 1187. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-10 UT 12:24-14:20 Ill=90% Gassendi observed by Wilkins_HP on 1951-5-17

     Gassendi 1951 May 17 UT 22:45 Observed by Wilkins (Kent, 
     England, 15" reflector) "Bright speck glowed for 3s. (meteor ?)" 
     This was to the W of the central Mts and about the same 
     magnitude as a 4th mag star to the naked eye. JALPO Vol 5 No 8 
     p4, quotes a 1s duration. NASA catalog weight=0. NASA catalog 
     weight=544. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-10 UT 12:38-14:11 Ill=90% Mons_Pico observed by Findlay on 1976-3-12

     Pico 1976 Mar 12 UT 21:00? Observed by Findlay (England?) "A ray seen 
     extended fr. mt. in SW (IAU?) direction -- likened to a hockey stick. 
     (not seen in Pickering's photo atlas at col.=53 deg)." NASA catalog 
     weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #1430.


2019-Oct-10 UT 14:26-16:23 Ill=90% Herodotus observed by Bartlett on 1950-6-27

     Herodotus 1950 Jun 27 UTC 02:30 Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA) reported 
     a bright point in crater. This is mentioned in the Middlehurst TLP 
     catalog but not in the Cameron catalog. The source comes from a 
     Strolling Astronomer article. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-10 UT 14:32-15:16 Ill=90% Herodotus observed by Bartlett on 1966-6-30

     Herodotus 1966 Jun 30 UTC 03:10-03:35 Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, 
     MD, USA) described in the NASA catalog as: "Bright pseudo-peak again 
     vis. within floor shadow. Peak est. 5 bright. Had seen it at successive 
     lunations in '66" 4" x280 refractor used. NASA catalog weight=4 (high). 
     NASA catalog TLP ID No. #950. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-10 UT 14:40-16:37 Ill=90% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Weier_D on 1992-3-16

     On 1992 Mar 16 at UT 00:39-01:14 D. Weier (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 11" 
     reflector) at 00:39UT noted some soft, diffused, faint ´llumination 
     within the shadow projected over the Cobra Head area, though it had a 
     sharp appearance to the edge of the shadow. D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, 
     USA, 11" reflector) was taking photographs from UT 00:51 and making 
     drawings and visual descriptions. The first 3 photographs in the 
     sequence have the crater as normal. Four other photographs reveal an 
     abnormality. Seeing conditions were excellent and a great deal of 
     surface detail was seen inside Aristarchus crater - however the 
     apeparance of the Cobra's Head was "washed out" and again shadows near 
     to this were illuminated. The NASA catalog ID=442 and the weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3. 


2019-Oct-10 UT 15:27-17:18 Ill=90% Alphonsus observed by Brook_C on 2001-8-30

     On 2001 Aug 30 at UT20:35-21:15 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK) found a dimming 
     in the central peak of Alphonsus, however it had returned to normal by 
     Aug 31 UT 00:29-00:50UT when A.C. Cook (Alexandria, VA, USA, 8" 
     reflector) examined the area, though there were some slight brightness 
     variations that were attributed to seeing conditions. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Oct-10 UT 15:59-17:49 Ill=90% Gassendi observed by Adams_C on 1993-4-3

     On 1993 Apr 03 at 23:39UT C. Adams (FL, USA, 24" reflector, x168) 
     noticed a "translucent orange" colour in Gassendi crater within a 35deg 
     sector (apex at the centre) - row of 3 central peaks extending west - 
     the western central peak appeared as a dome with a summit craterlet. 
     The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=450 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2019-Oct-10 UT 16:00-17:49 Ill=90% Proclus observed by Weier_D on 1993-4-3

     On 1993 Apr 03 at 23:39UT D. Weier (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 7x50 
     binoculars) observed 2 flashes within the Proclus crater. The Cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=450 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-10 UT 17:00-18:19 Ill=91% Aristarchus observed by Hislop on 1884-11-29

     Hislop of England? saw Aristarchus as nebulous at the centre, despite 
     the fact that elsewhere features were well defined. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=246 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-10 UT 17:10-18:19 Ill=91% Cavendish observed by Houghton on 1956-1-24

     Cavendish 1956 Jan 24 UTC 20:34-20:45 Observed by Houghton and Warner 
     (England) "Variable flashes seen from W. inner(?) wall of crater, then 
     a little inside the terminator. Flashes began with a bright glare at 
     20:34, were very bright for ~3 min, then faded. Flash rate 
     approximately every 1.5 sec. Other point like peaks did not flash. Also 
     indications were seen of reflections of flashes from E. (inner?) wall 
     and the crater's floor was faintly lit by a glare. Ref: Strolling 
     Astronomer p27, Vol 45, 2003. 17cm reflector x230. Seeing good-
     excellent. NASA catalog assigns this observation a weight of 4 (good). 
     NASA TLP ID No. #631.


2019-Oct-10 UT 17:24-18:19 Ill=91% Torricelli_B observed by Cook_MC on 1985-6-29

     On 1985 Jun 29 at UT 22:56 M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, seeing poor) 
     observed that Torricelli B looked as bright as a mountain to its south 
     west - no colour was seen. Cameron comments that this was similar to 
     Marshall's 1985 Jul 1 observation. The cameron 2006 catalog ID=278 and 
     the weight=3. 


2019-Oct-10 UT 17:44-18:19 Ill=91% Promontorium_Laplace observed by Prout on 1977-1-31

     Promontory LaPlace 1977 Jan 31 UT 20:49-23:00 Observed by Foley 
     (England, 11.75" reflector, x360), Prout (England, 4" refractor or 
     reflector?), Findlay (Dundee, Scotland, 10" reflector, x180, S=VG), 
     Ford (Dundee, Scotland), Mooney (Dundee, Scotland) "With filters in 
     eyepiece, tho't he saw a possible darkening in the blue but no 
     variation in red. Altho. a deep shadow is normal to the W. of the cape 
     at this period, (then cape must have a slope > 30deg!). he wondered if 
     shad. was more extensive than usual? Prout noted a dark inky coma-
     shaped spot. Dundee obs. concluded it was a shadow. Took photos. 
     Analysis of them was underway at time of rep't." NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very high). NASA catalog ID #1462.


2019-Oct-10 UT 18:19-00:00 Ill=91% Picard observed by Moore_P on 1948-8-16

     E. of Picard 1948 Aug 16/17 UTC 22:30-02:26 Observed by Moore & Baum 
     (Chester, UK) described in NASA catalog as: "2 areas E. of Picard 
     appeared featureless. Cloud-like patches, 12(?)inch reflector. NASA 
     catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID No. #509.


2019-Oct-11 UT 09:59-12:47 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Leitzinger on 1972-5-25 *

     Aristarchus 1972 May 25 UT 19:32-19:38 Observed by Leitzinger (8.75E, 
     48.75N, Germany, 60mm f/15 telescope T=2, S=2) "Bright point at SE wall 
     well visible, colour changed to orange shortly before it disappeared" 
     published in Hilbrecht & Kuveler (1984) Moon and Planets, Vol 30, p53-61.


2019-Oct-11 UT 09:59-10:13 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Robinson_JH on 1975-4-23 *

     On 1975 Apr 23 at UT 20:30 J-H Robinson (Teighmouth, Devon, UK, 260mm 
     reflector, x200). Observer was observing since 20:30UT, at 21:00UT 
     though they noticed red on the outside south wall of Aristarchus, a 
     hazy ill defined area that was larger in a red filter than in blue 
     filter, and outside east wall was bright in red. At 21:08UT the outside 
     west wall of Aristarchus no longer gave a colour blink reaction, and at 
     21:22UT the colour blink on the southern end of the crater ceased, but 
     the image blur remained (in both red and blue filters) despite the rest 
     of the crater being sharp in detail. Observations ceased at UT 21:35 
     because the blurring at the southern end seemed to be normal and this 
     was confirmed when checked with photographic atlases. Other craters 
     such as Proclus, Pickering, Tycho, Gassendi, Copernicus, Alphonsus, 
     Plato, Menelaus, Manilius, Linne and Theophilus, showed no colour blink 
     reactions. However Picard had a red bright blink from 20:30-20:40 and 
     the permanant blink on the N. Floor of Fracastorius was detectable. 
     Also Plato floor shadings were clearer in red than in blue - 
     intermittently. This is a BAA lunar section observation. No estimation 
     of transparency or seeing is given, nor any comment on whether spurious 
     colour was seen in any craters visually. ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2019-Oct-11 UT 10:25-11:44 Ill=95% Promontorium_Agarum observed by Albert_J on 2015-11-24

     Promontoroum Agarum. On 2015 Nov 24 UT 00:50-01:15 J. Albert 
     (Lake Worth, FL, USA, Celestron C11, x224, seeing 4/10, 
     transparency = 3rd magnitude) observed that this feature was 
     slightly brighter through a red Wratten 25 filter than 
     through a blue Wratten 44a filter. ALPO/BAA TLP weight=2.


2019-Oct-11 UT 11:07-14:10 Ill=95% Eratosthenes observed by Martz_EP on 1936-5-4 *

     Eratosthenes 1936 May 04 UT 05:40 Observed by E.P.Martz 
     (Mandeville, Jamaica) "Detected bright spots on floor" NASA 
     catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #414. Ref. Haas, W. 
     1942, J.Royal.Ast. Soc. Canada, 36, 398. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-11 UT 11:11-11:34 Ill=95% Gassendi observed by Moore_P on 1987-9-5 *

     Gassendi 1987 Sep 05 UT 20:25 Observed by Moore (Selsey, Sussex, UK, Antoniadi 
     III seeing, 12.5" reflector) "Intensely bright craterlet south of central 
     peak, surrounded by a luminous nimbus. Foley (Kent, UK, 12" reflector)onfirmed 
     the crater was highly luminous at 21:20, and surrounded by a blue halo that 
     had a darker blue band within it. This craterlet faded over time, and by 21:20 
     Moore considered that it was no longer prominent, by 21:22 Foley confirmed the 
     reduced brilliance, and by 21:30 Moore considered it to be perfectly normal. 
     Moore considers the nimbus effect to be normal. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=
     306 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA catalog weight=3.


2019-Oct-11 UT 11:41-12:04 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Cook_AC on 1987-9-5 *

     On 1987 Sep 05 at 20:55UT A.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, 90mm questar 
     telescope, x130, seeing III-IV, Moon 16 deg in altitude) observed a 
     dusky dark gray area just north of Herodotus and just south of the 
     Cobra Head. The interior shadow on the east of Herodotus by comparison 
     wad black and distinct. No change was seen when viewed through a 
     rotated polaroid filter. Apparently D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA) 
     was observing at the same time but had better observing conditions and 
     could see detail in this region, suggesting that it was not a TLP. 
     There is no Cameron entry for this report. The ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2019-Oct-11 UT 11:49-13:47 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Darling_D on 1979-12-2

     On 1979 Dec 02 at UT 00:36 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x349, seeing? 9-10/10 at 32 deg altitude) observed a bright 
     flash between Aristarchus and Prinz crater on the illuminated part of 
     the surface. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=76 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Oct-11 UT 12:44-14:41 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Pasternak on 1973-4-15

     Aristarchus 1973 Apr 15 UTC 19:03-20:13 observed by Pasternak (53deg 
     20'N, 7deg 30'E, 75mm reflector) "N wall was blue to violet, beginning 
     disappearance at 20:08UT., end at 20:13UT." - Hilbrecht and Kuveler, 
     Earth, Moon & Planets, 30 (1984), p53-61


2019-Oct-11 UT 12:50-14:48 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1981-10-11

     On 1981 Oct 11 at UT04:45-05:03 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 3" 
     refractor) detected a violet tinge on the dark nimbus of Aristarchus, 
     however by 05:13 the coloured tinge had gone. Louderback suspects an 
     atmospheric effect. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=155 and weight=0. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-11 UT 13:51-15:12 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Cardoso on 1969-7-27

     Aristarchus - 1969 Jul 27 UT 05:00-07:00 Observed by W. 
     Cardoso (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 13" Refractor) "Brightening. 
     Filter used, (Jose da Silva says obs. no good, obs. 
     inexperienced. Apollo 11 watch)." NASA catalog weight=0. SA 
     catalog ID No. 1188. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-11 UT 14:05-15:25 Ill=95% Cleostratus observed by Lord_CJR on 1974-2-5

     Pythagoras-Cleostratus 1974 Feb 05 UT 01:45,02:45 observed by 
     Lord (St Anne's-on-Sea, Eng., 3" refractor, x135) "Event 
     normal in integrated light. Light, full surface detail in red 
     filter, dark, with full surface detail in blue filter. Other 
     term. features did not show it. Only E.floor of Pythag., 
     Babbage northern crater chain & NW floor of Cleostr. 
     (According to Fitton's criteria this was a tenuous gas above 
     the surface. Date given as 5th, but term. was at least 3deg 
     E. Therefore these features were in the dark then. Ancill. 
     data given for 6th)." NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog 
     ID=#1387. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-11 UT 14:05-15:25 Ill=95% Pythagoras observed by Lord_CJR on 1974-2-5

     Pythagoras-Cleostratus 1974 Feb 05? UTC 01:45,02:45 observed by Lord 
     (St Anne's-on-Sea, Eng., 3" refractor, x135) "Event normal in 
     integrated light. Light, full surface detail in red filter, dark, with 
     full surface detail in blue filter. Other term. features did not show 
     it. Only E.floor of Pythag., Babbage northern crater chain & NW floor 
     of Cleostr. (According to Fitton's criteria this was a tenuous gas 
     above the surface. Date given as 5th, but term. was at least 3deg E. 
     Therefore these features were in the dark then. Ancill. data given for 
     6th)." NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID=#1387.


2019-Oct-11 UT 14:36-15:57 Ill=95% Manilius observed by Cardoso on 1969-7-27

     Manillius 1969 Jul 27 UT 05:45-05:46 Observed by Wairy Cardoso 
     (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 13" refractor, x360) "Bright spot in 
     Manillius (Apollo 11 watch, J. M. L. da Silva says obs. no good 
     because of inexper. of obs)" NASA catalog weight=0. NASA catalog 
     ID #1189. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-11 UT 15:18-16:39 Ill=95% Menelaus observed by Cardoso on 1969-7-27

     Menelaus 1969 Jul 27 UT 1969 Jul 27 UT 06:27-07:30 Observed by 
     Wairy Cardoso (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 13" refractor, x360) 
     "Brightening in Menelaus (Apollo 11 watch, J. M. L. da Silva 
     says obs. no good because of inexper. of obs)" NASA catalog 
     weight=0. NASA catalog ID #1189. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-11 UT 15:27-16:58 Ill=95% Alphonsus observed by McCord on 1965-10-8

     Alphonsus (black spot, upland #1) 1965 Oct 08 UT 05:48-08:23 Observed 
     by McCord (Mt Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + spectrograph) "Line 
     depth ratios a/b(H?), c/d (K?) were significantly low for upland #1 & 
     abnormally high for Alphonsus black spot, but not as pronounced as the 
     other area was high compared with 23 other areas" NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very good). NASA catalog ID #899.


2019-Oct-11 UT 15:47-17:40 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1976-1-14

     Aristarchus 1976 Jan 14 UT 20:00-23:00 Observed by P.W. Foley 
     (Wilmington, Kent, UK) - Deep Violet/Blue spot interior N/WW 
     corner. No colour seen elsewhere. It was only a blue spot on the 
     Jan 13. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-11 UT 16:37-18:30 Ill=95% Plato observed by Robinson_JH on 1976-1-14

     Plato 1976 Jan 14 UT 20:50 Observed by J.H-Robinson (Teignmouth, 
     UK, 26cm Newtonian, Wratten 25 and 44a filters, x200, seeing 
     fair to poor). The Plato floor patches were clearer in red than 
     in blue light. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-11 UT 17:50-19:10 Ill=95% Briggs observed by Grego_P on 2010-4-27

     On 2010 Apr 27 at UT 00:10-00:30 and 01:45-02:00 P. Grego (St 
     Dennis, UK, 20 and 30cm reflectors) noticed a craterlet just to 
     the east of Briggs and an E-W trending lineament or wrinkle 
     ridge that did not show on NASA LAC charts. Further checks did 
     not reveal it on Lunar Orbiter mosaics, or on very recent LROC 
     images of the area. Possibly these are very low relief features 
     that show only under very shallow illumination conditions. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1 until we get confirmation at repeat 
     illumination.


2019-Oct-11 UT 17:55-19:10 Ill=95% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1975-3-25 *

     On 1975 Mar 25 at UT18:50-20:50 P.W. Foley (Kent, UK) observed 
     blue/grey in Aristarchus. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-11 UT 18:18-18:36 Ill=95% Schickard observed by Wilkins_HP on 1944-8-31

     Schickard 1944 Aug 31 UTC 21:00? Observed by Wilkins (Kent, England) 
     described in the NASA catalog as: "Saw a mist in it which was gone next 
     nite. interor was dotted with white spots, contrasting sharply with 
     dark areas. All very clear on Aug 15 at sunset". 8.5" reflector. NASA 
     catalog weight=4 {high). NASA catalog TLP ID No. #492. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2019-Oct-11 UT 18:29-20:19 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1983-9-20 *

     On 1983 Sep 20 at UT 05:08-06:13 Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     3" refractor, x150, seeing poor and chromatic aberation on the limb) 
     detected "purple"in the vicinity of Aristarchus crater and this was 
     stongest on the north and north west external rims, however there was 
     no "violet glare"from inside the crater. However the region of the 
     central peak was very bright - though he could not detect the central 
     peak. The brightness of the TLP was 4.5 and it should normally be 3 
     (nimbus area). Near the "big plain"it was 7. The chromatic aberation 
     seen on the crater. There was also violet on the northen wall of 
     Herodotus crater and the Cobra Head. ¤t appeared dark blue in the blue 
     filter", the surrounds remained gray". Apparently on the 26th the"ring 
     was still dark with faint violet - nearly normal". Cameron comments 
     that the TLP was due to spurious colour. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=
     229 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-12 UT 10:57-11:59 Ill=98% Plato observed by Thornton_FH on 1945-10-19

     Plato 1945 Oct 19 UT 23:24:30 Observed by Thornton (Northwich, 
     England) described in the NASA catalog as: "Bright flashes on 
     the floor near E.wall (meteor?) but others have seen flashes 
     there too. time given is 1123, must be P.M., local time. MBMW 
     gives date as Oct 19, which is wrong" Haas (more reliable 
     account) in his 2003 article in Strolling Astronomer Vol 45, 
     p28 states" 23cm x220 reflector used - "minute but brilliant 
     flash of light seen just inside eastern border of walled plain 
     Plato. Colour was said to be orange side of yellow. NASA 
     catalog weight=4 & NASA catalog TLP ID No. #494. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2019-Oct-12 UT 11:08-13:06 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Crowe on 1964-9-20

     Aristarchus-Herodotus 1964 Sep 20 UTC 04:15-04:50 - Observers: Crowe & 
     Cross (Whittier, CA, USA, 19" reflector x390) "Several red spots in 
     area between the 2 craters. No change in phenom. so stopped observing"
     NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA catalog ID #849.


2019-Oct-12 UT 11:10-13:07 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Presson on 1965-9-9

     On 1965 Sep 09 at UT 13:20 Presson observed an orange-red srip on the 
     floor of Aristarchus. Cameron says that this was confirmed later by 
     Bartlett? The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=892 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2. 


2019-Oct-12 UT 11:40-13:37 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Alter on 1959-1-23

     Aristarchus 1959 Jan 23 UT 06:20 - Observer: Alter (Mt Wilson, 
     CA, 60" reflector x700) "Brilliant blue in interior later 
     turning white. Photos obtained. (MBMW has this entry twice for 
     diff. dates because source gave UT date as 23rd.)" NASA 
     catalog  weight=5. NASA catalog ID = #712. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Oct-12 UT 11:49-13:46 Ill=98% Ross_D observed by Harris on 1964-9-20

     nr.Ross D 1964 Sep 20 UTC 04:55-05:00 - Observers: Harris & Cross 
     (Whittler, CA, USA, 19" reflector x250) "Opaque, outgassing, 
     obscuration" NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID #850.


2019-Oct-12 UT 13:35-15:27 Ill=98% Gassendi observed by Miles_H on 1968-6-9

     Gassendi 1968 Jun 09 UT 21:35-21:45 Observer: Miles (UK, 5" 
     refractor x120) "Blink inside NW wall. Trees stopped obs. at 
     2145h. At 2155h no blink vis. (Moore has date as June 6th, 1958
     =misprint? as there weren't blink sys. then. Moon at low alt 
     7deg)." NASA catalog weight=2. NASA catalog ID #1077. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Oct-12 UT 13:50-15:09 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Schroter on 1788-4-19

     Near Aristarchus 1788 Apr 19 UT 20:00? Observed by Schroter 
     (Lilienthal, Germany) Event described as: "Small area very 
     brilliant & other bright spots". No additional references 
     given. NASA Catalog Event #44, NASA Weight=4. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Oct-12 UT 13:53-15:49 Ill=98% Plato observed by Braga_R on 2013-1-25

     On 2013 Jan 25 UT 19:05-19:15 R.Braga (Milan, Italy, 115mm 
     refractor, x267, seeing III, transparency average) observed that 
     Plato in general was normal in appearance, but the east rim was 
     showing a remarkable golden (yellow-golden) hue. This was a 
     repeat illumination observation for a W.E. Fox TLp observation 
     from 1938 Feb 14. The observer was wondering whether they were 
     in some way biased after reading the original report desription 
     - so uncertain over this being a TLP. In view of uncertainty 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-12 UT 14:37-16:34 Ill=98% Plato observed by Fox_WE on 1938-2-14

     Plato 1938 Feb 14 UT 00:25 Observed by Fox (Newark, England, 
     6.5" reflector, x240) "Prominent gold-brown spot on E. wall 
     with yellow glow without definite boundary, spreading over 
     floor." NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #431. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2019-Oct-12 UT 15:13-17:07 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1976-1-15

     Aristarchus 1976 Jan 15 UT 19:30-20:50 Observed by P.W. Foley 
     (Kent, UK, 12" reflector) - Aristarchus was abnormally bright 
     (Cameron suspects that this is a confirmation an explosion 
     effect seen earlier by Greenland: "On 1976 Jan 15 at 19:45Ut 
     Greenland (Crawley, UK, 7x50 binooculars) thought that they 
     saw an "explosion" on the Moon (in the general region of 
     Aristarchus) for a fraction of a second, followed by a bright 
     spot in the same position (not an astronomer). After 
     discussions with others, decided it was a moment of transition 
     to greater intensity (better seeing?). Moore thinks it was 
     atmospheric but says it should be on record. Cmeron's 1978 
     catalog ID=1425 and weight=5". For the Foley report: Cameron 
     1978 catalog TLP ID=1427 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-12 UT 17:24-19:21 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1950-6-29

     Aristarchus 1950 Jun 29 UT 05:20-05:41 Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, 
     MD, USA, 3.5" reflector x100, S=6, T=5) "Strong bluish glare on E..SE 
     wall." NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #529.


2019-Oct-12 UT 17:27-19:24 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Schlegel on 1973-4-16

     Aristarchus 1973 Apr 16 UTC 23:45 Observer Schlegel (52.5N, 9E) 
     equipped with a 60 mm refractor, noticed that Aristarchus was 
     extraordinarily bright.


2019-Oct-12 UT 18:36-20:01 Ill=99% Endymion observed by Provenmire on 1968-6-10

     (65E, 56N) near Endymion & Mare Humboldt 1968 Jun 10 UT 02:35 Observed 
     by Provenmire, Robinson et al. (Hamburg, PA, USA, 6" reflector x105, 
     Seeing=good, alt=20deg) "While waiting for reappearance of Antares from 
     a grazing occultation at 13+/-4deg P.A. saw a prolonged blue flash 
     lasting from minimum of 1/2 to a max. of 2.0 s. Several others along 
     obs. path of several miles also saw it so not a local phenom. (located 
     38 deg from cusp, azimuth=157 deg?)" NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). 
     NASA catalog ID #1078.


2019-Oct-13 UT 12:27-13:14 Ill=100% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Pickering_WH on 1897-6-14

     On 1897 Jun 14 at UT 23:00 Pickering (Cambridge, Mass. USA) observed in 
     "Schroter's valley and the vicinity variations in vapor colum. Break in 
     col. toward F and eruption of crater D. 3.4 d after sunrise". The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=389 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-13 UT 13:43-15:40 Ill=100% Plato observed by Chapman_BW on 1980-10-23

     Plato 1980 Oct 23 UT 21:00(+/- approx 1 hour) Observed by 
     Chapman (Kingston Upon-Thames, UK, 11.5cm refractor, seeing III, 
     transparency poor. No spurious colour seen. During one (or 
     both?) of these sessions, a Moon Blink was used and produced no 
     results on all craters tested on, apart from Plato where the SW 
     corner of the floor was brighter in red, and also visible in 
     white light, but viewing was poor and at the limit for his 
     telescope. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-13 UT 15:03-16:14 Ill=100% Cauchy observed by Pamplona on 1969-7-29

     Cauchy 1969 Jul 29 UT 06:00-06:22 Observed by Claudio 
     Pamplona and Jackson Barbosa (Fortaleza, Brazil, 2" 
     refractor) "very bright and clear(?) pulsating 3,3s,3s with 
     crater illum. then 3s area illum. red & no filter area 
     pulsated for 22m. Confirmed by Jackson (Apollo 11 watch)". 
     NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1193. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3.


2019-Oct-13 UT 15:23-17:08 Ill=100% Torricelli_B observed by Cook_MC on 1993-4-6

     On 1993 Apr 06 at UT23:00 M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK) observed a TLP in 
     Torricelli B - "Noted that it was > yellow but only visible in mauve + 
     yellow combined". The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=460 and the weight=4. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2019-Oct-13 UT 17:04-19:01 Ill=100% Le_Verrier observed by Foley_PW on 1977-2-3

     Helicon A 1977 Feb 03 UT 2009-23:52 Foley and Moore observed the 
     crater to be  changing in brightness. Jewitt and Elms failed to 
     detect this. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-13 UT 17:39-19:33 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1976-1-16

     Aristarchus 1976 Jan 16 UT 22:00-23:15 Observed by P.W. Foley 
     (Wilmington, Kent, UK, seeing II) - Aristarchus was tremendously 
     bright. No colour seen. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-13 UT 18:58-19:48 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Rose_RW on 1973-2-17

     Aristarchus 1973 Feb 17 UTC 22:15-22:45 Observed by Rose, Hunt, 
     Robinson, Coleman (UK) described in the NASA catalog as: "Rose tho't 
     W.rampart was diffuse over 1/3 its length. Alerted Hunt who tho't there 
     was a dark patch (in poor seeing) but the diffuse effect was neg. 
     Robinson tho't things norm. also Coleman(Seeing=poor). Moore thinks not 
     real phenom. Rose used a 14", hunt a 6" and Robinson (and? Coleman) a 
     10" reflector. NASA catalog weight=1 (low). NASA catalog TLP
     ID No. 1363


2019-Oct-13 UT 20:18-20:51 Ill=100% Herodotus observed by Lowe on 1968-8-9

     Herodotus 1968 Aug 09 UTC 02:05-03:45 Observed by Lowe (Springfield, 
     VA, USA) described in the NASA catalog as: "With naked eye saw a bright 
     spot in NW part of Moon; tho't it was Aristarchus, but 7x binoculars 
     showed it to be Herod. which was brighter than Aris! still apparent at 
     0245h, but was normal at 0345h. (at FM, must have been an extraordinary 
     event)". Naked eye and 7x binoculars used. The NASA catalog assigns 
     this a high weight of 4. The NASA catalog TLP ID No. is #1087. 
     Reference for observation is personal communication from the observer 
     to Winified Sawtell Cameron. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-13 UT 20:49-20:51 Ill=100% Schroter observed by Livesey_R on 1974-3-8

     1974 Mar 08 UT 22:55 R. Livesey (Scotland, UK) noted that 
     this crater was reddish, but suspected that it was an optical 
     effect? ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-14 UT 10:57-13:00 Ill=99% Pytheas observed by Sendor_Mark on 1970-6-19 *

     E. of Pytheas in M. Imbrium 1970 Jun 19/20 UTC 23:54-00:23 Observed by 
     Sendor-Mark (Szolnok, Hungary, 4" reflector x 200) "Bright spot nr. 
     Timocharis (on E. Copernican ray?) decreased slowly for next 8min 19 
     sec. At 00:11:05 flared up. After 2nd decreasing, brightened again at 
     00:25:54 after which no variablity. Event was star-like < 3km. No 
     events on 21st." NASA catalog weight=2 (poor). NASA catalog ID=#1262.


2019-Oct-14 UT 12:03-12:18 Ill=99% Kunowsky observed by Gilheany on 1964-9-22

     Kunowsky 1964 Sep 22 UT 03:25-04:30 Observed by Gilheany, Hall, and 
     Johnson (Port Tobacco, MD, USA, 16" reflector, Seeing=good) "Red area 
     detected by Trident's MOON BLINK (MB) device, (Aris. normal)." NASA 
     catalog weight= 5 (very high). NASA catalog ID #852.


2019-Oct-14 UT 12:03-12:47 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1975-2-26

     Aristarcus 1975 Feb 26/27 UTC 21:00-00:30 Observed by: Foley (Kent, UK, 
     12" reflector), Kennedy (Dundee, UK, 8" reflector), Gannon (Middlesex, 
     UK, 6" reflector), Amery (Reading, UK, 10" reflector), Fitton 
     (Lancashire, UK, 8" reflector), Turner (Sussex, UK, 8" reflector) 
     "Foley) Neg. at 2100h. At 2123h NE wall was blue, decr. at 2220h. New 
     spot at 2221h due N. At 2227h blue fr. ENE to N. & faint blue on rim. 
     Interior clear detail, but obscur. at ENE-N, (Kennedy) at 2222h got 
     neg., also at 2229h-2300h. (Gannon) at 2245-2253h got neg. (Amery) at 
     2315h saw crater bright, bands clear, c.p. bright & very bright pt. to 
     NE of c.p. N. wall bluisg gray mist extending into N. part of crater. 
     Got slight blink in red till 2335h. (Fitton) at 2330h saw blue in N. 
     interior but no blink, no obscur. in long exam. Blue varied with 
     position in FOV. Polariz. with many rotations showed normal. Blue only 
     in Aris., none elsewhere till 2359h. (Turner at 2330h got neg. till 
     2359h. (Amery) at 2359h saw most detail clear. Blink distinct in red. 
     At 0030h(27th) saw blue mist now gray, seeing deteriorating. Herod. was 
     normal, (Fitton explains obs. as due to high press. system W. of
     obs with temp. inversions). NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA 
     catalog ID #1399.


2019-Oct-14 UT 13:08-13:17 Ill=99% Lichtenberg observed by Nicolini on 1955-5-7

     Lichtenberg 1955 May 07/08 UT 23:00-01:00 Observer: Jean 
     Nicolini (Brazil). Ref: Azevedo (1962) NASA catalog weight=1, 
     NASA catalog ID 590. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-14 UT 14:07-15:49 Ill=99% Proclus observed by Bartlett on 1957-3-17

     "Proclus D. (Bartlett's designation) appeared as a dark spot, 
     conformable to lts appear. at col. 111.15 deg in '55. Proc. A 
     (Bartlett's designation) completely invisible the ordinarily easy to 
     see. Conspic. a' col.103.78deg in 55' & st 110.1 deg in '55, but also 
     invis. at col. 30.78deg in '56". Cameron 1978 catalog ID 665 and 
     weight=4. Observer based in Baltimore, MD, USA and used a 5" reflectore 
     x180 and S=4 and T=5. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-14 UT 14:16-16:11 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Kufer on 1972-3-30

     Aristarchus 1972 Mar 30 UTC 23:03-23:05 Observed by Kufer (11.5E, 
     48.25N, 110mm reflector) "A sudden brightening, but observations 
     limited by cloud" Ref: Hilbrecht & Kuveler Moon & Planets (1984) Vol 
     30, pp53-61.


2019-Oct-14 UT 14:29-16:11 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1957-3-17

     Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA) described in NASA 
     catalog as: "Strong viol. gl. on EWBS, whole length of E. wall. 
     Dark viol. on nimbus pale viol. on plateau m. Area was hazy -- 
     couldn't focus it. Brilliantly clear nite.3.5(?) reflector x180 
     used. NASA catalog wight=4, NASA catalog ID #665. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Oct-14 UT 14:59-16:20 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by McCord on 1965-10-11

     Mare Crisium 1965 Oct 11 UTC 05:15 Observed by McCord (Mt Wilson, CA, 
     100" reflector + spectrogram) "Line depth ratios a/b (H),, c/d (K) 
     abnormally high compared with 23 other areas (including 
     Aristarchus?)." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID 902.


2019-Oct-14 UT 16:02-17:58 Ill=99% Promontorium_Agarum observed by Unknown_Observer on 1948-8-20

     In 1958 aug 20 at UT 20:00? an unknown observer noticed that 
     Promontorium Agarum appeared filled with fog or mist. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID=510 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-14 UT 16:15-17:48 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Thomas on 1970-4-22

     Aristarchus 1970 Apr 22 UT 07:00 
     Observed by Thomas.


2019-Oct-14 UT 16:43-18:21 Ill=99% Plato observed by Gledhill on 1869-9-21

     Plato 1869 Sep 21-22? UTC 00:00? Observed by Gledhill (Halifax, UK, 9" 
     refractor) "Group I craters-notable illum. accomp. by a single light on 
     a distinct spot. (similar to Aug. obs. & if same phase as Ap 1870, date 
     =22nd.). NASA catalog weight=2 (poor). NASA catalog ID #164.


2019-Oct-14 UT 17:16-18:37 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by McCord on 1965-10-11

     Mare Crisium 1965 Oct 11 UTC 07:32 Observed by McCord (Mt Wilson, 
     CA, 100" reflector + spectrogram) "Line depth ratios a/b (H),, 
     c/d (K) abnormally high compared with 23 other areas (including 
     Aristarchus?)." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog 
     ID 902.


2019-Oct-14 UT 17:36-18:57 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1966-7-4

     Aristarchus 1966 Jul 04 UTC 06:15-06:35 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 5" reflector x142) & by Corralitos Observatory 
     (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector). "S.region of floor was granulated 
     & dull est. at 6 & pale yellow-brown tint. Rest of crater est. 8 bright 
     white. Not confirmed by Corralitos MB" S=5, T=4. NASA catalog weight=4 
     (high). NASA catalog ID #955. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-14 UT 19:18-21:15 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Moore_P on 1969-6-30

     Aristarchus 1969 Jun 30 - Jul 01 UT 23:37-00:00, 00:02-00:05 
     Observers: Moore (Sussex, UK, 12.5" reflector x360), Altizer, 
     Arabanel (Corralitos Obs., Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector) 
     "SE wall was orange, detected by Eng. MB Fading by 2353h, only a 
     trace at 2358h & disappeared at 0000h. Later at 0002-0005h 
     suspected again. Alt. was low. Bluring around crater seen at 
     Corrralitos Obs. in the MB, but immeasurable on photos." NASA 
     catalog ID #1150, NASA weight=2(for Moore), 5 (for Corralitos 
     Obs). ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-14 UT 19:19-20:21 Ill=99% Taruntius observed by Wildey on 1962-9-15

     In 1962 Sep 16 at UT08:05 Wildey, Pohn (Mt Wilson, CA, USA, 60" 
     reflector) Taruntius faded from Vmag-3.21 to 4.04, a 0.82 difference in 
     magnitude in 2.5 hours - a photometric measurement. The average 
     magnitude for this age is 4.03, so therefore the crater had brightened 
     by two times above normal. The Cameron 1978 catalogID=769 and the 
     weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-14 UT 19:24-21:42 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Barcroft on 1939-12-27 *

     Aristarchus 1939 Dec 27 UT 08:00? Observed by Barcroft (Madera, CA, 
     USA, 6" reflector) "Faint bluish mist on inner W. wall (according to 
     Firsoff it was right after SR, but this can't be as age=16d & SR comes 
     at 11d)" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #464.


2019-Oct-14 UT 19:55-21:15 Ill=99% Mare_Crisium observed by McCord on 1965-10-11

     Mare Crisium 1965 Oct 11 UTC 10:10 Observed by McCord (Mt Wilson, CA, 
     100" reflector + spectrogram) "Line depth ratios a/b (H),, c/d (K) 
     abnormally high compared with 23 other areas (including 
     Aristarchus?)." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID 902.


2019-Oct-14 UT 20:34-21:42 Ill=99% Proclus observed by Louderback_D on 1980-10-25

     On 1980 Oct 25 at UT03:53-05:21 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     2.5" refractor, seeing=1-2 and transparency=2) found Proclus to 
     have a slight yelloow tinge on the north wall. the brightness of 
     Proclus was 9 and that of Eimmart 8. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=117 and 
     weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-14 UT 20:34-21:42 Ill=99% Promontorium_Agarum observed by Louderback_D on 1980-10-25

     On 1980 Oct 25 at UT03:53-05:21 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     2.5" refractor, seeing=1-2 and transparency=2) found Promontorium 
     Agarum to have a slight blue tinge - apparently similar to that seen on 
     Eimmart from an earlier date. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=117 and weight=3. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-15 UT 12:40-13:19 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1965-10-12

     Aristarchus (Bartlett, 1965 Oct 12 UTC 02:15-20:25, 5 inch 
     reflector x280) - NASA catalog quotes "Nimbus was only a dark 
     violet hue". NASA catalog weight=4. NASA catalog ID #904. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-15 UT 12:40-13:22 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Robinson_JH on 1975-2-27

     Aristarchus 1975 Feb 27/28 UT 22:00-01:00 Observers: Robinson 
     (Teignmouth, England - 10" reflector), Fitton (Lancashire, England - 
     8" reflector), Amery (Reading, England - 8" reflector), Mills 
     Observatory (Dundee, Scotland, 10" reflector) - NASA catalog states: 
     "Robinson at 2200h got blink on E.wall, stong at 200x till 2225h. 
     (Fitton) at 2200h (moon low) at 200x saw vivid blue to N., vivid yellow 
     & orange to S. in Aris., Proc., Menelaus, & many other bright craters 
     til 2300h. Then Aris. less blue & mare obj. no colors. No blinks in 
     these craters. No obscur. Polariz. normal till 2330h using many 
     rotations. At 2330h Aris. blue in N. but fainter. Only Proc. remained 
     blue till 0020h (28th). Photo-electric scan at 2340h was normal for 
     Aris. (600 microamps) compared with Tycho (900 microamps), total of 10 
     scans. all neg. with 15km resolution. Blink neg. but blue still vis. in 
     N. in white light till 0030h. At 0100h (S=III at 200x) Proc. clear of 
     blue, Aris. nearly clear, blink neg. (Amery) at 2310h saw blue on N.rim 
     of Aris., no color in other craters at 300x. No blink in Aris. S. part 
     of Aris. indistinct but abnormal. No blink till 2350h. (Mills 
     Observatory) at 0000h checking rep'ts got blink in S.part of Aris. Blue 
     only in N.part. Similar blue in bright craters in E.hemisphere & blue 
     halo on S.limb till 0020h. Concluded due to optical effects. Fitton 
     says due to atm. effects from high press. sys. W. of obs (blue on one 
     rim & red on other due to chrom. aberr. ? If spurios, should get no 
     blink & similar crater conditions should exhibit same phenomena all 
     over Moon). NASA catalog weight=5. NASA catalog TLP ID No. 
     1400. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-15 UT 12:40-13:22 Ill=97% Proclus observed by Fitton on 1975-2-27

     Proclus 1975 Feb 27/28 UTC 22:00-01:00 Observers: (Fitton) at 2200h 
     (moon low) at 200x saw vivid blue to N., vivid yellow & orange to S. in 
     Aris., Proc., Menelaus, & many other bright craters til 2300h. Then 
     Aris. less blue & mare obj. no colors. No blinks in these craters. No 
     obscur. Polariz. normal till 2330h using many rotations. Only Proc. 
     remained blue till 0020h (28th). Photo-electric scan at 2340h was 
     normal for Aris. (600 microamps) compared with Tycho (900 microamps), 
     total of 10 scans. all neg. with 15km resolution. Blink neg. but blue 
     still vis. in N. in white light till 0030h. At 0100h (S=III at 200x) 
     Proc. clear of blue, Aris. nearly clear, blink neg. Concluded due to 
     optical effects. Fitton says due to atm. effects from high press. sys. 
     W. of obs (blue on one rim & red on other due to chrom. aberr. ? If 
     spurious, should get no blink &similar crater conditions should exhibit 
     same phenomena all over Moon). NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA 
     catalog TLP ID No. #1400.


2019-Oct-15 UT 14:07-16:04 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1981-10-15

     On 1981 Oct 15 at UT06:03-05:51 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     seeing=1-2 and transparency=5) The Cobra Head had a brightness of 8, 
     though normally it should be less than 7. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=
     156 and weight=3.


2019-Oct-15 UT 14:07-16:04 Ill=97% Mons_Piton observed by Louderback_D on 1981-10-15

     On 1981 Oct 15 at UT06:03-06:51 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 3" 
     refractor, seeing=1-2 and transparency=5) observed that the brightenss 
     of 4 sun lit bright spots differed in red and blue light. "Appeared as 
     a cross. the 2 points A & D on his sketch (index) were affceted. They 
     were 10 pts dimmer in red than blue. Not due to seeing as they did not 
     fluctuate (as did the seeing)." This report came from the Cameron 2006 
     catalog and had an ID No. of 156 and a weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-15 UT 14:59-16:57 Ill=97% Proclus observed by Brook_C on 2009-4-12

     On 2009 Apr 12 at UT 00:00 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, 2" refractor, x25, 
     Edmund Optics filter No. 80 (blue) and No. 47 (light rose/purple)) 
     noted that the rays of Proclus stood out better in light rose/purple 
     than in blue. Not just the rays crossing Mare Crisium. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Oct-15 UT 16:04-18:00 Ill=97% Alphonsus observed by Whippey_MR on 1966-9-2

     Alphonsus 1966 Sep 02 UTC 03:16-04:18 Observed by Whippey (Northolt, 
     UK, 3" refractor) & Corralitos Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" 
     reflector) "A series of weak glows, final flash at 0418h. Not confirmed 
     by Corralitos MB" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID 971.


2019-Oct-15 UT 16:15-17:52 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by Thomas on 1970-4-23

     Aristarchus 1970 Apr 23 UTC 07:00 
     Observed by Thomas


2019-Oct-15 UT 16:44-18:41 Ill=97% Aristarchus observed by LeCroy on 1975-2-28

     Aristarchus and vicinity 1975 Feb 28 UT 03:20-03:45 Observers LeCroy 
     Jr & Sr (Springfield, VA, USA). NASA catalog states: "Orange flash in 
     crater that then spread over whole crater then turned to bluish haze at 
     0320h. Couldn't see surface underneath. All W. hemisphere was brighter 
     than normal. Blue was only on Aris. Rest of Moon was examined for 
     phenom. but none seen elsewhere. Gone by 0343h (just a few hrs after 
     Eng. obs. -- not likely U.S. obs. had temp. inversion high press. sys. 
     W. of him too). 4.5" reflector 45x, 150x. NASA catalog weight=4. 
     NASA catalog TLP ID No. #1401. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Oct-15 UT 19:13-21:09 Ill=96% Plato observed by Kelsey on 1966-9-2

     Plato 1966 Sep 02 UT 0625 Observed by Kelsey (Riverside, California, 
     USA, 8" reflector x300) "Landslip at west would not focus. (Ricker not 
     certain it was a real LTP)." NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog 
     ID 973.


2019-Oct-15 UT 19:38-21:36 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1950-7-2

     In 1950 Jul 02 UT07:22 Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA, 3.5" 
     reflector) saw no dark bands on the inside of Aristarchus, 
     despite detail being seen elsewhere. He would normally have 
     expected to have seen bands at this colongitude, based upon past 
     observations. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-15 UT 20:38-22:23 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Brook_C on 2002-9-23

     On 2002 Sep 23 at UT22:45-23:56 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK) noticed that 
     the bands inside Aristarchus varied (UT22:45-22:56) in definition 
     whilst the rim of Herodotus and the rays of Kepler and Copernicus 
     remained sharp. These bouts of variation were 1-2min in duration. At 
     23:56UT when he checked again the periodic blurrings of the bands were 
     still present. The observer suspected atmospheric effects. M.Cook 
     (Frimley, UK) observed 22:00-22:30 and could see only 2 bands on the 
     west wall - but this may have been because of poor transparancy. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-15 UT 20:48-22:23 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Bartlett on 1964-10-23

     Aristarchus 1964 Oct 23 UTC 02:35-02:45 Observed by Bartlett 
     (Baltimore, MD, USA, 3" refractor, 133 & 200x, S=3-5, T=4) "South floor 
     region granulated, 6 deg bright with very faint trace of pale yellow 
     color; rest of crater 8 deg bright." NASA catalog weight=4 (good), NASA 
     catalog ID #859.


2019-Oct-15 UT 20:54-22:12 Ill=96% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1983-10-23

     Aristarchus 1983 Oct 23 UT 19:00-01:30 Observer: Foley (Kent, UK, 
     12" reflector, seeing=II) noiced at 19:00UT an extended bright 
     spot on E wall and extending beyond. This was brighter than other 
     areas of the crater. There was also occasional star-like 
     glistening. Foley comments that the inside of Aristarchus was 
     slightly obscured. The TLP started fading from UT20:30 and 
     finished by 01:30UT. six out of nine independent observers 
     confirmed the effects seen. In total 14 observers observed, 9 
     reported back and 6 found abnormalities in Aristarcus though all 
     encountered variable seeing conditions - some had spurious 
     colour. Cameron comments that this was one of the best 
     recorded/confirmed TLP events. All CED brightness measurements 
     obtained were very high. Moore, Nicolson and Clarke (5" refractor 
     and 15" reflector, 230-350xseeing III) found the crater to be 
     very bright at 19:11UT through a 5" refractor and there was a 
     blob on the east rim (Bartlet's EWBS?) at 19:14UT. Nicolson also 
     saw a very bright star-like area on the eastern wall but this was 
     not defined as it usually is. The crater was also very bright at 
     22:43UT using the 15" reflector available to these observers. At 
     01:07UT they used a Moon blink and discovered that the bright 
     region was bright in blue light and less bright in red - although 
     this was not a detactable blink when switching rapidly between 
     filters. They found that the crater had returned to normal by 
     01:15UT. M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, seeing III-IV) observed a large 
     diffuse spot on the east of the crater that was brighter in blue 
     than in red light and the CED device gave a high reading. J.D. 
     Cook (Frimley, UK, seeing III-IV) made a skecth that showed the 
     bright spot extended on the east wall - again the CED reading was 
     high and a lot of detail was visible on the floor. A.C. Cook 
     (Frimley, UK, seeing III-IV) also noted remarkable detail and the 
     bright (as confirmed by CED) blob on the eastern rim. G. North 
     (Sussex, UK, seeing III-II) also confirmed the bright blob on the 
     eastern wall. Wooller found the north west wall was a dirty 
     yellow colour - though no colour was seen elsewhere in or outside 
     the crater. Mosely found the crater to be bright and his sketch 
     revealed the extension of the bright blob on the eastern rim and 
     again a great deal of interior detail. Amery (Reading, UK, seeing 
     III) found Aristarchus to be "a brilliant splash against dulled 
     background in violet filter, especially polarizing filter. CED + 
     polarizer readings high, but not as high as previous night". 
     Mobberley (Suffolk, UK, seeing III-IV) remarked that "spurious 
     colour a total mess around Aristarchus & nothing abnormal seen". 
     A photograph was taken at 20:50UT reveals the  bright blob and 
     entire detail. Peters (Kent, UK, seeingIII-II) observed  
     Aristarchus with a UV screen from 20:15-21:23UT and comented that 
     althogh being very bright, there was no variation between white 
     and UV. It was checked with a Moon Blink device and the radial 
     bands were  clearly seen in white light, < in blue. The Cameron 
     2008 catalog ID=233 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Oct-15 UT 21:39-22:23 Ill=96% Moon observed by Spinrad on 1962-9-16

     In 1962 Sep 16 at UT08:05 Spirad (Victoria, B.C., Canada, 48" 
     reflector) obtained a spectrum with a UV emission, in H & K lines 
     compared to Jupiter and Mars. II-AO plates, 6A/mm dispersion. 
     Fraunhofer lines much shallower than planetary ones. (whole
     Moon). The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=770 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=4.


2019-Oct-16 UT 13:19-13:41 Ill=93% Gassendi observed by Moseley_T on 1966-9-2

     Gassendi 1966 Sep 02 UT 22:55-02:55 Observed by Moseley, Moore, 
     Gill, Harris, Frost and Hall (Armagh, Northern Ireland, 10" 
     refractor + Moon Blink, Seeing=fair) and by Cave (England using 
     a Moon blink) "Eng. Moonblink sys. detected red glows on c.p. & 
     around it; seen vis. too. (Corralitos obs.at the time? did not 
     see anything?)" Note that the Arnagh observers were all using 
     the same telesope, The observing times of M. Cave are not given 
     but they saw a blink SW of the central peaks. NASA catalog ID 
     972. NASA catalog weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-16 UT 13:19-13:53 Ill=93% Atlas observed by Pither_CM on 1969-8-1

     Atlas 1969 Aug 01 UT 03:36-04:00 Observed by Pither 
     (Nottinghamshire, England) NASA catalog reports: "Eng. moon 
     blink in crater at 0336h close to E. wall, NE of central 
     feature. Oval in shape & dirty brownish color & hazy. Started 
     fading at 0345h but may have been due to dawn, Neg results on 
     other features, (Apollo 11 watch)." 12" x450 reflector used. 
     NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog TLP ID No. #1195. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-16 UT 14:02-15:58 Ill=93% Gassendi observed by Moore_P on 1966-9-3

     Gassendi 1966 Sep 03 UT 01:11-01:46 Observers: Moore (Armagh, N. 
     Ireland, 5 & 12" reflectors), Moseley (Armagh, N. Ireland, 10" 
     refractor), Corralitos Observatory (B.Middlehurst, Organ Pass, 
     NM, USA, 24" reflector), Cave , Gill (UK? 6" reflector x365), 
     "Eng. moon blink sys. detected red glows on c.p. & round it. 
     Independently seen by Cave. Not confirmed by Corralitos M.B." 
     NASA catalog ID#975, NASA weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Oct-16 UT 14:03-14:57 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by Pamplona on 1969-8-1

     Aristarchus 1969 Aug 01 UTC 04:40-05:38 Observed by C. Pamplona 
     e J. Barbosa(Fortaleza, Brazil using 12" x235 and 5" x100 
     reflectors) - NASA catalog reports: "Enhanced area in SE wall, 
     no pulsation, no color. Usually NW wall is brightest. After 
     0538h NW region was brightest again, (Apollo 11 watch, indep. 
     confirm. ?)" NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog TLP ID No. #
     1196. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-16 UT 15:25-17:22 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Scarfe on 1963-10-5

     In 1963 Oct 05/06 at UT 23:35-00:45 Scarfe (Cambridge, UK, 36" 
     reflector, transparency: hazy - high cirrus) observed very strong 
     luminescence at 50% of the total light (recorded photo-electrically) at 
     Hydrogen alpha (656nm), Sodium-D (589nm) and Fe(RMT 15) 539.71nm, 
     542.97nm, 543.45nm, 544.69nm, 550.15nm, and 550.68nm. The Cameron 1978 
     catalog ID= and weight=5. The effect was especially strong in 
     Aristarchus at 545.0nm. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=776 and weight=5. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=5.


2019-Oct-16 UT 15:25-17:22 Ill=92% Copernicus observed by Scarfe on 1963-10-5

     In 1963 Oct 05/06 at UT 23:35-00:45 Scarfe (Cambridge, UK, 36" 
     reflector, transparency: hazy - high cirrus) observed very strong 
     luminescence in Copernicus at 50% of the total light (recorded photo-
     electrically) at Hydrogen alpha (656nm), Sodium-D (589nm) and Fe(RMT 
     15) 539.71nm, 542.97nm, 543.45nm, 544.69nm, 550.15nm, and 550.68nm. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and weight=5. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=776 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Oct-16 UT 15:25-17:22 Ill=92% Kepler observed by Scarfe on 1963-10-5

     In 1963 Oct 05/06 at UT 23:35-00:45 Scarfe (Cambridge, UK, 36" 
     reflector, transparency: hazy - high cirrus) observed very strong 
     luminescence in Kepler at 50% of the total light (recorded photo-
     electrically) at Hydrogen alpha (656nm), Sodium-D (589nm) and Fe(RMT 
     15) 539.71nm, 542.97nm, 543.45nm, 544.69nm, 550.15nm, and 550.68nm. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and weight=5. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=776 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-16 UT 16:15-17:55 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Thomas on 1970-4-24

     Aristarchus 1970 Apr 24 UTC 07:00 
     Observed by Thomas


2019-Oct-16 UT 16:45-18:43 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Kozyrev on 1961-11-25

     Aristarchus 1961 Nov 27 UTC 23:30 Observed by Kozyrev (Crimea, Soviet 
     Union) described in NASA catalog as: "Emission lines in spectrum of 
     c.p. in red & blue, H2 identified, (he had obtained C2 & Swan bands in 
     Alphonsus in '58 & '59" 50" reflector used. NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog TLP ID No. #755.


2019-Oct-16 UT 17:33-17:57 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Brook_C on 2009-6-11

     On 2009 Jun 11 at UT01:00-01:15 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, 2" refractor, 
     x25, seeing excellent and no cloud or haze) obsrved fluctuations in the 
     brightness of Aristarchus crater. No brightness fluctuations were seen 
     elsewhere. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-16 UT 20:59-22:24 Ill=92% Aristarchus observed by Gennatt on 1964-8-26

     Aristarchus 1964 Aug 26 UT 02:00-03:00 Observed by Genatt, Reid,
     (Greenbelt, MD, 16" reflector, x360, S=P-G), and Lindenblad 
     (Washington, DC, USA, 26" refractor) "Red and Blue bands. Grew 
     thinner & shorter. Alerted Naval Obs. One obs. tho't he saw 
     Phenom. but not sure. (confirmation ?). (prof. astronomers, but 
     not lunar observers)" NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA 
     catalog ID #844. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-16 UT 21:31-22:24 Ill=92% Unknown observed by Unknown_Observer on 1957-2-18

     In 1957 Feb 10 at UT 22:00 an unnamed observer repirted a TLP somewhere 
     on the Moon. The reference for this comes from: Palm, A. 1967, Icarus,&
     (2), p188-192. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=662 and weight=0. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-17 UT 15:06-17:03 Ill=86% Plinius observed by Thury on 1889-9-13

     Plinius 1889 Sep 13 UTC 23:00? Observed by Thury (Geneva, 
     Switzerland) NASA Catalog Event #265, NASA Weight=3 (Average) 
     Event described as: "Unusual black spot with intensely white 4" 
     border over CP. Normal aspect is 2 craters. #260 says that 
     Gaudibert saw same thing in Sep. - confirmed". References: 
     Nature 41, 183, 1890 (April). The ALPO/BAA weight=1, this is 
     probably perfectly normal.


2019-Oct-17 UT 15:11-17:05 Ill=86% Plato observed by Marshall_KP on 1982-9-7

     Plato 1982 Sep 07 UT 0330-0430. K.P. Marshall (Columbia, 12" 
     reflector, seeing III) saw no craterlets on the floor of Plato, 
     but what he considered unusual was an extremely bright short 
     section of the north rim of Plato - far brighter than, any other 
     part of the rim, and only slightly less bright than Mons Piton. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-17 UT 16:04-17:30 Ill=86% Plato observed by Markov on 1915-4-3

     Plato 1915 Apr 03 UTC 23:00? Observed by Markov (Russia) NASA 
     catalog describes observation: "Appearance of bright spots 
     that could even be seen in a 43mm (2-in) tube" 2" refractor 
     used. NASA catalog weight=2. NASA catalog TLP ID NO. #350. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-17 UT 16:56-18:22 Ill=86% Plato observed by Lihou on 1886-10-16

     1886 Oct 16 UTC 22:00 Observed by Lihou (France?) "Unusual phenomena ? 
     (drawing)" Ref Sirius, Vol 20, 45 p69 (1887). NASA catalog weight=1 
     (very low). NASA catalog ID #252. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-17 UT 18:21-20:18 Ill=86% Plato observed by Foley_PW on 1975-3-2

     On 1975 Mar 02 at UT05:00-06:18 P.W.Foley (Wilmington, Dartford, 
     Kent, UK, 12" reflector) observed blueness along the southern 
     wall of Plato. This is a BAA observation. Note that it
     is assumed that this is the same as Cameron's catalog 1975 
     Mar 02 UT 01:00 or 23:00 report by an Unknown English Observer 
     who  apparently observed colour in Plato (Red or violet). The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1402 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Oct-18 UT 14:50-16:15 Ill=79% Unknown observed by Von_Speisssen on 1888-11-23

     On 1888 Nov 23 at 16:15-17:00 UT Von Speissen & others of Berlin, 
     Germany, using a 3.5" refractor (x180), saw a "Triangular patch of 
     light (time in Middlehurst catalog wrong? Moonrise was at > 18:30h. If 
     year =1887, age=8.8 days & time OK. must be same observation as ID=256 
     in Cameron 1978 catalog - note similarity of names and also the 
     reference date). Cameron 1978 catalog ID=258 and weight=1.


2019-Oct-18 UT 16:44-19:44 Ill=78% Agrippa observed by Bartlett on 1966-9-5 *

     Agrippa 1966 Sep 05 UTC 04:47-05:00 Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, 
     MD, USA, 5" reflector, 283x) "Within the wall shadow, the landslip was 
     faintly illum., est. at 4, & distinctly brownish". S=6-1, T=3-1. NASA 
     catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #975.


2019-Oct-18 UT 16:46-18:41 Ill=78% Posidonius observed by Muller on 1890-10-3

     On 1890 Oct 03 at UT 22:00 Muller of Germany saw in Posidonius an 
     unusual shadow (Moon low? and crater in dark part-terminator 2 deg past 
     west wall - according to Cameron). Cameron 1978 catalog ID=267 and 
     weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-18 UT 18:41-20:38 Ill=78% Aristarchus observed by Kozyrev on 1961-11-27

     Aristarchus 1961 Nov 27 UTC 23:30 Observed by Kozyrev (Crimea, Soviet 
     Union) described in NASA catalog as: "Emission lines in spectrum of 
     c.p. in red & blue, H2 identified, (he had obtained C2 & Swan bands in 
     Alphonsus in '58 & '59" 50" reflector used. NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog TLP ID No. #755.


2019-Oct-18 UT 18:42-20:32 Ill=78% Mare_Tranquillitatis observed by Arkhipov on 1985-9-4

     On 1985 Sep 04 at UT 22:15 A.V. Arkhipov (Russia) detected a bright 
     flash in Mare Tranquilitatis that lasted < 1 second and had a diameter 
     of < 2 arc seconds i.e. the limit of seeing resolution. The Cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=280 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-18 UT 21:58-22:24 Ill=77% Alphonsus observed by Brook_C on 2002-9-27

     Alphonsus 2002 Sep 27 UT 00:00-02:15 Observed by Clive Brook (Plymouth, 
     UK) "Central peak was bright 00:00 UT but had faded by at least 2 deg 
     on the Schroter scale - no colour seen. Observer continued observing
     until 02:15 UT but central peak had dimmed considerably by then"


2019-Oct-19 UT 16:24-17:57 Ill=69% Alphonsus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1958-12-2

     On 1958 Dec 02 at UT 06:00 an unknown observer detected a TLP on the 
     Moon. The reference for this is from Palm, 1967 Icarus. The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=709 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-19 UT 17:05-19:02 Ill=69% Plato observed by Foley_PW on 1975-3-4

     On 1975 Mar 04 at UT03:46-06:01 P.W.Foley (Wilmington, Dartford, 
     Kent, UK, 12" reflector) observed bluesness along the southern 
     wall of Plato.  This is a BAA observation. The Cameron 1978 
     catalogue ID is #1403 and has a weight of 1. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Oct-19 UT 17:20-19:17 Ill=69% Aristarchus observed by Foley_PW on 1975-3-4

     On 1975 Mar 04 UT 04:01-05:30 P.W. Foley (Wilmington, Dartford, Kent, 
     UK, 12" reflector, seeing excellent, no turbulence, slight frost and 
     mist) had a suspicion of blue on the entire north wall of Aristarchus 
     crater - not seen visually but detected with a Moon Blink device. 
     Crater extremely bright and unable to penetrate it visually. 
     Surrounding areas charp. No red/orange on south wall. All other areas 
     proved negative. Photographs taken. No change in appearance over this 
     time. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-19 UT 18:02-18:59 Ill=68% Cassini observed by McLarin on 1965-10-16

     1965 Oct 16 UTC 08:05-10:00 Observed by McLarin (Huntsville, AL, 20" 
     reflector), Bates, Hall (Prt. Tobacco, MD, 16" reflector), Hardie 
     (Nashville, TE, 30" reflector) "Color flashing pulsations 
     intermittently detected by Trident MB device in Huntsville but not seen 
     in Md, or vis. by Hardie when alerted. Pulsations in Cassini different 
     from atmosphere" NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #906.


2019-Oct-19 UT 19:57-21:54 Ill=68% Montes_Spitzbergen observed by Madej_P on 1980-10-30

     On 1980 Oct 30 at UT03:19-03:41 P. Madej (Huddersfield, UK, 158mm f/4 
     reflector, seeing I-II, and transparency very good. Wratten 15 (yellow) 
     and Wratten 35 (purple) used. No spurious colour seen). At 03:19UT, the 
     observer noted that Mons Spitzbergen looked sharper at x52. At x72 
     bright flashes of a bright lunar gray to a light orange colour seen. 
     BAA Lunar Section TLP team alerted. At 03:32UT a yellow filter used and 
     the flashes were better seen, one flash approximately 20-30 sec apart. 
     At 03:31UT Madej used a purple filter and could not see Mons 
     Spitzbergen but did see the flashes (45-60 sec apart). cameron 2006 
     catalog TLP ID=118 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-19 UT 21:38-22:25 Ill=68% Plato observed by Butler_FC on 1980-10-30

     Plato 1980 Oct 30 UT 05:00-0704 Observed by F.C. Butler (SW 
     London, UK, seeing III, but worsening (but not as bad as IV) 
     towards the end of the observing period, transparency 100% 
     clear, 22cm Newtonian reflector, x144, x185). The floor seemed 
     quite devoid of detail, apart from a vague mottling seen during 
     the briefest moments of best seeing conditions. At the start of 
     the observing period he could just glimpse the central craterlet 
     at x185, but could not be sure. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-20 UT 16:37-17:50 Ill=58% Aristarchus observed by Crotts_A on 1979-12-11

     On 1979 Dec 11 at 05:05-05:28 UT A. Crotts (Princton, NJ, USA, CCD 
     camera and spectrophotometer) "Spectral Photometer recording - digital 
     pics. With spectral slit. CED eff 2%." Cameron 2006 catalog ID=77 and 
     weight=5. 


2019-Oct-20 UT 16:37-17:50 Ill=58% Mersenius observed by Crotts_A on 1979-12-11

     On 1979 Dec 11 at 05:05-05:28 UT A. Crotts (Princton, NJ, USA, CCD 
     camera and spectrophotometer) TLP detected in Mersenius : "Spectral 
     Photometer recording - digital pics. With spectral slit. CED eff 2%." 
     Cameron 2006 catalog ID=77 and weight=5. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Oct-20 UT 19:32-20:20 Ill=58% Copernicus observed by Darling_D on 1994-4-3

     On 1994 Apr 03 at 11:23UT D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA) noticed that 
     Copernicus crater had a red spot on the west wall (found using Moon 
     Blink filters Wratten 29 and Wratten 38). The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Oct-20 UT 21:19-22:25 Ill=57% Alphonsus observed by Alter on 1958-12-3

     Alphonsus 1958 Dec 03 UTC 11:00? Observed by Alter, Mt Wilson, CA, USA, 
     60" reflector "Photog. spect. showed floor of crater redder than 
     neighboring areas outside its walls. (Palm had a rep't for this date -- 
     same area?). NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID #710.


2019-Oct-20 UT 16:57-22:01 Ill=57% Earthshine: Orionids: ZHR=25 vel=66km/s

2019-Oct-21 UT 17:36-18:19 Ill=47% Aristarchus observed by George on 1965-10-18

     Aristarchus 1965 Oct 18 UTC 07:30-07:36 Observed by George, Dervas 
     (Huntsville, Alabama, 20" reflector x125) "Color with intermittent 
     displays, detected with Trident MB device. Observers dubious. NASA 
     catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #907.


2019-Oct-21 UT 19:40-21:36 Ill=46% Plato observed by Hobdell on 1981-10-21

     On 1981 Oct 21 at UT 11:35-11:48 B. Hobdell (St Petersberg, FL, USA, 
     10" reflector) found that the south peak of Plato on floor glowed white 
     at 11:35UT, then a milky shade spread all aorind Plato's floor 
     (previously completely shadow filled). The needle like shadows started 
     to be indistiguishable through the sunlight (dawn on Earth). The cloud 
     like feature was washed out by daylight at 11:48UT and conformed to the 
     "white area except a tail that reached the cetre of Plato" Spurious 
     colour was not seen. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=157 and weight=3.


2019-Oct-21 UT 21:45-22:26 Ill=46% Aristarchus observed by Louderback_D on 1981-10-21

     On 1981 Oct 21 at UT13:40-13:45 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     10" reflector) observed a cloud on the north east quadrant of 
     Aristarchus crater, and also covered the bright spot on the east wall 
     (Cameron says that the east wall bright spot is Bartlett's "EWBS". 
     Louderback mentions that this TLP gave Aristarchus a diamond ring 
     effect. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=157 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2. 


2019-Oct-21 UT 17:34-22:01 Ill=46% Earthshine: Orionids: ZHR=25 vel=66km/s

2019-Oct-22 UT 18:36-18:53 Ill=36% Aristarchus observed by Gilheany on 1965-8-21

     1965 Aug 21 UTC 06:55-08:05 Observed by Gilheany, Johnson, Segerstrom 
     (Port Tobacoo, MD, USA) described in the NASA catalog as: "Color patch 
     detected by Trident; MB device. Color was pink. Astronauts on Gemini 5 
     saw terrestrial auroras from space on this date". 16" reflector used. 
     NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID No.#890.


2019-Oct-22 UT 18:36-18:54 Ill=36% Aristarchus observed by Moseley_R on 1983-8-3

     Aristarchus 1983 Aug 03 UT 0305-0400 Observed by R,Moseley 
     (Coventry, UK, 6" reflector, seeing II, Transparency very good). 
     At the start of the observation, the NE wall and immediate 
     exterior was the brightest area visible (this is normal) and 
     seemed tinged with a faint blue/violet. At 03:45 the impression 
     of colour was fading in the brightening sky, but by 03:55 the 
     colour was back again with a faint violet/purple surrounding the 
     whole formation from E clockwise to N. The observer found it 
     difficult to decide whether it was really a colour on the Moon, 
     or an optical illusion. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-22 UT 18:36-22:02 Ill=34% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Oct-23 UT 21:06-22:27 Ill=24% Aristarchus observed by Kozyrev on 1961-12-3 *

     Aristarchus 1961 Dec 3 UTC 03:05-03:40 Observed by Kozyrev (Crimea, 
     Soviet Union) described in NASA catalog as: "Emission lines in spectrum 
     of c.p. red & blue, H2 identified, several km2 area. Projected into 
     shadow cast by W. wall. Source rose to a height above the crater. 50" 
     reflector used NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog TLP ID 
     No. #756.


2019-Oct-23 UT 19:38-22:02 Ill=24% Earthshine: Leo Minorids: ZHR=2 vel=62km/s

2019-Oct-24 UT 21:54-22:27 Ill=14% N_Pole observed by Chernov_VM on 1977-12-7

     On 1977 Dec 07 at 04:24UT (assuming that this is not local time) V.M. 
     Chernov (Soviet Union) observed that the north cusp was more than 180 
     deg and a bright dot seen. Ashen light visible. Moon 3.5 days before 
     New Moon. On 6th Dec at 04:20UT the cusp was seen to be normal. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-24 UT 21:54-22:27 Ill=14% S_Pole observed by Chernov_VM on 1977-12-7

     On 1977 Dec 07 at 04:24UT (assuming that this is not local time) V.M. 
     Chernov (Soviet Union) observed that the south cusp was more than 180 
     deg. Ashen light visible. Moon 3.5 days before New Moon. On 6th Dec at 
     04:20UT the cusp was seen to be normal. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-24 UT 20:40-22:03 Ill=14% Earthshine: Leo Minorids: ZHR=2 vel=62km/s

2019-Oct-25 UT 21:43-22:28 Ill=7% S_Pole observed by Chernov_VM on 1977-12-8

     On 1977 Dec 08 at 04:04UT V.M. Chernov (Soviet Union) observed that the 
     south cusp was prolongated into Ashen light. This is the only occasion 
     where he had seen this effect on two successive nights. However a 
     similar effect was seen by F. Gruihuisen on 1840 Mar 5th and 6th. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-25 UT 21:43-22:03 Ill=7% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Oct-30 UT 09:45-09:59 Ill=7% S_Pole observed by Hill_H on 1992-4-4

     Southern cusp obseved by H.Hill (UK) on 1992 Apr 04 at solar 
     selenographic colongitude=294.Observer noted that the southern 
     cusp was extended by 350" - the effect appeared "atmospheric". 
     Note that this is almost certianly not a TLP but is worth 
     checking out if the libration and solar colongitude is similar, 
     just to verify that this is what the Moon normally looks like. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-30 UT 09:55-09:59 Ill=7% Aristarchus observed by Manske_R on 1988-4-18

     On 1988 Apr 18 at UT 19:00 R. Manske (Madison, WI, USA) observed that 
     Aristarchus? was glowing in Earthshine. Weier (Madison, WI, USA) 
     detected it easily in 7x50 binouculars. Spain (Fairfield, KY, USA) 
     though detected no TLP, nor could he see Aristarchus. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=324 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-31 UT 09:44-10:46 Ill=13% Aristarchus observed by Celis on 1970-5-8

     On 1970 May 08 at UT 23:00-23:30 Celis (Quilpue, Chile, 3" refractor, 
     x60, atmosphere turbulent) observed in the Aristarchus region a clear 
     line(?) and several star-like points. Cameron suspects atmospheric 
     effects due to low altitude and turbulence? The Cameron 1978 catalog 
     ID=1259 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Oct-31 UT 09:44-10:02 Ill=13% Gassendi observed by Graham_F on 1990-4-28

     On 1990 Apr 28 at UT 00:00-00:30 F. Graham (Marshall TWP, OH, USA, 6" 
     reflector) during a failed attempt to observe the occultation of X6493 
     that was thwarted by clouds, noticed that Gassendi was "Gass,>>,>Aris 
     or anything else". The crater had a "milky lustre". It is possible that 
     another occultation observing group may have a video of the Earthshine 
     at this time. Darling (Sun prairem WI, USA, 20x50 binoculars) could not 
     see Earthsine, though the sky was bright at the time. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=402 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2019-Oct-31 UT 09:44-10:46 Ill=13% Gassendi observed by Graham_F on 1990-4-28

     On 1990 Apr 28 at UT 01:19-01:25 F. Graham (Marshall TWP, OH, USA, 6" 
     reflector) during a failed attempt to observe the occultation of X6493 
     that was thwarted by clouds, noticed that Gassendi was "Gass,>>,>Aris 
     or anything else". The crater had a "milky lustre". It is possible that 
     another occultation observing group may have a video of the Earthshine 
     at this time. Darling (Sun prairem WI, USA, 20x50 binoculars) could not 
     see Earthsine, though the sky was bright at the time. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=402 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2019-Oct-31 UT 10:22-10:46 Ill=13% Aristarchus observed by Celis on 1970-7-6

     On 1970 Jul 06 at UT 22:45-23:45 Celis (Paso Hondo, Chile, 3" 
     refractor, x60, x100, x135, seeing=very good) saw Aristarchus as an 
     outstanding bright patch (10 deg bright) electric blue colour, every 10 
     sec groups of 3 or 4 separate sparkles for 10sec then a period of calm 
     for 30sec-1min. At 130x was almost constant form. Sometimes the form 
     would be radial like an open band with extended fingers. This was 
     observed in the dark part of the Moon and Cameron suspects atmopsheric 
     effects. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1264 and weight=2. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Oct-31 UT 10:26-10:46 Ill=13% Plato observed by Robinson_JH on 1980-11-10

     On 1980 Nov 10 UT 17:55-18:15 J-H Robinson (Teighmouth, Devon, UK) 
     observed the floor patches in Plato to be easy in red, but not so well 
     seen in blue. This is a BAA Lunar Section report. ALPO/BAA weight=1.
     Note the month or day must be wrong!


2019-Oct-31 UT 10:36-10:46 Ill=13% Manilius observed by Robinson_JH on 1980-11-10

     On 1980 Nov 10 at UT18:05 J-H Robinson (Teighmouth, Devon, UK, Seeing 
     III, Transparency poor, Filters Wratten 25 (red) and 44A(blue)) found 
     the area to be bright in red and dull in blue - but suspected that this 
     might have been a permanent colour blink e.g. natural colour. This does 
     not have an entry in the 2006 Cameron catalog. ALPO/BAA weight=1. 


2019-Oct-31 UT 10:11-10:48 Ill=13% Earthshine: sporadic meteors