TLP Repeat Illumination/Libration and Earthshine predictions for: Argentina - Buenos_Aires



Ill is percentage illumination of the Moon
*Indicates a repeat illumination and libration event to within +/- 1 deg for both
A non-* indicates just repeat illumination to within +/-0.5 deg


2019-Jan-01 UT 07:22-08:48 Ill=21% Moon observed by Darling_D on 1979-9-16

     On 1979 Sep 16 at UT 08:00-09:00 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5" reflector, x62-x97, clear, but Moon at low altitude) detected 
     four new features that he had not seen before in Earthsine in 
     comparison with what he saw on 16 Jul 1979, this time in the southern 
     part of the Moon. pin-point flashes were seen within these bluish 
     areas. Each time a flash occurred the gas clouds brightened (sometimes 
     by 6x) for a few seconds. Cameron thinks that these are related to 
     moving clouds on the Earth's limb e.g. mackeral sky. Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=69 and weight=1. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-01 UT 08:12-08:48 Ill=20% Briggs_A observed by Butler_FC on 1980-2-11

     Briggs A 1980 Feb 11 UT 06:30-07:00 Observed bt Butler_FC 
     (Brixton, UK, 22cm Newtonian reflector, x64, x104, seeing IV). 
     Found Briggs A to be brownish in colour at x64, however the 
     colour vanished at 06:55 when x104 was used. Switching back to 
     x64 the colour was still there but fainter. The colour fade may 
     have been due to day light glare encroaching? Could not see this 
     effect anywhere else on the Moon but did detect what he regarded 
     as a permanent coloured spot (yellow) between Cruger and 
     Grimaldi. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-01 UT 07:22-08:16 Ill=20% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Jan-02 UT 08:00-08:12 Ill=13% Aristarchus observed by Gobel on 1824-1-27

     On 1824 Jan 27 at UT03:00 Gobel (Koburg, Germany) observed a reddish 
     colour in Aristarchus crater. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=98 and the 
     weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-02 UT 08:00-08:17 Ill=13% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Jan-03 UT 07:13-08:18 Ill=7% Earthshine: Quadrantids: ZHR=120 (vel=41km/s

2019-Jan-04 UT 07:46-08:19 Ill=3% Earthshine: Quadrantids: ZHR=120 (vel=41km/s

2019-Jan-08 UT 23:06-23:16 Ill=7% Mare_Tranquillitatis observed by Dezmelyk on 1971-2-27

     On 1971 Feb 27 at UT 23:50-00:00 Dezmelyk (Newtown Square, 
     Pennsylvania, 2" refractor, x225, x500, seeing=good) observed in 
     Earthshine a peculiar white glow too far from the terminator to be 
     sunlit. 9 minutes later they could not detect this, nor any other 
     spots. The spot concerned was about 8-9th magnitude - "like galaxies". 
     They checked the lens for dirt but it was clean. A drawing was 
     provided. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1285 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Jan-09 UT 23:45-23:52 Ill=13% Aristarchus observed by Barcroft on 1950-4-21

     On 1950 Apr 21 at UT 03:30 Barcroft (Madera, CA, USA, 10" 
     reflector x74 & x98) observed that Aristarchus glowed in 
     Earthshine. However Earthshine visibility was exceptionally goo. 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=525 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Jan-09 UT 23:40-23:54 Ill=13% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Jan-10 UT 23:44-00:25 Ill=20% Aristarchus observed by Barcroft on 1950-4-22

     On 1950 Apr 22 at UT 03:15-0440 Barcroft (Madera, CA, USA, 10" 
     reflector x74 & x98) observed that Aristarchus glowed in 
     Earthshine. However Earthshine visibility was exceptionally 
     good. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=526 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Jan-10 UT 23:40-00:27 Ill=20% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Jan-11 UT 23:06-00:13 Ill=28% Mare_Crisium observed by Moore_P on 1948-10-8

     1948 Oct 08 UT 21:00? Barker's Quadrangle (SE Mare Crisium) 
     Observer: Moore (UK, 12?" reflector) "Nebulous white patch in 
     place of quadrangle. (In Capuanus ? See Wilkins & Moore, The 
     Moon, p124. Area in darkness" NASA catalog ID #511. NASA catalog 
     weight=4. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-11 UT 23:31-00:56 Ill=28% Posidonius observed by McConnell_J on 1968-4-3

     Posidonius 1968 Apr 03/04 UT 22:29-00:15 Observed by McConnell 
     (Antrim, N.Ireland, 3.5" refractor, x117, S=E) "Peculiarhaziness 
     in NE (ast. ?) corner of crater. Greenish-yellow tint similar to 
     M.Crisium at FM. Central crater was clearly vis. N.wall showed 
     no detail at all." NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1064. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-12 UT 00:14-00:56 Ill=28% Aristarchus observed by _R_ on 1883-11-5

     A German observer by the pseudonym of "R" on 1883 Nov 05 UT 18:00 saw 
     Aristarchus as a vry bright 7-8th magnitude star in the dark part of 
     the Moon. The Cameron 1978 catalog assigns this event an ID of 240 and 
     a weight of 3. The ALPO/BAA weight is 1.


2019-Jan-11 UT 23:39-00:58 Ill=29% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Jan-12 UT 23:06-23:28 Ill=37% Aristarchus observed by Madej_P on 1985-4-26

     Aristarchus appeared to glow in Earthshine with a faint 
     green luminescence that moved from side to side. A bright
     blue central spot was also seen. The green colour was detected
     in two seperate eyepieces.  Observation made from England.
     Cameron 2006 catalog extension ID=266 and weight=2. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-13 UT 01:00-01:25 Ill=38% Aristarchus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Jan-13 UT 01:00-01:25 Ill=38% Campanus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Jan-13 UT 01:00-01:25 Ill=38% Hecataeus observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Jan-13 UT 01:00-01:25 Ill=38% Hevelius observed by Johnson_G on 1985-4-26

     G Johnson of Swanton, MD, USA used a 2" refractor at f/12.
     Aristachus revealed as a red spot on a photo of the Moon. This
     was similar to another photo obtained on 1988 Apr 21st. Frame (with 3
     exposures present)reveals a dim star like point near Campanus on 
     exposure 1. Expsoure 2 shows it a little east on the Earth-lit 
     part. Exposure 3 shows it off the south-east limb. Apparently 20
     minutes later took 2 exposures and frame 18 was a double. The
     second exposure revealed an object farther from the limb but the
     first exposure does not show the object. The two high power exposures 
     do not show it. Cameron could not see the spots that Johson describes
     on his slides, but did see several spots (defects?) on the 
     8 and 12 second exposures near Hevelius and also on the 20 second
     exposure near to Hecataeus only. BAA members observed star like 
     flashes a few hours earlier - near Aristarchus. One BAA member, Madej, 
     had seen a green glow in Arisarchus in two places in two eyepieces.
     Cameron 2006 Catalog extension ID=265 and weight=2. 


2019-Jan-12 UT 23:39-01:27 Ill=38% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Jan-13 UT 23:06-00:17 Ill=47% Eudoxus observed by Trouvelot on 1877-2-20

     "Eudoxus" 1877 Feb 20 UTC 21:30-22:30 Observed by Trouvelot (Meudon, 
     France, 13" refractor?) "Fine line of light like a luminous cable, 
     drawn W. to E. across crater". NASA catalog weight=1 (very low). NASA 
     catalog ID #185. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-13 UT 23:06-23:42 Ill=47% Cassini observed by Radford_P on 1972-1-23

     Cassini 1972 Jan 23 UT 16:55-17:15 P.Radford (Harlow, UK, 11.5cm 
     reflector) saw a large red flash followed by several weaker red 
     flashes, situated on the 32,335 foot spot elevation just above 
     the Cassini area. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-13 UT 23:13-01:10 Ill=47% Proclus observed by Cook_MC on 1993-5-28

     On 1993 May 28 at UT 21:02-21:30 M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, 3.3" Questar 
     telescope, x80-x130, atmosphere hazey - poor transparency) noticed that 
     the east side rims were slightly fuzzy and suspects that this might 
     have been due to the illumination angle. A.C. Cook (Frimley, UK) 
     obtained some CCD images that revealed that the effect was to some 
     extent still there one hour later. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=461 and 
     the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-14 UT 00:51-01:51 Ill=47% Aristarchus observed by Mobberley_M on 1985-4-27

     Mobberley and Foley note that Aristarchus was very
     prominent in Earhshine. Little other detail seen
     in Earthshine other than the limb. The Cameron
     2006 extension catalog then says: "Confirm moving 
     side to side. Saw bright blue spot in center" however 
     it is unclear whether this refers to Aristarchus,
     or Torricelli-B - the latter was also undergoing a TLP
     at this time. Cameron 2006 extension catalog ID=267
     and weight=5 (confirmed?). 


2019-Jan-14 UT 00:51-01:51 Ill=47% W_Limb observed by Mobberley_M on 1985-4-27

     On 1985 Apr 27 UT 22:00 M. Mobberley (Suffolk, UK) could not see much 
     detail in Earthshine (apart from Aristarchus), except that there was a 
     brightness on the western limb of the Moon. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=267 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-14 UT 01:16-01:53 Ill=47% Mons_Piton observed by Louderback_D on 1986-10-11

     On 1985 Oct 11 at UT 04:56-05:12 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     4" refractor, x95, seeing=1-2-1 and transparency=4) detected a change 
     in brightness of Mons Piton point D (his designation) during 04:56-
     04:59. The whole of the east slope was affected - initially bright and 
     then faded and there was a blue colour (detected with filters). The 
     variabilty was 8-11sec (Cameron suspects atmosphere as the altitude was 
     low). The brightness stabilized at 05:12UT, but variability resumed 
     until observing finished. As a comparison Aristillus was not seen to 
     change. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=287 and the weight=1. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Jan-13 UT 23:39-01:55 Ill=48% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Jan-14 UT 23:05-23:57 Ill=57% Tycho observed by Barker_R on 1931-3-27

     On 1931 Mar 27 R.Barker (observing from Cheshunt, UK, 12.5" reflector) 
     found that the central mountain in the brilliant ray crater Tycho was a 
     curious shade of grey. This was despite the interior of Tycho being 
     fully in shadow. Cameron 1978 catalog ID=400 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3. 


2019-Jan-14 UT 23:05-23:26 Ill=57% Alphonsus observed by Wise on 1968-4-6

     Alphonsus 1968 Apr 06 UTC 20:30-21:15 Observed by Wise (Slough, 
     England, 17" reflector x190, x350, S=E" Suspected glow inside W.(ast?) 
     wall at 2038" NASA catalog weight=1 (very low). NASA catalog ID #1066.


2019-Jan-14 UT 23:05-23:26 Ill=57% Plato observed by Wise on 1968-4-6

     Plato 1968 Apr 06 UTC 20:30-21:15 Observed by Wise (Slough, England, 
     17" reflector x190, x350, S=E" Dark patches in Plato were prominent" 
     NASA catalog weight=1 (very low). NASA catalog ID #1066.


2019-Jan-14 UT 23:05-23:26 Ill=57% Rupes_Recta observed by Wise on 1968-4-6

     Straight Wall 1968 Apr 06 UTC 20:30-21:15 Observed by Wise (Slough, 
     England), 17" reflector x190, x350, S=E "A shadow from N. end of 
     Straight Wall going toward Birt. Drawing". NASA Catalalog weight=1 
     (very low). NASA catalog ID #1066.


2019-Jan-14 UT 23:05-23:09 Ill=57% Sinus_Aestuum observed by Petek on 1982-6-30

     On 1982 Jun 30 at UT 02:05-02:15 Marco Petek (Porto Alegre, 
     Brazil) found that the region between Eratosthenes and Bode 
     (7W, 13N) looked like it had a darkening (cloud?) that had 
     even darker points inside. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=172 
     and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-14 UT 23:05-23:54 Ill=57% Tycho observed by Spellman_R on 2003-5-10

     Tycho 2003 May 10 UTC 03:15 Observer Robert Spellman (Los Angeles, USA) 
     - "CCD video of spur-like features coming off N & S edges of central 
     peak - spurs pointed eastwards". It is now thought that this effect is 
     almost certainly seeing flare as it is visible on other features in the 
     image, although to a much lesser extent. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-14 UT 23:09-00:39 Ill=57% Eimmart observed by Louderback_D on 1981-8-9

     On 1981 Aug 09 at UT05:08-05:21 D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 3" 
     refractor) found that the bright patch in the southern part of Eimmart, 
     could only be seen well in red light (this is between A, C and D in his 
     feature notation) i.e. 5 brightness values higher than in white or blue 
     light. Indeed in white light this bright area was closer to the east 
     wall bright spot. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=149 and weight=4. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-14 UT 23:40-00:57 Ill=57% N_Pole observed by Barcroft on 1941-3-7

     Cusps 1941 Mar 07 UT 04:00? Observed by Barcroft (Madera, CA, USA, 6" 
     reflector) "Prolongation suspected. (date reported =6th, but if loc. 
     time =7th UT). In this case we have assumed the 7th" NASA catalog 
     weight=1 (very low) NASA catalog ID #485.


2019-Jan-14 UT 23:40-00:57 Ill=57% S_Pole observed by Barcroft on 1941-3-7

     Cusps 1941 Mar 07 UT 04:00? Observed by Barcroft (Madera, CA, 
     USA, 6" reflector) "Prolongation suspected. (date reported =6th, 
     ut if loc. time =7th UT). In this case we have assumed the 7th" 
     NASA catalog weight=1 (very low) NASA catalog ID #485. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Jan-15 UT 00:16-02:11 Ill=57% Proclus observed by Westmoreland_S on 1972-7-19

     Proclus 1972 Jul 19 UT 21:24-21:30 observed by S.Westmoorland 
     (Cropwell-Bishop, UK, 15cm reflector, x48 & x96, image dull 
     but steady) observed a brilliant spot in the NE (IAU?) wall 
     which lasted for about 90 seconds. After fading it was 
     replaced by pulsations for a further 2 minutes. Clouds 
     prevented further observations. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-15 UT 00:59-02:22 Ill=58% Alphonsus observed by Brook_C on 2001-6-29

     On 2001 Jun 29 at UT22:16-22:22 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, 60mm refractor, 
     x120, no spurious colour seen, seeing I) observed that the central 
     peaks of Alphonsus looked bright at 22:16UT but had dimmed by 22:22UT. 
     The three dark patches on the floor of Alphonsus were clearly seen. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-15 UT 00:59-02:22 Ill=58% Arzachel observed by Brook_C on 2001-6-29

     On 2001 Jun 29 at UT 22:16-22:20 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK, seeing 
     conditions very good, x120) reported that the central peak of Alphonsus 
     was brighter than the central peak of Arzachel (or was it the other way 
     around?). Cook observed 4 hours later from Washington DC, USA and found 
     that on CCD images that the central peak of Alphonsus was only slightly 
     less than that of Arzachel. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-15 UT 23:05-23:59 Ill=67% Plato observed by Barker_R on 1937-12-12

     Plato 1937 Dec 12 UT 16:45-21:00 Observed by Barker (Chestnut, 
     England, 12.5" reflector x420) and Fox (Newark, England, 6.5" 
     reflector, 24?x) "Strong streak of orange-brown on E.wall. Floor 
     nearly clear of shad. composed of many veins & thin streaks 
     interwoven. At 21h irreg. extension seen spreading eastward down 
     wall. Confirmed by Barker's younger son. NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very high). ALPO/BAA weight=4. NASA catalog ID #428.


2019-Jan-15 UT 23:05-23:38 Ill=67% Pytheas observed by Robotham on 1982-7-1

     On 1982 Jul 01 at UT 02:23-02:58 Robotham (Springfield, ON, Canada, 
     seeing=II) found that the west rim of Pytheas crater was a very bright 
     yellow-white, indeed brighter than Proclus. At lower magnifications, 
     Pytheas was one of the brightest spots on the Moon. The Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=173 and weight=2. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-15 UT 23:09-00:58 Ill=67% Swift observed by Wilkins_HP on 1927-12-3

     Peirce A 1927 Dec 03 UT 22:00 Observed by Wilkins (England, 15" 
     reflector) "Invisible (date in MBM) is wrong, would be only 6h before 
     NM. Sunrise on crater is at 3d & ? h. No interposition of dates works 
     e.g. 13th or 1926 or Dec 26 1923. Only Dec 3 1927 is feasible as it 
     would be just after 1st Q. & more similar to the May obs.)" NASA 
     catalog weight=4? (high). NASA catalog ID #396.


2019-Jan-15 UT 23:31-00:58 Ill=67% Censorinus observed by Cook_MC on 1988-3-27

     On 1988 Mar 27/28 UT23:30-00:30 M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, 12" reflector) 
     found Censorinus to have a "foggy/fuzzy" appearance that was not seen 
     in adacent areas. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=321 and weight=4. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2. 


2019-Jan-15 UT 23:31-00:58 Ill=67% Proclus observed by Cook_MC on 1988-3-27

     On 1988 Mar 27/28 at UT 23:30-00:30? M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK, 12" 
     reflector) noted that the crater Proclus was bright visibly, but the 
     CED brightness measurement gave the same brightness as Censorinus 
     crater. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=321 and the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.  


2019-Jan-15 UT 23:51-00:57 Ill=67% Agrippa observed by Bartlett on 1966-10-24

     Agrippa 1966 Oct 24 UT 01:48-02:12 Observed by Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, 
     USA, 5" reflector, x283, S=6, T=3-2) "Shadow of c.p. light & grayish, 
     scarcely distinguishable from floor. (sun is quite high (39deg) so 
     shadow ought to be nearly gone)."NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA 
     catalog ID #985. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-16 UT 01:11-02:52 Ill=68% Plato observed by Bartlett on 1968-10-1

     On 1968 Oct 01 at UT 21:00? Bartlett (Baltimore, MD, USA) and Beck 
     (Ohio, USA, x437) observed  lack of detail on the floor of Plato, 
     however the wall of the crater was easily resolved. Cameron says that 
     this was an independent confirmation. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1092 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3. 


2019-Jan-16 UT 01:20-02:26 Ill=68% Ross_D observed by Cross on 1966-10-24

     SE of Ross D 1966 Oct 24 UT 03:17 Observed by Cross (Whittier, 
     CA, USA, 19" reflector, x300, S=3-5, T=3-4) Ross D activity at 
     level 5. ALPO/NAA weight=1 as it is not mentioned in the Cameron 
     catalog.


2019-Jan-16 UT 23:05-01:32 Ill=77% Mare_Humorum observed by MacFarline on 1959-4-19 *

     W. of Mare Humorum (50W, 25S) UTC 00:00? Observed by Mac Farline 
     (England?) "Bright Point" NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID 
     719.


2019-Jan-16 UT 23:19-01:16 Ill=77% Plato observed by Watkins_E on 1972-1-26

     Plato and Plato A 1972 Jan 26 UT 18:25-18:55 Observed by Watkons and 
     Hunt (England, 4.5" reflector x150, x225, and a 2.75" refractor) "Misty 
     patch over A, & a misty brightness over SW wall of Plato. Hunt saw 
     nothing unusual." NASA catalog weight=2 (low). NASA catalog ID #1321.


2019-Jan-16 UT 23:27-01:12 Ill=77% Tycho observed by Robinson_JH on 1980-8-21

     On 1980 Aug 21 at UT20:00 J.H. Robinson (Teighmouth, Devon, UK) 
     detected colour, using a Moon Blink device, and "mistiness" on the 
     southern floor of Tycho crater. The seeing was poor! Cameron 2006 
     catalog ID=104 and weight=1. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-17 UT 01:52-02:57 Ill=78% Ross_D observed by Cross on 1966-10-25

     SE of Ross D 1966 Oct 25 UT 03:46 Observed by Cross (Whittier, 
     CA, USA, 19" reflector, x300, S=2-4 (sometimes 5), T=3-4) "Large 
     bright area obscuring 1/2 of Ross D crater wall. Not present Oct 
     24" NASA catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID 986. 
     Actually some activity was observed the fay before according to 
     the original notes. ALPO/NAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-17 UT 02:14-02:51 Ill=78% Archimedes observed by Pasternak on 1973-6-11

     Archimedes 1973 Jun 11 UTC 21:05-21:15 observed by Pasternak (53deg 
     20'N, 7deg 30'E, 75mm reflector) "Faint red area at the E of Archmedes, 
     diminution from 21.10-21.15UT" - Hilbrecht and Kuveler, Earth, Moon & 
     Planets, 30 (1984), p53-61


2019-Jan-17 UT 23:05-23:35 Ill=86% Plato observed by Pratt_H on 1873-11-1

     Plato 1873 Nov 01 UTC 20:00? Observed by Pratt (England?) "Unusual 
     Appearance". NASA catalog weight=1 (very low). NASA catalog ID #182.
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-17 UT 23:05-00:32 Ill=86% Aristarchus observed by Neville on 1971-9-1 *

     Aristarchus 1971 Sep 01 UT 20:45-21:05 Observed by Neville, 
     Cunnington (Nottingham, UK, 4" refractor x180, altitude, low) 
     "Saw a bright glow, especially in E. wall (Confirm. but not 
     indep.?)" NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1310. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-17 UT 23:05-00:16 Ill=86% Gassendi observed by Foley_PW on 1976-11-3

     On 1976 Nov 03 at UT20:00-21:40 P.W. Foley (Kent, UK) reported a TLP in 
     Gassendi - some obsevers detected colour, others did not. P. Moore did 
     not notice anything unsual earlier at 18:50-19:00, though his seeing 
     was IV-V. Nor did he see anything unsual from 21:53-00:20, but seeing 
     was still IV-V. D. Jewitt, observing 20:34-21:25 and 22:55-23:20 also 
     reported nothing unusual. Amery (Reading, UK, 25cm reflector, x300) did 
     however notice a small reddish spot to west of central ridge, but by 
     20:30UT the colour was less obvious, but the spot was back again at 
     20:45, but not easily seen at 21:00 and gone completely by 21:45UT.  
     N.Bryant (Ilfracombe, UK, 25.4cm reflector, x260), observed 3 red 
     patches on the floor between 20:54 and 21:31UT. A BAA Lunar Section 
     report. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-17 UT 23:48-01:46 Ill=86% Gassendi observed by Rawlings_G on 1968-10-3

     Gassendi 1968 Oct 03/04 UT 19:30-19:50 & 00:20-01:40 Observed 
     by Rawlings (Aylesbury, UK, 6" reflector low magnification) 
     and by Moore (Selsey, Sussex, UK, 12.5" reflector, x360) 
     "Slight blink (Eng.) arcuate in shape, N. of c.p. (Rawlings 
     dubious). Moore, with blink device saw none at 0020-0140h. No 
     LTP in Gass., Ptol. or Aris. 5th or 6th.". NASA catalog 
     weight=1. NASA catalog ID #1093. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-17 UT 23:53-01:30 Ill=86% Aristarchus observed by Robinson_JH on 1980-8-22

     On 1980 Aug 22 at UT20:15-21:29 J-H Robinson () detected violet on the 
     west wall of Aristarchus. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=105 and weight=5. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-17 UT 23:53-01:30 Ill=86% Manilius_B observed by Robinson_JH on 1980-8-22

     On 1980 Aug 22 at 02:15-21:29UT J-H Robinson (Teighmouth, Devon, UK, 
     12" reflector, x200, seeing=II) noticed in the area south east of 
     Manilius that it was brighter in red light than in blue light at 
     20:15UT whereas 1 minute later it was the same brightness in each 
     filter. The effect reappeared at 20:21UT and was particularly strong at 
     20:32UT. Foley (Kent, UK) verified this at 21:01UT - the blink area was 
     of high reflectivity in white light and was bright in red at 21:15UT, 
     thougjh the south east area stopped giving a colour reaction at 
     21:25UT. Madej (Huddersfield) found Manilius B to be norm al at 23:52UT 
     however at 23:55UT it was surrounded by a transient white ring that 
     varied in visibility in an irregular way. Foley found Manilius B had a 
     vivid blue interior and in blue light the ring was black. and not at 
     all seen in red or white light. The CED brightness measurement varied 
     from 1.9 to 2.4. All other regions observed were normal in brightness. 
     Violet was seen on the west wall of Aristarchus though. M.Price 
     (Camberley, UK) found a possible blink in Manilius B but was observing 
     under poor seeing conditions. Cameron 2006 catalog ID=105 and weight=5. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Jan-17 UT 23:59-01:56 Ill=86% Aristarchus observed by Lipskii on 1964-6-21

     On 1964 Jun 21 at UT 21:18 Lipskii and Pospergelis (Shternberg State 
     Ast. Institute, AZI-2" reflector (Cass.) observed Aristarchus: 
     "Polarization meas. with electron polarimeter. Plane of polariz. 
     rotated 2deg fr. the adjacent areas. They interpret it as some 
     scattering medium over the crater. (Source gave date as 6/31/64, 
     misprint =21st?)". The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=820 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=4. 


2019-Jan-18 UT 02:08-02:42 Ill=86% Gassendi observed by Baumeister on 1973-6-12

     Gassendi 1973 Jun 12 UT 20:50-21:15 observed by Baumeister 
     (48.83N, 9.25E, 240mm reflector, T=2, S=3) "Bright point at the 
     NNE slope of the central peak" - Hilbrecht and Kuveler, Earth, 
     Moon & Planets, 30 (1984), p53-61. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-18 UT 02:09-03:56 Ill=86% Herodotus observed by Haas_W on 2003-5-13

     On 2003 May 13 at UT06:40-07:26 W. Haas (Las Cruces, NM, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x321 and x202, S=2, T=3.5) suspected (06:40-06:55UT) that he 
     saw an oval bright feature (intensity 5.5) near the centre of the floor 
     of Herodotus crater indenting into the shadow - however the seeing was 
     none too good, so it is more of a suspicion than a definite sighting. 
     At 07:14-07:26UT he re-examined the region (x202 and x321, S=1-2 and T=
     3.5) and had better glimpses that conformed his initial suspicions of 
     there being an oval indentation bright spot (now intensity 6) into the 
     shadow in the centre of the floor. Of course Herodotus does not have a 
     central peak! There was also a very bright spot on the NW> sunlit rim 
     of Herodotus crater. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-18 UT 02:52-03:32 Ill=87% Herodotus observed by Anunziato_A on 2017-9-2

     On 2017 Sep 02/03 UT 23:55-00:30 A.Anunziato (Parana, 
     Argentina, 105 mm Maksutov-Cassegrain, x154, seeing 6/10, some 
     interuption from clouds) observed a light spot SE of the 
     centre of the floor of the crater, which came and went in 
     visibility. There is a light spot here, but what was unusual 
     was that the visibility decreased over time. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-18 UT 03:01-04:06 Ill=87% Mersenius observed by Unknown_Observer on 1825-1-1

     On 1825 Jan 01 UT17:00? an unknown Russian observer noticed a 
     cloud in Mersenius.


2019-Jan-18 UT 03:21-04:06 Ill=87% Fra_Mauro observed by Bell on 1970-8-14

     nr Fra Mauro 1970 Aug 14 UT 05:00? Observed by Bell (Californina). 
     "Bright blue-white flare (meteor?)(call for obs. at Fra Mauro at 
     perigee because of moonquakes there -- therefore biased to tidal 
     hypothesis. That was the original location given for the A1 moonquake 
     site, but it is located elsewhere now. Ancill. data given for 1970)." 
     NASA catalog weight=1. NASA catalog ID #1273. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-18 UT 03:57-04:06 Ill=87% Herodotus observed by Wilkins_HP on 1950-3-30

     Herodotus 1950 Mar 30 UT 19:00? Observed by Wilkins (Kent, 
     UK, 15" reflector) "Transient c.p. (similar phen. to 
     Bartlett's in later yrs.? see #532). NASA catalog weight=4 
     (good). NASA catalog ID #523. ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-18 UT 23:04-00:33 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by Cook_JD on 1985-5-2

     On 1985 May 02 at UT 20:20-20:38 J.D. Cook (Frimley, UK) noted at 20:20 
     found the south rim (and just outside) to be blurred in appearence and 
     there was also a hazy shadow inside the crater. M.C. Cook found a 
     "break in clarity in break on S wall". Miles (UK) also found the south 
     wall blurred in appearance and Foley (Kent, UK) noted that the area was 
     featureless and the 2 craters positions at 1 o'clock high up on the 
     inner wall were obscured", although just north of these was sharp 
     detail. Foley also recorded that the shadow on the east wall was 
     opaque"and that thye inside of Aristarchus was slate/blue in colour and 
     dull, however by 20:28 the crater had brightened by 0.4 steps on 
     Foley's CED device and the missing craterlets were visible again. Jean 
     (Canada, 4" refractor) observed a rose colour intermittently (UT 1948-
     20:58) - however Cameron suspects that this is chromatic aberation.  
     The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=269 and the weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=3. 


2019-Jan-18 UT 23:04-23:37 Ill=93% Herodotus observed by Mirteto_P on 1995-10-6

     On 1995 Oct 06/07 at UT 22:45-00:00 P. Mirteto (a UAI 
     observer, RI, Italy, 20cm reflector) observed some brightness 
     changes in Herodotus. Please note that this description is a 
     summary of the material on the UAI web site. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Jan-18 UT 23:04-23:57 Ill=93% Prinz observed by Mirteto_P on 1995-10-6

     On 1995 Oct 06/07 at UT 23:05-00:00 P. Mirteto (a UAI observer, RI, 
     Italy, 20cm reflector) observed some brightness changes in Prinz. 
     Please note that this description is a summary of the material on the 
     UAI web site. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-18 UT 23:08-00:09 Ill=93% Archimedes observed by North_G on 1988-9-23

     On 1988 Sep 23 at 19:40-19:55 & 20:36-20:41 G. North (760mm 
     Coude Rrefractor, x250, Royal Grenwwich Observatory, 
     Herstmonceux, UK, seeing V, Transparency: Fair). 19:40-19:55 
     image very unsteady. All seems normal in other crtaters with 
     the exception of Arcimedes. Much of the rim seems indistinct 
     apart from a 1/4 length of the west rim. Strongly suspected 
     that this was due to a combination of seeing and illumination. 
     UT 20:02-20:06 - checked the area with a lower magnification 
     10" Astrographic Refractor - the crater seems more normal, so 
     suggesting that the theory was correct. 20:36-20:41 returned 
     to the 30" reflector, and the crater appeared similar to the 
     start of the session. This is almost certainly not a TLP, but 
     it would be helpful to have some images or sketches to check 
     this theory out. Weight=1.


2019-Jan-19 UT 00:14-04:05 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by Moseley_R on 1983-12-17 *

     On 1983 Dec 17 at UT 17:25-19:20 Moseley (Covington, England, UK, x120 
     and x240, seeing=III and spurious colour present) found that the inside 
     of Aristarchus crater was dull and slightly blue. Suspected the colour 
     to be spurious: at 19:20 at x240 the colour was pink but at x120 there 
     was no colour. Cameron 2006 catalof ID=234 and weight=3. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2. 


2019-Jan-19 UT 00:19-02:07 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by Yamada on 1963-12-28

     Aristarchus, Herodotus 1963 Dec 28 UTC 15:55-16:26 Observered by Yamada 
     et al, (Hiroshima, Japan, 10" reflector, x278) "Red area, spreading to 
     Herod., a perculiar obscuring gray area on N. edge of glow. Drawing. 
     (confirm. of Olivarez? with activit > 1/2 day?)."NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very high). NASA catalog ID #789.


2019-Jan-19 UT 00:19-02:07 Ill=93% Herodotus observed by Yamada on 1963-12-28

     Aristarchus, Herodotus 1963 Dec 28 UTC 15:55-16:26 Observered by Yamada 
     et al, (Hiroshima, Japan, 10" reflector, x278) "Red area, spreading to 
     Herod., a perculiar obscuring gray area on N. edge of glow. Drawing. 
     (confirm. of Olivarez? with activit > 1/2 day?)."NASA catalog weight=5 
     (very high). NASA catalog ID #789. ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Jan-19 UT 00:42-01:45 Ill=93% Aristarchus observed by no on 1966-10-27

     Aristarchus, Cobras Head 1966 Oct 27 UTC 02:30-03:00 Observed by Delano 
     (new Bedford, Massachusetts, USA, 12.5" reflector x360) and Corralitos 
     Observatory (Organ Pass, NM, USA, 24" reflector & Moonblink) "C.p. of 
     Aris. noticeably less bright thro blue filter but very bright thru red 
     & no filter. Shadow of C.p. faint & grayish whereas wall shad. were 
     normal black, (confirm. of Gordon, even tho 2h later?). Sketch of C.p. 
     rated at 10deg in red & no filter, & 8deg in blue. Other features rated 
     same in all 3. Cobra Head had 2 red patches. Sketches. Not confirm. by 
     Corralitos MB". NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID 989.


2019-Jan-19 UT 01:02-02:09 Ill=93% Sirsalis observed by Sorrentino_G on 1999-1-30

     Sirsalis 1999 Jan 30 UTC 01:00-01:20 Observed by Giuseppe Sorrentino 
     (Italy) described as: "A temporary change in appearance to sunlit floor 
     of crater" for further references including images please see: 
     http://digilander.libero.it/gibbidomine/sirsalis.htm and 
     http://digilander.libero.it/gibbidomine/tlp.htm and 
     http://digilander.libero.it/gibbidomine/fotometriasirsalis.htm and 
     http://www.uai.it/sez_lun/sirsalis.htm


2019-Jan-19 UT 01:52-03:00 Ill=93% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Sims_DM on 1977-4-1

     On 1977 Apr 01 at UT 20:40-21:10 D.Sims (Devon Valley, Dawlish, Devon, 
     UK, 25.4cm reflector, Wratten 25 and 44a filters, x300, seeing II) 
     found Schroter's valley clearer in red than in blue. No colour filter 
     reactions seen on other features. This is a BAA Lunar Section 
     observation. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-20 UT 00:03-00:45 Ill=98% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Firsoff on 1955-7-3

     Schroter's Valley 1955 Jul 03 UT 22:00 Observed by Firsoff 
     (Somerset, England, 6.5" reflector x200) "Drawing contains a 
     star-like pt. at N. part of valley." NASA catalog weight=4. 
     NASA catalog ID #597. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-20 UT 00:03-01:17 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Farrant_M on 1968-4-11

     Aristarchus 1968 Apr 11 UTC 22:00? Observed by Farrant (Cambridge, 
     England, 8" reflector, Seeing Antonidi I (very good)) "Crater had on NE 
     (ast. ?) wall a very pale blue color & opposite wall a pale red. No 
     other crater showed color. (similar to #1056)." NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #1067.


2019-Jan-20 UT 00:03-01:29 Ill=98% Gassendi observed by Robinson_JH on 1973-12-8

     Gassendi 1973 Dec 08 UT 20:20-20:22 observed by J-H Robinson 
     (Devon, UK, seeing dair to poor). Suspected blink detected - 
     might have been due to atmospheric condtions?. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-20 UT 00:03-00:51 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Cook_MC on 1985-5-3

     On 1985 May 03 at UT 1959-2330 M.C. Cook (Frimley, UK) and M. Mobberley 
     (Suffolk, UK) both detected a large very bright region on the eastern 
     exterior. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=269 and he weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Jan-20 UT 00:40-02:33 Ill=98% Lichtenberg observed by Hill_H on 1988-4-1 *

     On 1988 Apr 01 atUT01:15-03:20 H.Hill (Lancaster, UK, 10" reflector, 
     x286) observed that east of Lichtenberg were ëxtensive rosy areas" 
     around the northern edge of the lava sheet. Hill believes that it may 
     have been the same effect as seen by Madler (Germany), Barcroft (USA) 
     and Baum's (UK) 1951 observation. The colour was "ünmistakable" and 
     nothing to do with the atmospheric spurious colour. Other features were 
     checked. the cameron 2006 catalog ID=322 and the weight=3. THe ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2. 


2019-Jan-20 UT 01:08-02:03 Ill=98% Plato observed by Mannheim_Observers on 1788-12-11

     Bright point seen on the dark part.
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID is 38 and the weight
     assigned is 5.


2019-Jan-20 UT 02:03-03:44 Ill=98% Moretus observed by Webb_TW on 1871-12-25

     Moretus? 1871 Dec 25 UTC 22:00? Observed by Webb? (England?, 9" 
     reflector?) "Internal twilight in crater #132- a large circular crater 
     nr. S.pole (crater #132 on Goodacre's map is Plato. Webb's map?)" NASA 
     catalog weight=3 (average). NASA catalog ID #173.


2019-Jan-20 UT 02:16-03:23 Ill=98% Aristarchus observed by Fitton on 1977-4-2

     On 1977 Apr 02 at UT22:00-00:00 L. Fitton (Shaw, Lancashire, UK, 8.5" 
     reflector, x200, Wratten 25 and 44A filters, seeing II-III, 
     transparency, good) noticed in Aristarchus, blue to the north west
     (IAU?) internal wall, also blue observed in other small bright objects 
     against dark backgrounds. Lunar rotational axis and optical normal 
     related such that the normal runs NW-SE (IAU?) through these features. 
     Observer deduced that the coliur was obviously spurious and no blink 
     was seen in any feature. The blue disappeared as the lunar altitude 
     increased and no blue seen by 00:00UT. This is a BAA lunar section 
     observation. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-20 UT 02:35-04:25 Ill=98% Vallis_Schroteri observed by Pickering_WH on 1892-5-10

     On 1892 May 10th at 19:00UT? Pickering, based at Arequipa. Peru, using 
     a 12" reflector, saw varitions in vapor col. Drawings were made. Time 
     calculated from the given colongitude. Cameron 1978 catalog ID= and 
     weight=3. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-20 UT 05:23-05:55 Ill=98% Unknown observed by Miranova on 1960-9-5

     On 1960 Sep 04 at UT00:00? Miranova (Russia or Israel) observed a TLP 
     at an unnamed lunar feature: "Spectral photom. of some lunar obj. in 
     4250, > 5000A bands. Spectral plates". Cameron suspects luminescence? 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=730 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 01:01-01:49 Ill=100% Plato observed by Bianchini on 1685-12-10

     Red streak seen on floor of Plato during an eclipse. The
     Cameron 1978 catalog assigns a TLP ID of 14 and a weight of 1.
     The ALPO/BAA catalog assigns a weight of 1 too.


2019-Jan-21 UT 01:01-02:56 Ill=100% Copernicus observed by Beccaria on 1772-10-11

     Bright spot (4th magnitude) seen on eclipsed Moon
     and glimmering specks. Seen by nephew and neice of Beccaria.
     Cameron 1978 catalog weight=4. ALPO/BAA catalog weight=2.


2019-Jan-21 UT 01:01-01:02 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Herschel_W on 1790-10-22

     In 1790 Oct 22/23 at UT 23:00-02:00 W. Herschel (Windsor, UK) observed 
     during a toal lunar eclipse at least 200 small, round (spots?). The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=69 amd weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 01:01-02:18 Ill=100% Proclus observed by Moye on 1898-7-3

     On 1898 Jul 03 at UT 21:35 Moye (France) noted that 30 minutes after 
     mid eclpise, Proclus shone with a reddish light in shadow. The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=301 and the weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-21 UT 01:01-01:57 Ill=100% Stofler observed by Albright on 1910-11-16

     On 1910 Nov 16/17 UT 22:50-00:10 Albright (Edge(b?)aston, England, UK) 
     observed in Stofler crater "A luminous pt. on Moon dur. ecl. (mid-ecl 
     0025) Others saw a meteor on moon from widely seperated places". The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=333 and the weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-21 UT 01:01-01:51 Ill=100% Mons_Pico observed by Pickering_WH on 1912-9-26

     Pico B 1912 Sep 26 UTC 03:00 Observed by Pickering (Mandeville, Jamaca, 
     6.5" reflector) "Haze spreading from eastern end of crater. (MBMW gives 
     9/25/12 but it is 26th UT.)" NASA catalogue weight=2 (low). NASA 
     catalogue ID #341.


2019-Jan-21 UT 01:21-03:09 Ill=100% Eratosthenes observed by Haas_W on 1949-10-7

     Eratosthenes 1949 Oct 07 UT 04:14-05:22 W.Haas (USA) and O'Toole 
     (USA) observed some changes in intensity of features inside this 
     crater - after a lunar umbral passage. The effect lessened over 
     time. Comparisons had been made with measured intensities on the 
     previous and subsequent nights and on other months around the 
     time of Full Moon. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 01:22-02:41 Ill=100% Plato observed by Pedler_J on 1970-8-17

     On 1970 Aug 17 at UT 02:40 Pedler (England) noted that the 
     shadow flowed around instead of over Plato. Wondered if shadow 
     matched the gray of the crater. Within minutes the shadow line 
     looked normal again. At 04:41UT Claudio Pamplona (Brazil) saw a 
     pulsation in Plato during a lunar eclipse. He thought that this 
     was due to falling temperatures. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=
     1274 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 01:59-03:57 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Darling_D on 1982-12-30

     On 1982 Dec 30 at UT10:09-10:58 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 12.5" 
     reflector, x342, S=9/10) found that when the umbra of the eclipse 
     shadow transitted across Aristrachus, the crater was a bright blue - 
     this effect lasted until 10:14UT. Flashes/flickers (~0.1 sec duration) 
     were seen at 10:15UT. He saw another flash at 10:24UT. Another 
     observer, Harris (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 6" reflector, S=9/10) saw 
     flashes at 10:18 (9 or 10 magnitude) - he saw another 2 flashes at 
     10:34 - though the Cameron catalog does not state where on the Moon - 
     Aristarchus??. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=194 and weight=5. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3. 


2019-Jan-21 UT 01:59-03:57 Ill=100% Romer observed by Darling_D on 1982-12-30

     On 1982 Dec 30 at UT 10:09-10:58 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 
     12.5" reflector, x342, seeing=9/10), during a total lunar eclipse, 
     found that Romer had a faint blue glow to it. The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=194 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-21 UT 02:06-05:48 Ill=100% Tycho observed by Fock on 1919-11-7 *

     On 1919 Nov 27 at UT 23:00-01:00 Fock (Germany) observed in the 
     vicinity of Tycho, during an eclipse (mid eclipse at 23:56UT) a long 
     ray in the direction of Longomontanus that remained visible. It was 
     glowing in weak gray-green colour for the whole of the eclipse. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=373 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 02:10-04:07 Ill=100% Janssen observed by Taylor_AR on 1964-12-19

     On 1964 Dec 19 at UT 01:55 A.R.Taylor (London, UK) suspected 
     a brief pinpoint of light near Janssen (unconfirmed). The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 02:15-04:08 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Airy on 1877-8-23

     On 1877 Aug 23/24 at UT 23:10-01:00 Airy, Pratt and Capron (Greenwich, 
     England, France) observed during a lunar eclipse an unusual spectrum 
     with strong absorption in yellow. (Airy) 2 patches of crimson light of 
     short duration. Cameron says that this is a confirmation observation 
     and that Airy was the Astronomer Royal. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=197 
     and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=4.


2019-Jan-21 UT 02:50-04:47 Ill=100% Mare_Nubium observed by Sunduleak on 1964-12-19

     On 1964 Dec 19 at UT 03:28-04:28 Sunduleak and Stock (Cerro-Tololo, 
     Chile, 16" reflector) using photoelectric photometry during a lunar 
     eclipse, observed on the northern edge of Mare Numbium, and south of 
     Copernicus (20W, 0N), a strong anomalous enhancement of radiation 
     (confirmation according to Cameron). On 1964 Dec 19 at UT 02:35 S.J. 
     Hill et al (Kitt Peak??) observed during a lunar eclipse an anomolous 
     bright area (location not given). Cameron says that this is an 
     independent confirmation of Sanduleak and Stock's TLP report. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=868 and 569 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=4.


2019-Jan-21 UT 02:55-04:53 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17

     Aristarchus 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by 
     Argentiere et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm 
     reflectors) Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) 
     during a  lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID 
     #658. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 02:55-04:53 Ill=100% Byrgius observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17

     Byrgius 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere 
     et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm reflectors) 
     Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) during a  
     lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #658. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 02:55-04:53 Ill=100% Kepler observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17

     Kepler 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere et 
     al. (France?) "Crater was extra-ordinarily bright". NASA catalog 
     weight=3 and catalog ID #658. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-21 UT 02:55-04:53 Ill=100% Manilius observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17

     Manilius 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere 
     et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm reflectors) 
     Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) during a  
     lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #658. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 02:55-04:53 Ill=100% Proclus observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17

     Proclus 1956 Nov 17/18 UT 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere 
     et al. (Itatiba City, Brazil, 20, 10 and 6 cm reflectors) 
     Crater may have been brighter than expected(?) during a  
     lunar eclipse. NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #658. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 02:55-04:53 Ill=100% Tycho observed by Argentiere on 1956-11-17

     Tycho 1956 Nov 17/18 UTC 23:30-00:30 Observed by Argentiere et al. 
     (France?) "Crater was extra-ordinarily bright". NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #658.


2019-Jan-21 UT 03:25-05:23 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1956-11-18

     On 1956 Nov 18 at UT 00:00? an unknown observer (Cameron gives an AGU 
     meeting reference) apparently saw a TLP in Aristarchus crater. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=657 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 03:28-05:25 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Budine on 1964-12-19

     On 1964 Dec 19 at UT 03:13-03:14 Budine and Farrell (Binghamton, New 
     York, USA, 4" refractor, x200, S=7, T=5) observed that Aristarchus 
     brightened five times over 1 minute during a lunar eclipse. The cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=870 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-21 UT 04:16-06:08 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Titulaer_C on 1964-6-25

     On 1964 Jun 25 at UT ~01:07 Titulaer (Utrecht, the 
     Netherlands) observed that Aristarchus crater was very bright 
     during an eclipse. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=822 and weight=4. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 04:16-06:08 Ill=100% Grimaldi observed by Azevado on 1964-6-25

     On 1964 Jun 25 at UT ~01:07 Rubens de Azevedo (Brazil) observed 
     a white streak from Grimaldi on the limb, during an eclipse. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=822 and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-21 UT 04:41-06:16 Ill=100% Kepler observed by Wildey on 1962-7-17

     Kepler 1962 Jul 17 UTC 06:24,08:36 Observed by Wildey, Pohn (Mt Wilson, 
     CA, USA, 60" reflector+photometer) "Crater was at Vmag 2.68 at earlier 
     obs. which was .47 mag brighter than av. mag. at 15d & it faded to near 
     normal at later time to V=3.10(photom. measures), a change of 1/2 mag. 
     or @1.5 times in brightness" NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA 
     catalog ID #761.


2019-Jan-21 UT 05:16-06:57 Ill=100% Atlas observed by Chernov on 1950-4-2

     In 1950 Apr 02 at UT 20:00 Chernov (Russia) observed two dark spots in 
     Atlas during a penumbral phase of a lunar eclipse to quickly darken and 
     become sharp in detail. The cameron 1978 catalog ID=524 and weight=1. 
     The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 05:29-07:06 Ill=100% Unknown observed by Miranova on 1960-9-6

     On 1960 Sep 04 at UT00:00? Miranova (Russia or Israel) observed a TLP 
     at an unnamed lunar feature: "Spectral photom. of some lunar obj. in 
     4250, > 5000A bands. Spectral plates". Cameron suspects luminescence? 
     The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=730 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 05:45-08:42 Ill=100% Tycho observed by Chrevremont on 1898-1-8 *

     On 1898 Jan 08 at UT 00:00-01:00 Chrevremont (France?) notcied that 
     during a lunar eclipse, the mid-eclipse shadow was so dark that details 
     of the surface disappeared, all except for the Tycho SSW ray . Cameron 
     comments that it is unsual for that ray to remain when usually the ones 
     towards Kepler and Aristarchus are the ones to stand out? The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=297 and the weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 06:02-07:06 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Moye on 1905-2-19

     On 1905 at Feb 19 at UT 18:00-19:03 Moye (Montpelier, France) observed 
     Aristarchus shining as a star in the dark, during a lunar eclipse. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=320 and he weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-21 UT 06:37-07:06 Ill=100% Lunar_Eclipse observed by Cameron_W on 1968-4-13

     On 1968 Apr 13 at UT05:00-05:45 Cameron and Laczo (Greenbelt, MD, USA, 
     6" refractor, x50, 36" reflector x400, 12" reflector x80, seeing= 
     excellent) observed for the folliwing craters: Aristarchus, Pytheas, 
     Euler?, Censorinus, Plinius?, Proclus, Menelaus, Manilius: "Star-like 
     pts. in the craters. Only Aris. identified certainly, rest fairly 
     certain except Euler & Plinius. Seen in 6-in refr. at 50x but not in 
     36-in refl. at 400x where they were bright, but not star-lie pts. Seen 
     later in 12-in refl. at 80x. In another bldg. Seen 1st @ 1/2h before 
     totality ended, but not earlier dur. tot. tho't by author (WSC) to be 
     geom. & instrumental = power effect". Chilton, K.E. reports in RASCJ 
     that another observer did not report any of what the Greenbelt observers
     saw at all?The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=1065 and weight=4. The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 06:40-07:06 Ill=100% N_Pole observed by Unknown_Observer on 1892-5-11

     On 1892 May 11 at 22:53UT an Unknown observer, during a partial eclipse 
     noticed an extension of the Earth;s shadow beyond the north cusp. 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=278 and weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 06:40-07:06 Ill=100% S_Pole observed by Unknown_Observer on 1892-5-11

     On 1892 May 11 at 22:53UT an Unknown observer, during a partial eclipse 
     noticed an extension of the Earth's shadow beyond the south cusp. 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=278 and weight=0. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 06:40-07:06 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Moore on 1975-11-18

     On 1975 Nov 18 at UT 19:38-23:34 Moore (Johannesburg, South Africa, 2" 
     refractor, S=II), Peters (Kent, UK, 8.5" reflector, x120, S=IV), Good 
     (Guilford, UK, binoculars), Foley (Dartford, Kent, UK, 12" reflector 
     and photographs), and McKay (Kingston, England, UK, 6" reflector, x48) 
     observed the following in Aristarchus during a lunar eclipse: "It 
     appeared much fainter than ever before seen in ecl. by Moore. Fainter 
     than Proc., Cop., & Tycho. Others rated brightness in order-- Hell, 
     Stevinus, Furnerius, proc.; & Proc., Tycho, Hell, Aris. Photos 
     confirmed dimness of it. For some observers it became invis. at S=II 
     (good). Good ranked at least 4 other craters brighter than Aris. & that 
     at 2035h it dimmed. Earthshine cond. extraordinarily good. Peters, at 
     S=IV (fair?) rated Aris. brightest". At 23:50UT LeCroy Jr and Sr 
     (Springfield, VA, 4.5" reflector, S=7) observed four glowing spots on 
     the Moon during a lunar eclipse (including Aristarchus). At 23:50UT 
     Aristarchus was an oval shape with no details seen. It had a ray 
     extending from the south west rim (normal). The north rim was slightly 
     blue and the south west rim very very slightly red. At 23:55UT it was 
     clearing and details showed. At 00:02UT it was clear. Sketches were 
     provided. Cameron comments that the colours fit Fitton's predictions on 
     spectral dispersion in our atmosphere from atmospheric inversions. The 
     brightness measued was 10+ and normal should be 9, and the plain is 
     4.5. The Moon's altitude at the LeCroy site was 45 deg. The Cameron 
     1978 catalog ID=1418-1420 and weight=5 (1-0 for LeCroy report). The 
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-21 UT 06:53-07:06 Ill=100% Kepler observed by Wildey on 1962-7-17

     Kepler 1962 Jul 17 UTC 06:24,08:36 Observed by Wildey, Pohn (Mt Wilson, 
     CA, USA, 60" reflector+photometer) "Crater was at Vmag 2.68 at earlier 
     obs. which was .47 mag brighter than av. mag. at 15d & it faded to near 
     normal at later time to V=3.10(photom. measures), a change of 1/2 mag. 
     or @1.5 times in brightness" NASA catalog weight=5 (very good). NASA 
     catalog ID #761.


2019-Jan-21 UT 06:56-07:06 Ill=100% Oceanus_Procellarum observed by Chernov on 1959-3-24

     On 1959 Mar 24 at UT 1851 Chernov (Russia) observed the follwing in 
     Oceanus Procellarum during a lunar eclipse: "During penumbra of ecl. 
     separate light pts. were sharply g?listing?. Possibly connected with 
     transparancy of the penumbra. (time given was 0851 UT but must have 
     been loc. time p.m. penum. phase started at 1756UT & umbral at 
     1916UT)". The cameron 1978 catalog ID=717 and weight=2. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=1.


2019-Jan-21 UT 06:59-07:06 Ill=100% Aristarchus observed by Kolovos_G on 1989-8-17

     On 1989 Aug 17 at UT 01:02-04:20 G. Kolvos (Thesaloniki, Greece, 
     4"reflector) measured (using photometry) that although there was a 
     gradual fade over the Moon as the eclipse progressed, there was a 2"% 
     rise in brightness of Aristarchus.Graphs were submitted and photos. 
     A.C. Cook supplied CCD images and CCD photometry. A photograph by 
     Conway (Sun Prarie, WI, USA) at the start of the eclipse reveal a 
     bright colourless spot (aparently confirmed). The Cameron 2006 catalog 
     ID=373 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-22 UT 02:33-04:30 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Moore_P on 1985-5-5

     On 1985 May 05 at UT23:25-23:58 UT P. Moore (Selsey, UK) observed a 
     yellow tinge on the southern wall of Aristarchus - this was odd because 
     no colour was seen elsewhere on the Moon. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=
     271 and weight=3. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-22 UT 03:27-05:23 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Unknown_Observer on 1956-11-19

     On 1956 Nov 19 at UT 00:00? an unknown observer (Cameron gives an AGU 
     meeting reference) apparently saw a TLP in Aristarchus crater. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=657 and weight=0. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-22 UT 04:29-06:24 Ill=99% Aristarchus observed by Thomas on 1970-2-22

     Aristarchus 1970 Feb 22 UTC 07:00? Observed by Thomas, Stump, Corral. 
     Obs. (Organ Pass, NM, 24" reflector+Moonblink) "Bluing around crater -- 
     vis. in monitor, but not photographable due to clouds." NASA catalog 
     weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #1235.


2019-Jan-22 UT 04:39-06:16 Ill=99% Littrow observed by Unknown_English_Observer on 1915-1-31

     Littrow 1915 Jan 31 UTC 22:00? Observer: unknown (England?) "6 to 7 
     spots arranged like a gamma first seen on this nite. (Kuiper atlas. 
     Rect. 14-c shows spots in form of a 7 or a cap. gamma backwards, but 
     not l.c. gamma)". NASA catalog weight=0 (almost certainly not a TLP). 
     NASA catalog ID #349. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-22 UT 07:37-08:24 Ill=98% Proclus observed by Green_SM on 1938-11-8

     Proclus 1938 Nov 08 UTC 20:00 Observed by Green (England? Seeing = 
     good) "2 bright spots in Schmidt & Wilkins' craterlets. Was struck by 
     whitish aspect of parts of floor -- possibly mists. S.wall concealed by 
     these strong white patches, as if breached ring." NASA catalog weight=3 
     (average). NASA catalog ID #443.


2019-Jan-22 UT 08:15-08:24 Ill=98% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-18

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 18 UTC 09:54 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness of the area of over a mag. during the nite. 
     Recorded at Vmag=3.56 first, & a few min(?) later at 4.62. It was .95 
     mag. brighter (@2.5x) than av. for that age & then returned to 
     normal." NASA catalog weight=5 (very high). NASA catalog ID #762.


2019-Jan-23 UT 02:44-04:40 Ill=94% Herodotus observed by Brown_M on 1972-7-27

     Herodotus 1972 Jul 27 UT 2250-2350 M.Brown (Hutington, UK) 
     thought that he saw a pseudo peak in the centre of Herodotus.
     He could not decide if it was real or an optical illusion. 
     ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-23 UT 04:20-05:24 Ill=94% Promontorium_Heraclides observed by Moore_P on 1948-10-19

     Heraclides Point 1948 Oct 19 UTC 22:00 Observed by Moore (England, 12" 
     reflector?) "Blurred, misty -- La Place was sharp. White diffused 
     bright spot in S. Iridum close to Heraclides pt." NASA catalog weight=4 
     (high). NASA catalog ID #512.


2019-Jan-23 UT 04:30-06:27 Ill=94% Aristarchus observed by Corralitos on 1970-2-23

     Aristarchus 1970 Feb 23 UTC 07:00? Observed by Thomas & Stump 
     (Corralitos Observatory, Organ PAss, NM, USA, 24" refletor+Moon Blink) 
     "Bluring around crater -- vis. in monitor, but not photographed due to 
     clouds." NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #1235.


2019-Jan-23 UT 04:34-06:31 Ill=94% Mons_Piton observed by Louderback_D on 1990-8-8

     On 1990 Aug 08 at OT 07:47-09:00 UT D. Louderback (South Bend, WA, USA, 
     3" refractor, x173) "(SS) Piton's all pts were << but nearby plain was 
     normal. Ridges at 5.3 at B, C, D but 3 alb at B, C, D (norm = 7) but 
     bearby plain was normal. At A 3, was hazy but ill defined. Parts of mt 
     brightened but others didn't. Times between brightening were 6-8s. 
     Similar to seeing fluctuations. In red mt stayed dull & steady. In blue 
     it blinked." - this is a direct quote from the Cameron 2006 catalog 
     because it is very difficult to summarize. Louderback comments that the 
     TLP was still going on at 09:00UT. The Cameron 2006 catalog ID=406 and 
     the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-23 UT 04:34-06:31 Ill=94% Promontorium_Agarum observed by Darling_D on 1990-8-8

     On 1990 Aug 08 at UT 07:47-09:00 D. Darling (Sun Praire, WI, USA, 3" 
     refractor, x173) reported the following TLP in Promontorium Agarum 
     (Cape Agarum): "W flank of CA >>, even> Proc. interior." The cameron 
     2006 catalog ID=406 and the weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-23 UT 05:55-07:46 Ill=94% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-19

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 19 UTC 07:30 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness from Vmag=3.46 to V=3.07, where av. mag. for that 
     age=3.26, or a brightening of .58 mag." NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog ID #763.


2019-Jan-23 UT 08:11-09:08 Ill=94% Unknown observed by Cragg on 1965-5-18

     On 1965 May 18 at UT 03:00-03:30 Cragg (Mt Wilson?, CA, USA, 6" 
     refractor?) observed a TLP (no feature nor description given in 
     the Cameron 1978 catalog) on the Moon. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=877 
     and weight=4. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-23 UT 08:13-09:08 Ill=94% Mare_Crisium observed by Wildey on 1962-7-19

     Mare Crisium 1962 Jul 19 UTC 09:48 Observed by Wildey & Pohn (Mt 
     Wilson, CA, USA, 60" reflector + Photometer) "Photometric meas. showed 
     change in brightness from Vmag=3.46 to V=3.07, where av. mag. for that 
     age=3.26, or a brightening of .58 mag." NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog ID #763.


2019-Jan-24 UT 04:31-06:28 Ill=87% Aristarchus observed by Corralitos on 1970-2-24

     Aristarchus 1970 Feb 24 UTC 07:00? Observed by Thomas & Stump 
     (Corralitos Observatory, Organ PAss, NM, USA, 24" refletor+Moon Blink) 
     "Bluring around crater -- vis. in monitor, but not photographed due to 
     clouds." NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #1235.


2019-Jan-24 UT 04:32-06:28 Ill=87% Alphonsus observed by Morgan_P on 1972-7-29

     Alphonsus 1972 Jul 29 UT 00:30-03:30 Observed by Morgan (England, UK) 
     "Orange spot just W. of c.p. on central ridge; circular area @ 15-25km 
     diam, larger than c.p. Was bright orange then turned orange-brown 
     toward center. Central 4,5km was darker than rest; bownish-black with 
     blue-white specks flashing in center. Obscur. there but ridge clear 
     elsewhere. The dark spot SW of c.p. could not be seentho outside of 
     color area. Sketch. It had appearance of dome of atm. thicker at 
     center. Never seen before in 11y. Next nite brighter. NASA catalog 
     weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1337. ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-24 UT 07:54-09:09 Ill=86% Aristarchus observed by Brook_C on 2002-5-30

     On 2002 May 30 at UT02:30-02:44 C. Brook (Plymouth, UK) suspected that 
     Aristarchus crater looked dimmer than normal. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-25 UT 02:24-04:46 Ill=79% Ross_D observed by Reneau on 1964-2-2 *

     On 1964 Feb 02 at UT08:30-09:40 G.Reneau and B.Crowe (2.4" 
     refractor, x90)observed Ross D to be double. This was during a 
     time when observers were looking for a Ranger crash plume. The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=799 and weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-25 UT 03:41-04:01 Ill=78% S_Pole observed by Unknown_Observer on 1895-9-8

     On 1895 Sep 07 an unknown observer (Lewis Swift?) observed a pale blue 
     segment on the upper limb - this was apparently confirmed by Faulkes 
     (Mem. BAA, 1895). Cameron says that this is probably 1895 Sep 08 at UT 
     06:00 as Sep 07 is local time. She also infers that "upper limb" is the 
     southern limb and that Swift was at the Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, 
     AZ, USA. The Cameron 1978 catalog ID=285 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA 
     weight=2.


2019-Jan-25 UT 04:39-06:35 Ill=78% Alphonsus observed by Morgan_P on 1972-7-30

     Alphonsus 1972 Jul 30 UT 00:30-03:30 Observed by Morgan (UK 
     using a reflector) "Orange glow, brighter this nite than last 
     nite. Following nites were cloudy. Aristarchus and Gassendi 
     were negative." NASA catalog weight=3. NASA catalog ID #1338.
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-25 UT 08:04-09:10 Ill=77% Romer observed by Darling_D on 1979-8-12

     On 1979 Aug 12 at UT07:00-10:35 D. Darling and wife (Sun Prarie, WI, 
     USA, 12.5" reflector, x342, photos, S=9/10) observed a cigar shaped 
     protruberance in Romer crater that cast a 32km long shadow, nestled in 
     a valley rille next to Romer. This was a confirmed observation. The 
     effect persisted intil sunset. The top of the object and two points on 
     the crater rim were reflecting the Sun's rays. "Top of obj. & 2 pts on 
     crater rim reflected suns rays. It was as high as the crater rim 
     whereas the rill wall was not. Took photos. he has studied this area 
     and never saw such a phenom before. Photos did not show it". The 
     Cameron 1978 catalog ID=65 and weight=5. The ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-28 UT 06:33-07:56 Ill=46% Alphonsus observed by Alter on 1956-10-26

     Alphonsus 1956 Oct 26 UT 12:54 Observed by Alter (Mt Wilson, CA, 
     USA, 60" reflector, S=E) "Photog. thru UV & IR filters. Obscur. 
     of E. 1/2 of floor evident in blue plates -- KodakII-O plate no 
     filter. 2m later Kodak I-N. One pair of plates best he'd ever 
     seen. Similar obscuration seen 2X on Linne (this started Kozyrev 
     on his spectrographic program.)." NASA catalog weight=5 (very 
     high). NASA catalog ID #653.


2019-Jan-28 UT 05:23-08:43 Ill=45% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Jan-29 UT 06:01-06:48 Ill=35% Aristarchus observed by Firsoff on 1955-7-13

     Aristarchus 1955 Jul 13 UTC 02:50 Observed by Firsoff (Somerset, 
     England) "Brilliant in blue & green filters. Didn't seem to be as clear 
     as other craters." NASA catalog weight=4 (good). NASA catalog ID #598.


2019-Jan-29 UT 06:01-06:14 Ill=35% Grimaldi observed by Taylor_DB on 1972-8-2

     Grimaldi 1972 Aug 02 UT 23:42 Observed by Taylor, Findlay, Ford 
     (Dundee, Scotland, 10" refractor, x180, filters) "Blink in crater, 
     slight but definite on W. wall. Appeared bright without filters. 
     Confirmed by Findlay & Ford. Aris., Gass. & prom. Heraclides were 
     normal." NASA catalog weight=5. NASA catalog ID #1339. ALPO/BAA 
     weight=4.


2019-Jan-29 UT 06:01-06:49 Ill=35% Copernicus observed by Brook_C on 1996-9-6

     Copernicus 1996 Sep 06 UT 01:45 Observed by C Brook (Plymouth, UK, 60mm 
     refractor x28, x112, transparency, not good) "Shadows of central 
     mountains could not be seen although the shadows on the crater ramparts 
     were visible" BAA Lunar Section report. ALPO/BAA weight=2.


2019-Jan-29 UT 06:01-08:44 Ill=35% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Jan-30 UT 06:41-08:46 Ill=25% Earthshine: sporadic meteors

2019-Jan-31 UT 07:24-08:03 Ill=17% Herodotus observed by Firsoff on 1955-7-15

     Herodotus 1955 Jul 15 UT 03:50 Observer by Firsoff (Somerset, England, 
     6.5" reflector?) "Shadow from apparent c.p. (Orbiter photos don't show 
     it but Apollo 16 oblique shows a very low hill or hills, but slope is 
     < 2.5deg" NASA catalog weight=4 (high). NASA catalog ID #599.
     ALPO/BAA weight=3.


2019-Jan-31 UT 07:24-07:26 Ill=17% Aristarchus observed by Moeller_J on 1987-10-17

     On 1987 Oct 17 at UT17:00-18:00 (in daylight) J. Moeller (Kerkville, 
     NY, USA, 6" reflector, x80-x135) observed that Aristarchus had a long 
     trench-like feature going off to the north west limb. On the 18th this 
     feature was more cloud like, "bright white and opaque. (Trench = 
     Schrotes Valley? Similar to 10/13/67)". The Cameron 2006 catalof ID=311 
     and the weight=1. The ALPO/BAA weight=1.


2019-Jan-31 UT 07:24-08:47 Ill=17% Earthshine: sporadic meteors